Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

Introduction to Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

I wrote this Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the unified Scheme of Work on Social Habit for Kindergarten class. The Unified Scheme of Work on Social Habit for Kindergarten is part of our collection of official Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes for Nigerian Schools.

All of our Schemes of Work are from official sources and are suitable for use in the 36 states. Click here to view and download Complete Schemes of Work for all classes and subjects for Pre-Nursery; Nurseries; Kindergarten; Primary; JSS and SSS. Alternatively, click here to chat with us directly. Or, click here to download the schemes from our store on paystack.

On Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

We are at a point in History when violation of the rights of every child is on the increase. Parents and concerned members of the society are always afraid of the many dangers that threaten children on a daily basis. Invariably, the best and first security against these threats, is to arm every child with appropriate knowledge. And what better time to initiate this process than the time just before formal schooling begins?

According to the official definition in Nigeria, Kindergarten is the switchover class from preschool to basic education. Hence, the educational research and development arm of the ministries of education in its professional judgement; placed the topic in this lesson note to prepare ahead.

Consequently, schools and teachers must spare no effort in ensuring that pupils fully attain the objectives of this topic. Similarly, the objectives of this topic are some key foundations parents should look out for before sending their preschoolers to primary school.

We wrote this lesson note to make it easy for both school teachers and parents to easily help their Kindergarten children achieve the objectives.


Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to:

Cognitive

  • Define child rights
  • Mention at 10 rights of a child
  • Mention the rights they enjoy and those they are denied

Affective

  • Demonstrates observance of applicable rights when working with younger children

Psychomotor

  • Colour/paint sketched copies depicting child rights

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as follows:

Step 1 – Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher paints a scenario and asks a question that depict the meaning of “human” right – preferably through story:

First Scenario: to introduce human right to children

Once upon a time, there are two children. The name of the first is Nnamdi. He is 5 years old. The name of the second child is Damilola. She is 3 years old. Their parents are Mr. & Mrs. Abubakar. The children attend Children’s Day School.

One day, their parents dropped them off at the school entrance. But since Damilola was still toddling, she couldn’t cross the door threshold.

Discussion: What do you think Nnamdi did when he saw that Damilola is unable to cross the door threshold?

Indeed, he helped Damilola to cross without been told!

DISCUSSION: Why did Nnamdi helped Damilola without been told to do so?

Yes, because she is a “child”.

Second Scenario: to introduce human right to children

Once upon a time, there are two children. The name of the first is Nnamdi. He is 5 years old. The name of the second child is Damilola. She is 3 years old. Their parents are Mr. & Mrs. Abubakar. The children attend Children’s Day School. At school, Nnamdi has a friend. The name of Nnamdi’s friend is Gbedeojo. Gbedeojo is also 5 years old.

One day at school, during the first break, Damilola and Gbedeojo ate all their food. But Nnamdi kept a little part of his food until lunch time. When it was lunch, all the children were hungry. But only Nnamdi had a little part of his food left. The little part will not be enough for neither Nnamdi alone, Nnamdi and Damilola his sister nor the three of them. The food will only be enough for Damilola because she was younger. Damilola is already crying of hunger. And she won’t stop crying until she eats to the fill.

Discussion: What do you think Nnamdi did?

No, Nnamdi did not eat all the remaining part of his food alone. Instead, he took a few bites and gave the larger remaining part to Damilola. Damilola ate and was satisfied.

DISCUSSION: Why did Nnamdi not eat the remaining part of his food alone nor give it to his but to Damilola, after all she ate all of hers alone?

Yes, because Damilola is a child.

NOTES:

Teacher should replace emphasized words (names) with those from the locality that the pupils can relate with. In addition, teacher should tell the story in a manner the pupils will understand – use local dialect, and emphasize if necessary. Particularly, sketch or source for pictorial illustrations which to show the pupils as you tell the story. This aids faster comprehension.

Concluding Introduction

Following the discussion that will ensue either of the narrations above, the teacher reiterates that Damilola enjoyed the benefits accorded her because she was a child. Further, the teacher explains that human beings instinctively knows that a child is deserve to enjoy some things – not for any reason but because s/he is a child.

Following these, teacher tells the pupils that they shall learn about the things that every child – like and including them – deserve to enjoy.

Step 2 – Meaning of Child Rights

Child Rights are the good way of living that every child is deserve to enjoy in order for them to be happy and develop well into responsible adults.

Teacher explains this definition thoroughly with the help of charts.

Good way of living

This includes what a child eats (nourishment), the environment of a child, what a child does, what a child is taught, how a child is treated, etc. The teacher displays contrasting pictures of each of these – one idea, and the other below desirable standard of living.

Every child

The teacher explains that child right is not only for some children from a particular country, race, tribe or social class. Instead, child right applies to all children all over the world. Children are people that are not up to eighteen (18) years of age – teacher stresses this.

Reason for Child Rights

Finally, the teacher explains the benefit of child rights and what will happen when there are not child rights.

1.       To be happy

Observing child rights makes all children happy (image or video of happy children). And when there are no child rights, children are sad (image or video of sad children) – doesn’t mean that every time a child is sad, there is absence of child rights though☺.

2.       Develop well

Teacher explains that develop means to grow. So, to develop well means to grow well – physically (body) and psychologically (the way they think, understand, feel and behave). Use appropriate images or videos of children to demonstrate proper and improper development.

3.        Become Responsible adults

Teacher explains that children that enjoy child rights grow up to become responsible adults. Adults are people that are eighteen years and above. Responsible is to do the good things that are expected of someone – teacher stresses meaning of adults and responsible. Thereafter, s/he emphasizes thoroughly that children who enjoy child rights grow up to become responsible adults otherwise, irresponsible – use appropriate images or videos to demonstrate responsible and irresponsible adults.

Stage Evaluation Questions

After explaining the meaning of child rights as I have written above, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding before proceeding to the remaining part of the lesson.

  1. The good way of living that every child deserves to enjoy is called ____________
    1. Right child
    2. Child rights
  2. A child is someone that is not up to _________________ years
    1. 14
    2. 18
  3. Child rights are for all the children in ____________
    1. Nigeria
    2. The whole world
  4. Doing the good things that is expected of someone is called ______________
    1. Responsible
    2. Adult
  5. Someone that is 16 years is a _____________
    1. Child
    2. Adult
  6. Someone that is 19 years is a ___________
    1. Child
    2. Adult
  7. Mention three things that will happen if there is no child rights

Step 3 – List of Child Rights

After the teacher ascertains that the pupils understood the meaning of child rights, s/he leads them to list out the child rights. The teacher uses appropriate charts to explain each thoroughly:

The rights of every child in Nigeria are:

1.       Right to Good birth

It is the responsibility of the parents to make sure they can provide a safe environment for their unborn child. This includes proper medical attention and care from conception, birth, and throughout childhood years in a new-born services unit or paediatric centre.

2.       Right to identity

  1. Right to family life
  2. Right to private life
  3. Right to protection from harm
  4. Right to good food and health
  5. Right to free quality education
  6. Right to government responsibility
  7. Right to freedom of thought & religion
  8. Right to freedom from discrimination
  9. Right to freedom of movement
  10. Right to freedom of association
  11. Right to leisure and cultural activities
  12. Right to dignity of the child
  13. Right to freedom from contracts

After mentioning each, the teacher explains what it means thoroughly with examples of common social experiences – refer to the Nigerian Child’s Right Act 2003 (in bibliography for explanation). S/he does this with the aid of charts, pictures and videos (where possible).

Special Notes

While explaining, teacher should communicate desirable social skills that is expected of the pupils towards each other and younger children. For example, when explaining rights to identity; charge pupils not to bully other children by labelling them with undesirable name. Also, discourage hitting other children as a way to observe the right to dignity of the child.

Others include caring for younger children as a way to observe right to protection from harm. And tolerance as a way to observe right to freedom from discrimination.

Similarly, for schools that observes it; this is also a great time to introduce activities such as Food Bank Drive for the World Children’s Day celebration – being on 20th November.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before the teacher proceeds to the last part of the lesson, s/he assesses the pupils’ understanding of the rights of a child. S/he does this by giving them the following exercises:

Exercise 1 – Painting/Colouring Sketches of Child Rights

The teacher makes outlines/sketches of pictures depicting each of the rights of a child just as the sample below. Then, s/he leads the pupils to identify the right that the sketch represents. Afterwards, s/he leads the pupils to paint/colour the sketch.

Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 - National Child Day Activity
Source: Government of Canada’s National Child Day: Activity kit
Exercise 2 – Oral /Written Test on Child Rights

The teacher prepares and asks the pupils questions towards identifying child rights within daily social circles – questions to be included when updating this note.

Exercise 3 – Observing Interaction Between Children

Finally, the teacher pays attention to how the pupils interact with one another and younger children for hints of improvement – and to encourage areas of development where necessary.

Step 4 – The Nigerian Child’s Act (Law)

In the final part of the lesson, the teacher explains to the pupils that Nigeria made Child Rights into law in 2003 – as such, the law is called The Child Right Acts 2003. S/he explains further, this means that any states that sign the law; then people in that state can be arrested and punished if they violate any of the Child Rights.

The teacher goes further and reveals that only eleven states are yet to sign the Child Right Act. These states are Bauchi, Yobe, Kano, Sokoto, Adamawa, Borno, Zamfara, Gombe, Katsina, Kebbi, and Jigawa.

SUMMARY

Before the summative assessment, the teacher summarizes the lesson into a concise note. Then, s/he writes it for the pupils to copy into their exercise books.

Child’s Right

Meaning

Child Rights are the good way of living that every child is deserve to enjoy in order for them to be happy and develop well into responsible adults.

Children are people that are not up to eighteen (18) years of age.

Reasons for Child’s Right
  1. To be happy
  2. To develop well
  3. To become responsible adults
The Rights of a Child

The rights of a child are:

  1. Right to good birth
  2. Right to identity
  3. Right to family life
  4. Right to private life
  5. Right to protection from harm
  6. Right to good food and health
  7. Right to free quality education
  8. Right to government responsibility
  9. Right to freedom of thought & religion
  10. Right to freedom from discrimination
  11. Right to freedom of movement
  12. Right to freedom of association
  13. Right to leisure and cultural activities
  14. Right to dignity of the child
  15. Right to freedom from contracts

Nigeria made the child’s rights into law in 2003. And this law is called the Child’s Rights Act 2003.

EVALUATION

Prior to concluding the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the lesson. S/he does this by giving them appropriate exercises based on the content.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 – by marking the pupils’ exercises. Then, s/he records the marks and provides appropriate feedbacks.

S/he may also lead the class to concentrate more on preparing for the World Children’s Day in November.


Please let us know what you think about this lesson guide through the feedback form below and/or in the comment box.

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Bibliography

Adebowale, N. (2019, May 11). UPDATED: 11 states in northern Nigeria yet to pass child rights law — UNICEF Official. Retrieved from Premium Times Nigeria: https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/more-news/329511-12-states-in-northern-nigeria-yet-to-pass-child-rights-law-unicef-official.html

Federal Republic of Nigeria. (2003). CHILD’S RIGHT ACT, 2003. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj0jryvxZTzAhVt7OAKHb5JBpEQFnoECAMQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.refworld.org%2Fpdfid%2F5568201f4.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0VZ8P1oBA_nagObSxPRsKE

Makati Medical Centre. (2019, October 30). Celebrating National Children’s Month: The 12 Rights of a Child. Retrieved from Makati Medical Centre: https://www.makatimed.net.ph/news-and-exhibits/news/celebrating-national-childrens-month

UNICEF. (2009). CHILD-FRIENDLY SCHOOLS MANUAL. New York: UNICEF. Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org/documents/child-friendly-schools-manual

Wikipedia. (2021, February 16). Child Rights Act in Nigeria. Retrieved from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_Rights_Act_in_Nigeria

 

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 – 3

Introduction to Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 – 3

This Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 – 3 helps you starts off the journey of teaching your child to become fluent reader by age 5, be it from a school classroom or home. By the time your child is 5 years old, going to Primary 1; he or she should be able to read effortlessly.

I do not mean simple reeling off of common words from text such as in the Queen Primer series alone; but actual reading with ability to pronounce “new” or “strange” words with ease. Their pronunciation should be accurate. And they would have acquired firm foundation for spelling and vocabulary.

How Can You Teach Your Child to Read Fluently By 5?

The fastest way to teach your child to read fluently by the time he or she is five years, is through Phonics. This is a method I personally employed over a period of 10 years to teach children how to read. And the result is remarkable. Also, this is the method included as Phonics in the Early Childhood Education curriculum.

I wrote this Phonics guide based on the Scheme of Work for Pre-Nursery. The scheme contains a breakdown and progression of Phonics lesson for pre-schoolers. Private schools that run preschool and day care institutions uses the Pre-Nursery Scheme of Work to prepare children for Nursery education. In government setting however, it is recommended that parents provide this training (care). Even parents of children that attends preschool still augment with home care.

If you are interested in getting the Pre-Nursery Scheme of Work, please click here to download from our website store. Or Click here to download it from our store on Paystack.

Recommended Phonics Textbook for Nigerian Schools

In preparing this guide, I consulted one of the latest Phonics Textbooks for children between 2 -5 years; together with one or two websites – which I list in the references at the end of the post. The Phonics textbook, I Can Read With Phonics, is a systematic approach to learning to read in a fun and easy way.

Activities in the book covers Phonemic awareness, Phonics, Vocabulary, Fluency and Comprehension. They were creatively presented and cognitively/developmentally appropriate for leaners between 2 -5 years. The author is an experienced teacher and reading instructor.

Published by Ahmadu Bello University Press, I personally recommend this Phonics textbook for parents and Schools in Nigeria. I reference exercises from the book in this guide. To get a copy for your child or to adopt the textbook for your school; kindly send us a request and you will get reply under 5 minutes. Or click here to Chat we us on WhatsApp

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 -3

I wrote this Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 – 3; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this note for official purpose – i.e., to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow our guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 – 3

Topic: Aa – Bb Sounds

OBJECTIVE

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to:

  • produce both sounds (individually), and together
  • name objects that begin with each

PRESENTATION

The teacher teaches the topic, one step after another as I have laid out below.

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher introduces the pupils to the concept of reading:

  • S/he reads and narrates an interesting short story from a book
  • Then the teacher asks the pupils whether the story was interesting
  • Thereafter, s/he asks the pupils if they have heard any other interesting story in the past – and if there is any, willing pupil(s) may be allowed to share their stories.
  • After the pupils’ stories, or if there is none; the teacher asks where stories come from – i.e. where people – such as their parents – get stories from.
  • Following the pupils’ responses, the teacher explains that there are a lot of interesting stories in books. And if only they could read; they would be able to learn a lot more stories. Succeeding this, the teacher asks if they would like to learn how to read.
  • The pupils should say yes. Therefore, the teacher reveals that to be able to read, they must learn about words; and to learn words, they must learn about letters and their sounds.

Finally, the teacher reiterates that each of the letters which the learned in their Letter Work lessons has unique sound. And this is the sound we make when we pronounce. Thence, the teacher reveals they are going to learn the sound of the letters so they would be able to read.

From there, the teacher revises the meaning of the keywords – read, words, letters and sounds – as s/he has taught them in Letter Work.

Step 2: Producing the Sound of Letter A – /a/

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils the basic (short) sound of letter A – /æ/ as in the following steps:

  • Write or display alphabet A. Then ask the pupils to name it – as a reminder to Letter Work class
  • Explain that the alphabet is so-called (the name) only when we write it alone – i.e., when the letter is standing alone. But if we write the alphabet together with other alphabets (to form a word), such as “An” and “At”; then we make or call the sound of the letter instead of the name. The teacher emphasizes the meaning of a word – as a (meaningful) combination of alphabets.
  • Succeeding the explanation, the teacher makes the short /æ/ sound
  • Then s/he teaches the pupils how to make the short A (/æ/) sound as follows:
    • Direct them to open their mouth so that you (the teacher) can see their tongue and lower teeth
    • Tell them to place their tongue under their lower teeth
    • Finally, let them exclaim ah! briefly

The teacher repeats this with the pupils many times in a fun manner. S/he may make the pupils do it in turns.

Step 3: Objects or words beginning with /a/

After the pronunciation exercise, the teacher tells the pupils that there are lots of words which begins with the /æ/ sound – some of such words being names of people, objects, place and animals around us,

Then teacher asks if any pupil could mention a name of a person, animal, place or object or things we say that when we want to mention, starts with the /æ/ sound.

Afterwards, the teacher gives examples of such short words which begins with /æ/:

Ant, Adam, Apple, Ali, Arm, etc.

Note: First of all, display the picture of each before asking the pupil to mention the name – the picture serves as cues. And this aid retention.

Other Short Words that Begin with Short A /æ/ Sound

After such names as above, the teacher explains that there are things (words) which though may not be names; but we say when discussing with people that also begins with /æ/ sound. S/he may request pupils to mention anything that we (people) say which begins with the sound.

In the end, the teacher lists the following with appropriate picture to illustrate the meaning:

At

“An” or “And” (pick only one to avoid confusion)

As

Am

Al

Ax

Warning:

Do not use word like Aeroplane. First, the A does not take the /æ/ sound. And secondly, the word is too long __ hence, it may constitute difficulty to some of the pupils.

For each of the sample word, the teacher makes the pupils pronounce with emphasis on the beginning /a/ sound.

Short A sound /æ/ Rhyme

In order to further aid retention and add more fun to the lesson, the teacher teaches and sings the short A sound /æ/ rhyme – in page 5 of I Can Read with Phonics Textbook – with the pupils, many times. Make sure to demonstrate as like a soldier, LOL.

Step 4: How to pronounce /b/

After learning and practicing the /a/ sound, the teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce the sound for alphabet B (/b/) as follows.

  • Write or display the letter b and ask pupils to name it – as a reminder
  • Explain that the letter is so-called (the name) only when we write it alone – i.e., when the letter is standing alone. But if we write the alphabet together with other alphabets (to form a word), then we make or call the sound of the letter instead of the name. The teacher emphasizes the meaning of a word – as a (meaningful) combination of alphabets.
  • Next, the teacher makes the /b/ sound
  • Then s/he teaches the pupils how to make the /b/ sound following these steps:
    • Tell the pupils to open their mouth and withdraw their tongue – i.e., pull the tongue back so that it does not touch the teeth or any part of their inner mouth particularly the palate.
    • While their tongue remains in that position, let them put their lips firmly together.
    • Finally, tell them to let out air at once without opening their lips wide.

The teacher practices this with the pupils many times, in a fun manner – such as fall the paper with B sound game.

Step 5: Objects/words beginning with /b/

After the pronunciation exercise, the teacher tells the pupils that there are a lot of words that begins with the sound /b/ which they will see when they start reading. Some of such words are names of objects, animals, person or things we do.

Hence, the teacher asks the pupils if any could mention an object, animal or person which when we want to say, we begin with /b/ sound.

Afterwards, the teacher gives examples such words with illustration (where possible):

Ball

Boy

Ben

Boot

Bag,

Bat,

Baba,

Bee, …

The teacher pronounces and make the pupils to pronounce each word repeatedly with emphasis on the beginning /b/ sound.

Warning:

Avoid using words like bread which has two consecutive consonants as this pose difficulty to the pupils at this stage. I also advise that you do not include word like Baby. This is because the letter A in the word carries sound other than the one for week. And this may cause confusion for the pupils. However, if a pupil mentions it as example, you should duly acknowledge that it is correct.

Other Short Words that Begin with B /b/ Sound

After such names as above, the teacher explains that there are things (words) which though may not be names; but we say when discussing with people that also begins with /b/ sound. S/he may request pupils to mention anything that we (people) say which begins with the /b/ sound.

In the end, the teacher lists the following with appropriate picture to illustrate the meaning:

Ba

Be

Bi

Bo

By

Note:

The focus is on making the pupils able to produce the /b/ sound. Hence, practice with them many times.

/b/ Rhyme

In order to further aid retention and add more fun to the lesson, the teacher teaches and sings the /b/ sound rhyme – in page 5 of I Can Read with Phonics Textbook Level 1 – with the pupils, many times. Make sure to demonstrate as like a soldier, LOL.

Step 6: Blending /æ/ and /b/

After learning how make both /æ/ and /b/ sounds the teacher teaches the pupils to blend both sound or at least attempt to.

To do this,

  • S/he forms two letter word (&) with both letter ab & ba
  • Teacher explains that ab and ba are words – since both are a combination of letters. Hence,
  • S/he demands who can read/pronounce the words by calling the sounds together.
  • After receiving attempts, the teacher pronounces each word:
    • pronounce the first sound /a/, then the second, giving some seconds delay initially. Then do same again and again, reducing the delay each time until both blends to sound as one
    • Let the pupils do same.

Note that ab and ba may be confused for the same thing. Hence, he teacher explicitly tell them the difference that a comes first in ab while b comes first in ba.

EVALUATION

  1. To assess the pupils’ understanding, the teacher displays some objects whose spelling begins with /b/ and /a/ make the pupils identify or name the object then s/he asks the beginning sound whether /a/ or /b/

Examples of words /objects

Bone

Bread

Ankle

Bed

  1. Let the pupils do the first and second row of exercises in page 6 of I Can Read with Phonics Textbook Level 1

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Phonics Week 2 -3 by marking the pupils’ books and giving them appropriate feedback. S/he may direct parents on how to guide their children through exercises if such requires further practice.

MATERIALS CONSULTED

Dictionary.Com. (n.d.). WORDS THAT START WITH “B”. Retrieved from Dictionary.Com: https://www.dictionary.com/e/word-finder/words-that-start-with-b/

Merriam-Webster. (n.d.). “Ew” and other Words Added to the Scrabble Dictionary 2018. Retrieved from Merriam-Webster: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/new-scrabble-words-2018/frowny

Obiorah, I. R. (2020). I Can Read with Phonics. Zaria, Kaduna: Ahmadu Bello Press Limited.

YouGoWords. (n.d.). 2 Letters and Start With A. Retrieved from YouGoWords: http://www.yougowords.com/start-with-a/2-letters

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8

Introduction to Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8

I wrote this Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 based on the Pre-Nursery Scheme of Work. This scheme of work is drawn from the latest National Curriculum for Early Childhood Education by NERDC. Accordingly, this lesson note is for teachers and schools in Nigeria. Nonetheless, its vastness makes it useful to other people including other schools and teachers elsewhere. Particularly, parents from wide range of places use these guides to help their young scholars.

Note for Teachers:

If you are a teacher or school owner/administrator, kindly note that this lesson note is not same as what you (the teacher) should submit to your supervisors. The Quality Assurance Department of most of the ministries of education have standard layout for teachers to develop their lesson plans. If you intend to submit this as lesson plan, click here to download our professional lesson plan template. Once you get it, you can easily create your lesson plan by filling the template with the contents that I have already written here.

Introduction to Pre-Writing Activities

Eligible writing is one of the cardinal points (objective) of early years schooling. The others being social skills, reading and numeracy. Teachers of children in their early years may be evaluated by the children’s level of penmanship; just as children’s level of improvement.

One who is close to a parent whose child is in the early years would often hear such parent say “my child can now write “. Such parent may complain that “my child cannot still write well “. This is because the parents also understand the importance of penmanship.

Professionally, it is recommended (and often debated) that children should develop writing skills before reading. And just like any other skills, writing must be practiced.

The practice of penmanship is divided and taught as two related subjects all through the early years; pre-writing and hand writing. Pre-writing is usually reserved for the first of the early years. Both denote all activities a child undertakes in order to enable them write well and fast.

Typically, Pre-Writing Activities prepares children for eligible handwriting. It teaches children how to hold pencil correctly, form patterns that make up the letters and numbers; and also correct letter formation or how to form the letters.

These are the objectives of Pre-Writing Activities at the Pre-Nursery level. This week discusses the last of the writing patterns. As such, pupils should thenceforth be able to form a handful of the letters; with appropriate guidance.

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8

SUBJECT:  Pre writing Activities

TERM: First Term

WEEK: 4

CLASS: Pre – Nursery

TOPIC: Writing Pattern – crescent shapes making – concave and convex

OBJECTIVES of Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to do the following:

  • Cognitive: identify the three straight line patterns in writing; and differentiate between the lines
  • Psychomotor: arrange sticks into vertical, horizontal and standing position to form net or a mesh.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

The teacher shall collect straw (pipes) to be used for the mesh – making activities. Alternative to making all straw (pipes) mesh a combination of four straws (pipes) and thread may be used. To make the mesh more aesthetic different colors of straw/rope may be used.

PRESENTATION

To deliver the lesson, the teacher follows the steps given below:

Step 1: Introduction
The teacher introduces the lesson by revising the previous (Week 4 – 6) lesson. He or she does this by carrying the following exercises with the pupils:

Questions & Answer

  1. Who like to be able to write like adults so they can write about the things they want?
  2. What is the first step to be able to write well? Answer: Holding pencil well
  3. Invite a pupil to demonstrate correct (tripod) pencil grasp: Who can show us the correct way to hold pencil? Pick a volunteer
  4. Discourage improper pencil grasps: Who can show us one bad way to hold pencil? Pick volunteers
  5. Is it good to hold pencil the bad way? Answer: No
  6. What will happen when one holds pencil the bad way? Answer: He or She will not be able to easily write well and fast. And/or his or her fingers will hurt.
  7. Access their understanding of the difference between left and right: Raise your right/left- hand. Also, sing rhyme such as ‘If You Are Happy and You Know’ with them with emphasize on left hand, right hand, left leg, and right leg.
  8. Practice clockwise hands movement with the pupils: go to circular swing, and rotate in left to right direction; etc. – see previous lesson for more exercises
  9. Practice shading exercise with the pupils:
  10. What is the second step to write like an adult? Answer: Correctly making writing lines (or marks) – i.e. writing patterns
  11. Mention one kind of writing lines? Answer: Straight (writing) lines
  12. What are the kinds of straight (writing) lines? Answer: up to down (standing or vertical); left to right (sleeping or horizontal); and side to side (falling or slanting)
  13. Teacher shows pupils many of the kinds of straight pattern and demands pupils to identify
  14. Re-do making straight writing patterns with the pupils – only one or two exercises for each line.

Revision

Succeeding the exercise above, the teacher once again revises the three straight patterns – vertical, horizontal and slanting.

Afterwards, s/he shows the pupils designed crescent moon. Then the teacher tells the pupils that they shall design their own crescent moon. Also, s/he tells the pupils that there is one last writing lines they need to learn before they begin to write like grown-ups. And finally, the teacher reveals that they shall learn the new writing lines during the week – the line that form the moon which adults also form when writing.

Step 2: Meaning of a curve

In continuation of the lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils that the moon is a curve. Thereafter, s/he explains the meaning of a curve – a curve is a line which is not straight but bent. S/he may teach the pupils to pronounce the word, curve.

The teacher may make the meaning of a curve into a rhyme which s/he sings with the pupils while demonstrating the bend with the hands in the air.

Following the explanation of the meaning of a curve, the teacher draws or shows different curved lines while identifying it for the pupils.

The teacher follows this with exercise of differentiating between straight and curved lines. To do this; the teacher draws or shows a curve and a straight-line side by side then asks the pupils to identify the curve, the straight and/or both lines.  S/he does this in a fun and game-like manner, many times.

As a follow-up to identifying curved lines, the shows real objects – or the picture of the objects – that have curve. Then the teacher identifies the curve in such objects with the pupils. Examples of such objects include moon, rainbow, umbrella, bow, etc. If the models of these objects are available, the teacher places each on the board, and traces the outline so as to make the curve part apparent to the pupils. After the pupils have reasonably become conversant with curves, the teacher may lead them to identify the straight part of the objects as well.

Step 3: Tracing Curved Objects

Succeeding the step above, the teacher distributes a model of curved object which s/he picks – such as the crescent moon. Then, the teacher also picks his model and shows it to the pupils. Telling them to look at him/her, the teacher places the model on the board and traces it to give the outline. The teacher celebrates his new drawing skill with the pupils then teaches them to do same.

The class traces the object (s) as many times as possible to obtain several outlines of the object(s). Note that the pupils may begin tracing the object on the floor before progressing to paper. I recommend that the teacher makes the pupils to trace at least four different objects with the four different curves – concave, convex, upward curve and downward curve. Accordingly, I recommend that the teacher uses 2D cutout of a rainbow, crescent moon, an umbrella and a cup for this exercise. The teacher does this with the pupils gradually.

The teacher ends the drawing exercise with shading of the objects. After creating several outlines of the curved objects – say a crescent moon or a rainbow – the teacher calls the attention of the pupils and then s/he tells them that s/he will now make his/her look like the original – beautify it – by shading. Thereafter, the teacher shades the outlines along the curved path.

After this, s/he teaches the pupils to do the same. Note that the shading should be along the curved path. This is so as to acquaint the pupils’ hands with the curve movement.

Step 4: Forming curved writing patterns

In the concluding part of the lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils to trace and form the actual curved lines.
First, s/he gives the pupils the tracing exercises. The pupils trace the dotted curves with increasing intervals of dots thus:

Exercise 1: Trace the following (click to view larger size)

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 Ex1

Exercise 2: Trace the following

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 Ex2

Exercise 3: Trace the following

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 Ex3

Formation of Curve (Writing Patterns)

Following the tracing exercises, the teacher demonstrates the formation of curve as I have outlined below:

Concave Shape
  1. Mark off two dots such that one is directly above the other. These serve as the starting and end points of the curve
  2. Pre-Writing Pattern – Concave Shape Step 1
    1. Starting from the upper dot, draw a bent line through the right to the lower point.
Pre-Writing Pattern – Concave Shape Step 2
Convex Shape
  1. Mark off two dots such that one is directly above the other. These serve as the starting and end points of the curve.
  2. Pre-Writing Pattern – Convex Shape Step 1
    1. Starting from the upper dot, draw a bent line through the left to the lower point.
Pre-Writing Pattern - Convex Shape Step 2
Pre-Writing Pattern – Convex Shape Step 2
Upward Curve
  1. Mark off two dots along a horizontal path such that the dots are not too spaced nor too close
Pre-Writing Pattern - U-Shape Step 1
Pre-Writing Pattern – U-Shape Step 1
  1. Starting from either of the dots through the bottom, draw a bent line to join the other dot
Pre-Writing Pattern - U-Shape Step 2
Pre-Writing Pattern – U-Shape Step 2
Downward Curve
  1. Mark off two dots along a horizontal line such that the dots are not too spaced nor too close
Pre-Writing Pattern - U-Shape Step 1
Pre-Writing Pattern – N-Shape Step 1
  1. Starting from either of the dots through the top, draw a bent line to join the other dot.
Pre-Writing Pattern - N-Shape Step 2
Pre-Writing Pattern – N-Shape Step 2
GENERAL NOTE:

Curves are of especial difficulty for children to make. Hence, the teacher needs to demonstrate repeatedly while the pupils also practice accordingly for them to be able to make the patterns. For this reason, too, as well as the fact that the topic is two-week long; I recommend that you teach each of concave, convex, upward and downward curves on separate days.

SUMMARY & EVALUATION

Prior to evaluating the pupils’ understanding and subsequent conclusion of the lesson, the teacher summarizes the entire lesson into questions and answers; which s/he revises with the pupils many times:

Revision Questions and Answers

  1. Who like to be able to write like adults so they can write about the things they want?
  2. What is the first step to be able to write well? Answer: Holding pencil well
  3. Invite a pupil to demonstrate correct (tripod) pencil grasp: Who can show us the correct way to hold pencil? Pick a volunteer
  4. Discourage improper pencil grasps: Who can show us one bad way to hold pencil? Pick volunteers
  5. Is it good to hold pencil the bad way? Answer: No
  6. What will happen when one holds pencil the bad way? Answer: He or She will not be able to easily write well and fast. And/or his or her fingers will hurt.
  7. Access their understanding of the difference between left and right: Raise your right/left- hand. Also, sing rhyme such as ‘If You Are Happy and You Know’ with them with emphasize on left hand, right hand, left leg, and right leg.
  8. Practice clockwise hands movement with the pupils: go to circular swing, and rotate in left to right direction; etc. – see previous lesson for more exercises
  9. Practice shading exercise with the pupils:
  10. What is the second step to write like an adult? Answer: Correctly making writing lines (or marks) – i.e. writing patterns
  11. Mention one kind of writing lines? Answer: Straight (writing) lines
  12. What are the kinds of straight (writing) lines? Answer: up to down (standing or vertical); left to right (sleeping or horizontal); and side to side (falling or slanting)
  13. Teacher shows pupils many of the kinds of straight pattern and demands pupils to identify
  14. Re-do making straight writing patterns with the pupils – only one or two exercises for each line.

Lesson Summary Questions and Answers/Exercises

  1. What is a curve? Answer: A curve is a line which is bent.
  2. What are the kinds of curve? Right curve, left curve, up curve & down curve – demonstration with pupils. If possible, make into a rhyme and recite with them
  3. Practice formation of curve in the air: who can show (make the sign for) us right (left, up, or down) curve? Pick a volunteer and practice after him or her.
  4. Which writing line has a rainbow (show the poster)? Answer: up curve
  5. Which writing line has a moon (show the image)? Answer: Right curve
  6. Identify the lines that form the objects below (show colorful 2D design/image)
Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 - Evaluation Exercise img 1
Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 – Evaluation Exercise img 1

Exercise 1: Trace the dots to form the objects then shade very well with color

Evaluation Exercise Image 2
Evaluation Exercise Image 2

Exercise 2: Trace the dots to form the curved lines

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 Ex3
Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 Ex3

Exercise 3: Trace the following

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 - Evaluation Exercise img 3
Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 – Evaluation Exercise img 3

Exercise 4: Join the dots to form left curves

Evaluation Exercise Image 4
Evaluation Exercise Image 4

Exercise 5: Join the dots to form right curves

Evaluation Exercise Image 5
Evaluation Exercise Image 5

Exercise 6: Join the dots to form down curves

Evaluation Exercise Image 6
Evaluation Exercise Image 6

Exercise 7: join the dots to form up curves

Evaluation Exercise Image 7
Evaluation Exercise Image 7 (click to view larger image)

Exercise 8: Copy down

Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 - Evaluation Exercise img 8
Lesson Note – Nursery First Term Pre-Writing Activities Week 7 & 8 – Evaluation Exercise img 8

 

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by marking the pupils’ notes and giving them appropriate feedback – as well as for parents too, if necessary.

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 11

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 11

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 11; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National CurriculumNOTE:  I wrote an extensive article 0on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified. Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 11

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 10; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Children Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.


Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 11

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 11

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting and writing numbers 1 – 50

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 50
    • Identify numbers 1 – 50
    • Arrange numbers 1 – 50 in a given order
    • Identify missing numbers
  • Psychomotor:
    • Write numbers 1 – 50
    • Fill in missing numbers
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 50

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Identification and counting of shapes
  4. Copying numbers 1 – 10
  5. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 50

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Triangle, rectangle, square and circle model
  2. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  3. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  4. Stand counters of 50 beads
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 4 and a half (i.e. 45) for each pupil
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 50
  8. Flash Cards of numbers 1 – 50
  9. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  10. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  11. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  12. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  13. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

1.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

                                                                                      i.      Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board

Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson

  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  2. Story

 

  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 5
  2. Many

 

  1. Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  2. One

 

  1. How do we write zero?

 

  1. 0
  2. 2

 

  1. One bundle of number is called ___________

 

  1. Ten
  2. Seven

 

  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

 

  1. 10
  2. 13

 

  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

 

  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 47 is called ____________

 

  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 43 is called __________

 

  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Two tens and 7 is called __________

 

  1. Twenty-seven
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Which is more, 19 or 28?

 

  1. 19
  2. 28

 

  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

 

  1. Musa
  2. Eze

 

  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is 46 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 packets of chalk
  3. Count the pieces of chalk, how many are there in 1 packet?
  4. Write 8
  5. Write 9
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 45 counters
  7. Which shape has 3 sides?
  8. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
  9. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
  10. Mention the shape that has no corner

Ø  S/he revises the previous lesson

  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 45; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 45, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Four tens (bundles) is called forty. Forty is written as 40.
  11. Shape means how something looks like when the out lines are joined
  12. There are many types of shapes – that means, different things can look in different ways when their out lines are joined
  13. Examples of shapes are rectangle (show), square (show), triangle (show) and circle (show)
  14. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn a few more numbers and revise how to write numbers 1 – 10. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

                                                                                      i.      Recognizing Numbers 1 – 50

Following the introduction, the teacher revises the concept, values and symbols of numbers 1 – 50 as I discussed in the previous lessons.

                                                                                   ii.      Counting Exercise

Succeeding the revision above, the teacher leads the pupils to repeat the counting exercises.

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 50 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

NOTE: The teacher may make the counting into rhymes to aid memorization. S/he may begin that with common counting rhymes such as one, two, buckle my shoes, one two three four five, once I caught a fish alive, etc.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class
  4. Pick a currency note (one of N5, N10, N20 and N50), and ask the pupils how much is it.
  5. Combine any two of the currency notes and ask the pupils how much is the two notes together
  6. Get a voluminous book, open to certain page; ask the pupils what page is that?
  7. Look out for numbers in everyday life and ask what number there are – clock, shoe size, etc.
  8. Mix up several of the shapes you discussed in the last lesson and ask pupils to identify and count
  9. Give them the exercises in the worksheet
    1. Count and circle

Revise recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 50

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-50.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.
  • Forty (4 tens and nothing) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 40.
  • Forty-one (4 and 1) is a number which means _______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 41.
  • Forty-five (4 and 5) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 45.
  • Forty-six (4 and 6) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 46.
  • Fifty (5 and 0) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 50.

NOTE: The teacher uses the concrete number models, charts and white/black board to demonstrate each number.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 50, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 50, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Ordering of Numbers 1 – 50

Succeeding the revision of the symbols of numbers 1 – 50, the teacher teaches the pupils the concept of ordering of numbers.

S/he explains displays the number charts (1 – 50) and reminds the pupils that the numbers show the size – quantity – of things. The teacher explicitly explains that the size is according to the arrangements of the numbers.

Ascending Order

The teacher draws/displays the vertical number line and explains that the first number which is at the bottom – i.e. zero – is the smallest of all numbers. It means nothing – This means if you have zero, then you do not have anything at all.

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 11

Moving upward to number 1, the teacher explains that just as number one is above zero in the number line, so is the size more than zero. S/he repeats for subsequent numbers upward. This should lead to the general rule that as you move up, the size of number increases – from smallest to biggest.

Descending Order

Building on the concept of ascending order, the teacher explains that as you come down, the size of the numbers reduces. Hence, 50 is greater than 49; 49 than 48; 48 than 47; 47 than 46; etc.

Stage Evaluation

Before proceeding to the rest part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the order of numbers. The teacher does this through the following activities:

1.  Find the number in wrong order

The teacher writes numbers 1 – 50 on the board but mixes up the order. Then s/he asks the pupils to find the numbers in the wrong order.

2.  Rearrange the numbers in the correct order

S/he writes numbers within the range of 1 and 50 on the board but in the wrong order. Then asks the pupils to identify the numbers in the wrong order and also to say where the number (s) ought to be.

3.  Fill in missing number

The teacher may write numbers within a given range – not more than 50 – but deliberately omitting some numbers within the range. Then s/he asks the pupils to asks the pupils to say the missing number – which either the pupil(s) or the teacher fills in the space(s).

 

NOTE: These exercises should first be done on the board several times. Also make it interactive and fun. The same exercise will be given in their workbook.

 

 i.      Writing numbers 1 – 50

In the final part of the lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to write numbers 1 – 50.

First, s/he revises the exercises on recognizing numbers 1 – 50; counting and recognition of the symbols in that order.

Next, the teacher makes the pupils to understand the general rule of progression in writing numbers – inductively:

  1. Write numbers 1 – 50 in 10 by 5 table
0123456789
10111213141516171819
20212223242526272829
30313233343536373839
40414243444546474849
50 
  1. Explain the pattern of the numbers – that they only have to remember 0 – 9; after 9, they simply write 1 bundle and nothing; then continue with 1 bundle and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, & 9 again. One more than 1 bundle and 9, they go to 2 bundles and nothing; then 2 bundles and 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 & 9; and so on.

Once the pupils have understood the pattern, the teacher asks if any pupil could write 0 – 9 offhand. If there is volunteer, the teacher allows the pupil to write 0 – 9 on the board. Once the pupil has done this, the teacher applauds him/her then encourages and assures the entire class that they could as well. Hence, s/he makes all of the pupils to write numbers 0 – 9 on their paper offhand. The teacher ensures that every child participates – s/he supports those that may need assistance.

Then gradually, the teacher makes the pupils to write numbers 1 – 50 offhand after the style in 0 – 9 and in intervals of 0 – 9, 10 – 19, 20 – 29, 30 – 39, and 40 – 50.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -50. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Shape Recognition and Counting

  1. Teacher draws or shows the pupils each of the shapes and asks them the name of the shapes – one at a time.
  2. S/he shows the pupils common objects with the shapes that was discussed and demands the pupils to identify the shapes
  3. Mix up many of the shape models and ask the pupils to pick and count all of a named shape
  4. Show the car model below and ask the pupils to identify the shapes
  5. S/he may give them to build
  6. Give them the exercises in the accompanying worksheet
    1. count shape and circle exercise
    2. shape matching exercise
    3. Which shape has 3 sides?
    4. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
    5. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
    6. Mention the shape that has no corner

Exercise 3: Recognition of numbers 1 – 50

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 50; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • S/he gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.
  • Ask the pupils the names of numbers on common surfaces – book pages, clock, currency note, etc.

Exercise 4: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
    • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
    • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
    • Fill in missing number

Exercise 5: Writing Exercise

  1. The teacher gives the pupils the writing exercise in the worksheet that comes with this note.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 10

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 10

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 10; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National CurriculumNOTE:  I wrote an extensive article 0on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified. Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 10

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 10; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Children Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.


Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 10

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 10

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 50

Recognition of numbers 1 – 50

Copying Numbers 1 – 10

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 50
    • Identify numbers 1 – 50
  • Psychomotor:
    • Copy numbers 1 – 10
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 50

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Identification and counting of shapes
  4. Tracing numbers 1 – 10
  5. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 45

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Triangle, rectangle, square and circle model
  2. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  3. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  4. Stand counters of 45 beads
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 4 and a half (i.e. 45) for each pupil
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 45
  8. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  9. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  10. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  11. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  12. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board7
Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson
  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  2. Story

 

  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 5
  2. Many

 

  1. Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  2. One

 

  1. How do we write zero?

 

  1. 0
  2. 2

 

  1. One bundle of number is called ___________

 

  1. Ten
  2. Seven

 

  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

 

  1. 10
  2. 13

 

  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

 

  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 25 is called ____________

 

  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 18 is called __________

 

  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Two tens and 3 is called __________

 

  1. Twenty-three
  2. Thirteen

 

  1. Which is more, 9 or 8?

 

  1. 9
  2. 8

 

  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

 

  1. Musa
  2. Eze

 

  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  3. Count numbers 1 – 25
  4. Write 8
  5. Write 9
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 45 counters
  7. Which shape has 3 sides?
  8. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
  9. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
  10. Mention the shape that has no corner
Ø  S/he revises the previous lesson
  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 45; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 45, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Four tens (bundles) is called forty. Forty is written as 40.
  11. Shape means how something looks like when the out lines are joined
  12. There are many types of shapes – that means, different things can look in different ways when their out lines are joined
  13. Examples of shapes are rectangle (show), square (show), triangle (show) and circle (show)
  14. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn a few more numbers and revise how to write numbers 1 – 10. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Step 2: Recognizing Numbers 1 – 50

Following the introduction, the teacher revises the concept, values and symbols of numbers 1 – 45 as I discussed in the previous lessons. Thereafter, the teacher progresses to numbers 46 – 50.

Number 46
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 45 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction – question 20.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils five bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 5 filled packs and one half-filled pack.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 4 bundles and a half (or 5). In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 4 bundles and 5– i.e. 4 tens and five or forty-five.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 45 items and gets one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 4 bundles (tens) and 6. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 4 bundles (tens) and 6 as 46 – 4 and 6 close to each other. And we call it forty-six. S/he pronounces forty-six and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 47
  1. After explaining number 46, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 46!
  2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 46 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 4 bundles (tens) and 7. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 4tens and 7 as 47 – 4 and 7 close to each other. And we call it forty-seven. S/he pronounces forty-seven and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
  3. Number 48 & 49

    The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 48 and 49.

    Number 50
    1. After the teacher has finished explaining number 49. S/he directs the pupils to arrange the 9 counters left in the fifth bundle pack.
    2. Once the pupils have finished arranging, the teacher asks whether the pack is completely filled. The pupils should probably notice that the pack can still take one more counter. Hence, the teacher explains that since the fifth pack is not completely filled, they cannot say 5 bundles just yet. Instead, they count and say the incomplete counters individually – the teacher directs them to unpack the incomplete counters and count it once again. After counting it as nine, the teacher reminds them that they have 4 bundles and 9 – which is the same as 4tens and 9 or forty-nine.
    3. Thereafter, the gives each of the pupils one more counter. After that, s/he directs them to refill the fifth bundle pack once more. Once the pupils have finished filling the fifth pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is completely filled. The pupils should answer yes.
    4. Hence, the teacher explains that since the fifth pack is now completely filled and there is nothing left, we say the total number of counters is 5 bundles and nothing. And 5 bundles are the same thing as four tens. S/he concludes that we write 5tens and nothing as 50 – 5 and 0 close to each other – and call it as fifty.
    5. Thence, the teacher pronounces fifty and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her several times.

Step 3: Counting Exercise

Succeeding the revision above, the teacher leads the pupils to repeat the counting exercises.

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 50 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count
Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

NOTE: The teacher may make the counting into rhymes to aid memorization. S/he may begin that with common counting rhymes such as one, two, buckle my shoes, one two three four five, once I caught a fish alive, etc.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class
  4. Pick a currency note (one of N5, N10, N20 and N50), and ask the pupils how much is it.
  5. Combine any two of the currency notes and ask the pupils how much is the two notes together
  6. Get a voluminous book, open to certain page; ask the pupils what page is that?
  7. Look out for numbers in everyday life and ask what number there are – clock, shoe size, etc.
  8. Mix up several of the shapes you discussed in the last lesson and ask pupils to identify and count
  9. Give them the exercises in the worksheet
    1. Count and circle

Step 4: Revise recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 50

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-50.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.
  • Forty (4 tens and nothing) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 40.
  • Forty-one (4 and 1) is a number which means _______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 41.
  • Forty-five (4 and 5) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 45.
  • Forty-six (4 and 6) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 46.
  • Fifty (5 and 0) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 50.

NOTE: The teacher uses the concrete number models, charts and white/black board to demonstrate each number.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 50, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 50, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Step 5: Copying Numbers 1 – 10

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now revise how to write numbers 1 – 10.

The teacher first revises the writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus.

For each number:

  1. Identify the patterns that forms the number
  2. Reminds the pupils the steps to form and join the patterns to form the number
  3. Make the pupils write the number on air/in sand
  4. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
    1. Join the dots to form the number
    2. Trace the outline of the numbers
  5. Following the tracing exercise, the teacher gives them the copying exercise in their workbook
    1. Copy down

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -50. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Shape Recognition and Counting

  1. Teacher draws or shows the pupils each of the shapes and asks them the name of the shapes – one at a time.
  2. S/he shows the pupils common objects with the shapes that was discussed and demands the pupils to identify the shapes
  3. Mix up many of the shape models and ask the pupils to pick and count all of a named shape
  4. Show the car model below and ask the pupils to identify the shapes
  5. Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 10S/he may give them to build
  6. Give them the exercises in the accompanying worksheet
    1. count shape and circle exercise
    2. shape matching exercise
    3. Which shape has 3 sides?
    4. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
    5. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
    6. Mention the shape that has no corner

Exercise 3: Recognition of numbers 1 – 50

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 50; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • S/he gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.
  • Ask the pupils the names of numbers on common surfaces – book pages, clock, currency note, etc.

Exercise 4: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
    • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
    • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
    • Fill in missing number

Exercise 5: Tracing Exercise

  1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number for numbers 1 – 10 followed by copying

CONCLUSION of Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 10

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 8; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National CurriculumNOTE:  I wrote an extensive article 0on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified. Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 9

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 8; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Children Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.


Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:

    • Count numbers 1 – 45
    • Identify numbers 1 – 45
    • Identify triangle, rectangle, square and circle
  • Psychomotor:

    • Tracing numbers 1 – 10
    • Arrange the shapes to build a house
  • Affective

    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 45
    • Demonstrate orderliness

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Tracing numbers 9 & 10
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 45

Instructional Materials

  1. Triangle, rectangle, square and circle model
  2. Water gum
  3. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  4. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  5. Stand counters of 45 beads
  6. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 4 and a half (i.e. 45) for each pupil
  7. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  8. Number charts of 1 – 45
  9. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  10. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  11. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department (KERD).
  12. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  13. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board
Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson
  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  2. Story

 

  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 5
  2. Many

 

  1. Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  2. One

 

  1. How do we write zero?

 

  1. 0
  2. 2

 

  1. One bundle of number is called ___________

 

  1. Ten
  2. Seven

 

  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

 

  1. 10
  2. 13

 

  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

 

  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 25 is called ____________

 

  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 18 is called __________

 

  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Two tens and 3 is called __________

 

  1. Twenty-three
  2. Thirteen

 

  1. Which is more, 9 or 8?

 

  1. 9
  2. 8

 

  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

 

  1. Musa
  2. Eze

 

  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  3. Count numbers 1 – 25
  4. Write 8
  5. Write 9
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 30 counters
Ø  Teacher shows the pupils a house model – made of the shapes to be learned; then asks the pupils what model it is. After identifying it, s/he tells them a story that portrays a need for building a house. Hence, the teacher relates the story to the house by telling the pupils that the model is how the house looked like. And also that they are going to build a house to meet the need.
Ø  The teacher explains that before they proceed however, they have to revise what they learned in the previous lesson and also a few new things. Hence, s/he revises the previous lesson
  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 45; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 45, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Four tens (bundles) is called forty. Forty is written as 40.
  11. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall practice more of how to write numbers 9 and 10. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Step 2: Revising Numbers 1 – 45

Following the introduction, the teacher revises the concept, values and symbols of numbers 1 – 45 as I discussed in the previous lessons.

Step 3: Counting Exercise

Succeeding the revision above, the teacher leads the pupils to repeat the counting exercises.

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 45 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count
Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

NOTE: The teacher may make the counting into rhymes to aid memorization. S/he may begin that with common counting rhymes such as one, two, buckle my shoes, one two three four five, once I caught a fish alive, etc.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class
  4. Pick a currency note (one of N5, N10 and N20), and ask the pupils how much is it.
  5. Combine N5 and N10 and ask the pupils how much is the two notes together
  6. Get a voluminous book, open to certain page; ask the pupils what page is that?
  7. Look out for numbers in everyday life and ask what number there are – clock, shoe size, etc.

Step 4: Identification of shapes

Subsequent to the counting exercise, the teacher teaches the pupils to identify the shapes for the week. S/he displays the house model once more – the model should be made of the shapes in such manner that each shape has different colour from every other.

Upon displaying the model, the teacher asks the pupils what was used to build the house – probably cardboard paper, plastic or similarly and suitable material. After, identifying the material; the teacher makes the pupils how many pieces of the material was used – this, s/he invites the pupils to come up and count the parts (pieces of material) of the model.

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9 img 1

After counting the parts of the model, the teacher asks the pupils which of the parts look alike. The pupils may identify the like either by colour or shape. Whichever, it is the same and acceptable: 6 & 4 are alike while 5 and 1 are also alike.

Succeeding this grouping, the teacher asks how the pupils identified the parts that are the same – what makes them realize that the parts are the same? They should say colour or shape – how the parts look or something in the manner. Once this happens, the teacher appreciates the pupil(s) and then explains the meaning of shape as in the following:

What is shape?

The teacher explains shape means how something looks like when the out lines are joined. To further demonstrate the meaning of shape, the teacher takes a rectangular object, places it on the board and draw the outline – the line round it. Thereafter, s/he tells the pupils – pointing to the outline on the board – that the look of that outline is called shape.

Types of shapes

After explaining the meaning of shape, the teacher explains further that there are many types of shapes – that means, different things can look in different ways when their out lines are joined. S/he continues that the different kinds of shape have different names. Hence, the teacher tells the pupils that the name of the shape on the board – outline of the rectangular object – is called rectangle.

Succeeding this, the teacher identifies the other kinds of shapes in steps thus:

Rectangle
  1. Pick a perfect rectangular object
  2. Place it on the board
  3. Trace the outline
  4. Tell the pupils that the shape – outline – is called rectangle
  5. Pronounce rectangle many times and let the pupils pronounce after you each time
  6. Tell the pupils that a rectangle has 2 long sides and 2 short sides
Square
  1. Pick a perfect square object
  2. Place it on the board
  3. Trace the outline
  4. Tell the pupils that the shape – outline – is called square.
  5. Pronounce square many times and let the pupils pronounce after you each time
  6. Tell the pupils that a square has 4 equal sides
Differentiate between Rectangle and Square
  1. While both rectangle and square are on the board, the teacher asks the pupils if both are the same
  2. S/he clarifies that the two shapes are not the same
  3. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils what make the two shapes different
  4. After taking enough attempts – of which there may be correct answer, s/he tells the pupils the differences between rectangle and square:
    1. The two shapes are alike because both have 4 sides
    2. However, the shapes are different because while, all the 4 sides of a square are equal; those of rectangle are not.
    3. Square has 4 equals sides
    4. Rectangle has 2 long sides and 2 short sides
Triangle
  1. Pick a triangular object
  2. Place it on the board
  3. Trace the outline of the object
  4. Tell the pupils that the shape – outline – is called
  5. Pronounce triangle many times and let the pupils repeat after you each time
  6. Tell the pupils that a triangle has 3 sides
Circle
  1. Pick a circular object
  2. Place it on the board
  3. Trace the outline of the object
  4. Tell the pupils that the shape – outline – is called circle.
  5. Pronounce circle many times and let the pupils repeat after you each time
  6. Tell them that a circle is one closed curve and that it has no corners

After teaching the pupils all of the shapes, s/he may make it into rhymes which s/he sings with the pupils.

Step 5: Recognizing and Counting Shapes

After identifying the types of shapes, the teacher teaches the pupils to identify and count the number of shapes.

First, s/he refer to the house model; picks one of the shapes – i.e. part of the model – and asks the pupils to identify the shape by calling the name. Thereafter, the teacher asks the pupils how many of each shape is in the model.

Shapes in common objects

Subsequent to the pupils’ identifying and counting the shapes that make up the model, the teacher shows them everyday objects that have the shapes discussed; then s/he asks the pupils to identify the shapes and count how many of them are there. Examples of such things include door, books, windows, white/black board, desk, tin and cans, candy cubes, the classroom, etc.

Building Exercise

Succeeding the counting of the parts of the models, the teacher gives the pupils a pack of the shape models then directs the pupils to count each of the shapes that is present in the mix.

Following this, the teacher re-displays the house model. Thence, s/he explains that when we arrange things, they become beautiful. referencing the house model, the teacher explains that the model is beautiful and become useful only because the shapes are well arranged. The teacher continues that therefore; the pupils should learn to arrange things that are useful to them. The teacher stresses this and then leads the pupils to create the house model.

Steps to build the house model
  1. Count the number of shapes that is in the model
  2. Pick the shapes from the pack
  3. Arrange the shapes as in the model
  4. Gum the arrangement

After demonstrating the steps to build the house, the teacher directs and guide the pupils to do the same. The teacher ensures that the activity is interactive.

Stage Evaluation

Before proceeding to the rest part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of shapes. S/he does this by asking/giving them the following questions/exercises:

  1. Teacher draws or shows the pupils each of the shapes and asks them the name of the shapes – one at a time.
  2. S/he shows the pupils common objects with the shapes that was discussed and demands the pupils to identify the shapes
  3. Mix up many of the shape models and ask the pupils to pick and count all of a named shape
  4. Show the car model below and ask the pupils to identify the shapes
  5. S/he may give them to build
  6. Give them the exercises in the accompanying worksheet
    1. count shape and circle exercise
    2. shape matching exercise
    3. Which shape has 3 sides?
    4. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
    5. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
    6. Mention the shape that has no corner

Step 6: Revise recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 45

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-45.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.
  • Forty (4 tens and nothing) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 40.
  • Forty-one (4 and 1) is a number which means _______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 41.
  • Forty-five (4 and 5) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 25.

NOTE: The teacher uses the concrete number models, charts and white/black board to demonstrate each number.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 45, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 45, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Step 7: Tracing Numbers 1 – 10

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now revise how to write numbers 1 – 10.

The teacher first revises the writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus.

For each number:

  1. Identify the patterns that forms the number
  2. Reminds the pupils the steps to form and join the patterns to form the number
  3. Make the pupils write the number on air/in sand
  4. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
    1. Join the dots to form the number
    2. Trace the outline of the numbers
  5. EVALUATION of pupils’ understanding of Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9

    The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

    Exercise 1: Oral counting

    The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -45. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

  6. Exercise 2: Shape Recognition and Counting

    1. Teacher draws or shows the pupils each of the shapes and asks them the name of the shapes – one at a time.
    2. S/he shows the pupils common objects with the shapes that was discussed and demands the pupils to identify the shapes
    3. Mix up many of the shape models and ask the pupils to pick and count all of a named shape
    4. Show the car model below and ask the pupils to identify the shapes
    5. S/he may give them to build
    6. Give them the exercises in the accompanying worksheet
      1. count shape and circle exercise
      2. shape matching exercise
      3. Which shape has 3 sides?
      4. Which shape has 2 short sides and 2 long sides?
      5. What is the name of the shape that has 4 equal sides?
      6. Mention the shape that has no corner
  7. Exercise 3: Recognition of numbers 1 – 45

    • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 45; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
    • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
    • S/he gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.
    • Ask the pupils the names of numbers on common surfaces – book pages, clock, currency note, etc.

    Exercise 4: Numerical Values

    • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
    • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
    • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
      • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
      • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
    1. count and circle the greater/lesser
      • Fill in missing number

    Exercise 5: Tracing Exercise

    1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number for numbers 1 – 10

    CONCLUSION

    The teacher concludes the Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 9 by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

    Feedback format:

    1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
    2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
    3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
    4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
    5. Suggest how the parents can help

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 8

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Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 8

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 8; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National CurriculumNOTE:  I wrote an extensive article 0on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified. Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 8

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 8; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Children Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson Note Nursery One Third Term Mathematics Week 8


Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 8

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 45

Copying numbers 9 & 10

Recognition of numbers 1 – 45

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 45
    • Identify numbers 1 – 45
  • Psychomotor:
    • Copy numbers 9 & 10
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 45

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Tracing numbers 9 & 10
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 45

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 45 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 4 and a half (i.e. 45) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 45
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board
Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson
  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  2. Story

 

  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 5
  2. Many

 

  1. Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  2. One

 

  1. How do we write zero?

 

  1. 0
  2. 2

 

  1. One bundle of number is called ___________

 

  1. Ten
  2. Seven

 

  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

 

  1. 10
  2. 13

 

  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

 

  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 25 is called ____________

 

  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 18 is called __________

 

  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Two tens and 3 is called __________

 

  1. Twenty-three
  2. Thirteen

 

  1. Which is more, 9 or 8?

 

  1. 9
  2. 8

 

  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

 

  1. Musa
  2. Eze

 

  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  3. Count numbers 1 – 25
  4. Write 3
  5. Write 4
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 30 counters
Ø  Teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort
Ø  Revises the previous lesson
  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 40; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 40, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Four tens (bundles) is called forty. Forty is written as 40.
  11. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn how to write numbers 9 and 10. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Step 2: Recognizing Numbers 1 – 45

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 45. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 40 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 41 – 45

After explaining numbers 40, the teacher continues to numbers 41 – 45 as follows:

Number 41
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 40 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction – question 20.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils five bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 4 completely filled packs.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 4 bundles. In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 4 bundles– i.e. 4 tens or forty.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 40 items and gets one more – s/he distributes one counter each to the pupils; then we say the person now has 4 bundles (tens) and 1. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 4 bundles (tens) and 1 as 41 – 4 and 1 close to each other. And we call it forty-one. S/he pronounces forty-one and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 42
  1. After explaining number 41, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 41!
  2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 41 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to each of the pupils; then we say the person now has 4 bundles (tens) and 2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 4tens and 2 as 42 – 4 and 2 close to each other. And we call it forty-two. S/he pronounces forty-two and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
Number 43 to 45

The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 43 to 45.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 45. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
  2. Two tens are called ____________
  3. 40 is called _________
  4. 43 is called ___________
  5. How do we write 2tens and 4? ___________
  6. How is 3tens and 4 called? _______________
  7. Franca has 41 oranges. Judith has 31. Who has more? __________
  8. Franca gave one of his oranges to Judith. How many has Franca left? How many has Judith now?
  9. What is 42 in local dialect?
  10. What is forty-four (teacher says in local dialect) in English Language?
  11. 4 tens and nothing is called __________
  12. Which is greater/less?
  13. Circle the greater
  14. Teacher asks the pupils to look under their shoes and see their shoe sizes. Then then compare with other pupils.
  15. Play Shopping Game:
    1. Items – box of model items in children store (that cost not more than N45), model wallet, and model mint in common denomination not more than 45 – i.e. N5, N10 & N20
    2. One student acts as storekeeper, when others buy from the student. This will enable them to put the concept of number into practice.

Reminder: For oral questions, you may reword the question into a form that will be easiest understood by the pupils – you may translate to local dialect. But insist the pupils give answers in English except where you want otherwise. That being said, sometimes the pupils may know the answer in local dialect but not in English. You should apply leniency.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 45 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Step 3: Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 45 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count
Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class
  4. Pick a currency note (one of N5, N10 and N20), and ask the pupils how much is it.
  5. Combine N5 and N10 and ask the pupils how much is the two notes together
  6. Get a voluminous book, open to certain page; ask the pupils what page is that?
  7. Look out for numbers in everyday life and ask what number there are – clock, shoe size, etc.

Step 4: Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 45

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-45.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.
  • Forty (4 tens and nothing) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 40.
  • Forty-one (4 and 1) is a number which means _______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 41.
  • Forty-five (4 and 5) is a number which means _________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 25.

NOTE: The teacher uses the concrete number models, charts and white/black board to demonstrate each number.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 45, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 45, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Step 5: Copying Numbers 9 and 10

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write two more numbers – 9 and 10.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus:

Copying number 9
  1. The teacher identifies the patterns that forms number 9:

Number 9 has two patterns – a curve and a vertical line.

 

[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3544″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3545″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]NOTE: The teacher shows the pupils each concrete pattern as s/he identifies it. Also, the nine could be two curves but the one above will be far easier for the pupils to form.

  1. Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number nine, they first make the curve; then the a vertical[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3546″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3547″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]NOTE: The teacher arranges the concrete patterns to form the number as s/he explains

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own
  4. Then the teacher makes three points at each of the joints/vertexes of the number and asks the pupils to join them with appropriate pattern
  5. Succeeding this exercising, the teacher gives the pupils their 2D copying exercise on number 5.
Copying Number 10
  1. The teacher identifies the patterns that forms the number:

Number ten is two different numbers written close to each other. One is a single vertical line and zero is a closed curve. Zero could also be two curves. 0[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”3548″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”3549″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][vc_gallery interval=”3″ images=”3550,3551″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]NOTE: most children are able to form zero as continuous curve. However, forming it as two curves produces better zero for beginners. You should start with the continuous curve. If you find any child finding it difficult, then you may introduce the child to the two curves.

 

  1. Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

 

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number ten, first of all make the vertical line, give just a little space and then the zero as I show below:[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3552″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_single_image image=”3553″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own
  4. Then the teacher makes points at each of the vertexes of the number and asks the pupils to join them with appropriate pattern
  5. Succeeding this exercising, the teacher gives the pupils their 2D copying exercise on number 5.

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”DOWNLOAD THIS LESSON NOTE” color=”danger” size=”lg” align=”center” i_align=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-download” button_block=”true” add_icon=”true” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.achievablecpmrevenue.com%2Fbu7n5m6g%3Fkey%3Def29e9e949ba8d9d246c383d4c2b4cc3||target:%20_blank|”][vc_column_text]

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -45. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 45

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 45; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • S/he gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.
  • Ask the pupils the names of numbers on common surfaces – book pages, clock, currency note, etc.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
    • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
    • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
    • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Copying Exercise

  1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number 9, 1 and zero before 10

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help

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Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8

Introduction Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 8

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 8; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National CurriculumNOTE:  I wrote an extensive article 0on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified. Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to develop Lesson Plan from Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 8

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only. Or click here to get it from paystack.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.


Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 8

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 13
  • Recognition of numbers 1 – 9
  • Matching numbers 1 – 5 with objects
  • Writing Pattern – Writing horizontal line

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 13
    • Identify numbers 1 – 9
    • Identify horizontal strokes
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number between 1 and 9
    • Pick up to 13 items from a lot
    • Form/draw horizontal strokes
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 13

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 12
  • Identification of numbers 8 and 9
  • Tracing of horizontal line

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 13 with rhymes.
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 13 counters
  4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 13.
  8. Number 1 – 9 Stencil
  9. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  10. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  11. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  12. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:
    • What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  • Story

 

  • How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 7
  • Many

 

  • Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. True
  • False

 

  • What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  • One

 

  • (Show them any one or two of number 0 – 7 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?
  1. 4
  • 5

 

  • 7 and 6 which is greater?
  1. 7
  • 6

 

  • Who can show us how to write number 8? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand
  • Who can count from 1 to 12? Allow willing pupil(s) to count
  • Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands? Correct answer wins the sweet(s) J
  • How many blades does a ceiling fan has?
  • How many colours does rainbow has?
  • Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 0 – 7? Allow willing pupil to do
  • What is 7 in (local) dialect?
  • Musa (name of a pupil in the class), please go to my desk. Pick six pencils. Bring it to me.
  • Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 12 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).
  1. The teacher thence shows the pupils large colourful painted design of number 13. Then s/he asks the pupils who knows the name. Following the pupils’ attempts, s/he tells them that they shall learn the new number and also create their painted designs during the week.
  2. Following that, the teacher explains that before they learn the new numbers; they have to revise the numbers they have already learned. Therefore, the teacher revises the previous lessons by explaining the following:
    • A number is what tells us how many things we have.
    • There are many numbers because we can have many things.
    • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
    • Teacher displays uses the stand counters, and counts numbers 1 – 12 with the pupils. Thereafter, s/he displays the chart of numbers 1 – 12 – or writes the numbers on the board and leads the oral counting as well. Following this, the teacher names a number and require a
      pupil to come point at it on the chart/board. Thereafter, the teacher revises numbers 1 – 12 as follows.
    • S/he shows the pupils empty hands and asks them how many items has s/he on his/her hands. Pupils should say nothing. Therefore, the teacher explains that nothing is a number. Nothing is called number Zero – teacher reiterates in local dialect that Zero means nothing and makes pupils pronounce zero. Then showing the number design, s/he continues “this is number zero”. (Demonstrating) “Let’s write number zero on air/sand”.
    • Proceeding, the teacher picks one item and shows it to the pupils. Then s/he asks them how many items has s/he in his/her hands. The pupils should say Therefore, the teacher explains that one is a number. One means ____ (in dialect) – everybody pronounces one. (Show model and say) This is number one. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number one on air/sand.
    • The teacher repeats step 6 for numbers 2 up to 9.

Step 2: Concept of Bundles

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten.

Following this, the teacher distributes the pupils’ improvised pack to them. After that, s/he demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Step 3: Concept of the value of number Eleven through thirteen (13)

Number 11

Following the explanation of the number 10, the teacher then teaches that if one already has a bundle and then gets one more – s/he gives them one more counter; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into the bundle pack, we simply say the total number of the items is one bundle and one – which means a ten and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write one bundle and one as 11. S/he also teaches that the number after a bundle therefore is 11. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 11 is called eleven. So, the number after ten is eleven. The teacher pronounces and makes the pupils to pronounce eleven after him/her, several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 11 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 11 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.

Numbers 12

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats the explanations and exercises under 11 for number 12. See summary below.

  1. If one already has 11 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 2 – because there will now be two (extra) items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and two as 12 – one and two close to each other – and call it twelve. Teacher emphasizes on the closeness of the 1 & 2 in twelve in contrast to normal 1, 2, 3.
  3. That means the number after eleven is twelve. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twelve.
  4. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 12 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.
  5. Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 12 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.
Numbers 13

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats the explanations and exercises under 11 and number 12 for number 13. See summary below.

  1. If one already has 12 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to twelve – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 3 – because there will now be three (extra) items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and three as 13 – one and three close to each other – and call it thirteen. Teacher emphasizes on the closeness of the 1 & 3 in thirteen in contrast to normal 1, 2, 3.
  3. That means the number after twelve is thirteen. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce thirteen.
  4. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 13 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.
  5. Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 13 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.
Stage Evaluation Questions

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’

understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the

following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
  2. The number after 9 is __________
  3. Nine is a number. What is nine in ______ (name local) language?
  4. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
  5. Now I give 9 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?
  6. One and two written close together is called _______________
  7. Eleven is one and one. True False

NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect. S/he should allow volunteer pupil to count the pencils in Aliyu’s hands. Note that Aliyu stands for a pupil in the class – ensure to use the child’s name.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 12; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 12 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Step 4: Counting Exercises

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count
Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 13 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 up to 11, 12

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 12.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
    2. How many people are sitting on this row?
    3. (Provided there are no more than 12 desks) How many desks do we have in this class?
    4. How many fans do we have in this class?
    5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 12, you should rather ask how many children does your mother has?
  4. Step 5: Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 9

  5. After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. S/he also reminds the pupils that they had learned how we write numbers 8 and 9 in the previous week. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn revise how we write from zero to nine.To do this, the teacher revises the symbols of numbers 1 – 9 as s/he taught them in the previous lessons as follows:
    • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
    • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number one number rhyme.
    • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 2 number rhyme.
    • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 3 number rhyme.
    • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 4 number rhyme.
    • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5. The teacher shows the pupils number 5 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 5 number rhyme.
    • Six is a number. Six means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 6. The teacher shows the pupils number 6 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 6 number rhyme.
    • Seven is a number. Seven means ________ (in local dialect). And we write seven as 7. The teacher shows the pupils number 7 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 7 number rhyme.
    • Eight is a number. Eight means ________ (in local dialect). And we write eight as 8. The teacher shows the pupils number 8 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 8 number rhyme.
    • Nine is a number. Nine means ________ (in local dialect). And we write nine as 9. The teacher shows the pupils number 9 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 9 number rhyme.
    Evaluation

    The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

    1. Lucky Dip –

    Cut several cards and write different numbers ranging from 0 to 9 on the cards. Then pack the cards into a container such as a carton. They may be duplicates of numbers.

    Once the cards are packed into the container, the teacher keeps the container of number cards on the stage and invite the pupils, one at a time, to pick a card after shuffling it. After picking, the pupil looks at the number on the card and call it out. If any child calls out the number on the card correctly, the class claps for the pupil and the teacher gives the pupil equal number of sweets. If any child fails to call the number on the card correctly, the teacher gently declines and offer to appoint another willing pupil to help out. In such case, once a helping child names the number correctly; the teacher shares the supposed compensation between the picker and the helping pupils.

    Note here that the highest number that should be in the container of cards is 9. That way, pupils will be aiming to pick the card bearing number 9.

    Teacher should also take note that container should be closed with a little allowance for free movement of the pupils’ hands in and out of it. If the container is open, then each pupil should be made to look away or close their eyes while picking their card.

    1. Spin Board

    The teacher creates a spin board of clock face with number 1 – 9 and a fixed arrow indicator. Each pupil spins the board to rotate very fast; whichever number that the board stops completely as indicated by the arrow, the pupil gets equivalent number of sweet as reward. If the board stops in-between a number, the number that is just past indicates the pupil’s win.

    1. Number Puzzle/Shazam

    The teacher gets stickers of different number parts (pattern). Then the pupils arrange the pattern that forms number 8 or 9 as the case may be. Alternatively, a mix of different numbers are given to the pupils then they shade the boxes containing number 8 and 9 with given colour.

  6. Step 6: Matching Numbers 4 & 5 with variety of objects

    In the last next of the lesson – which the teacher may teach concurrently with the rest; the teacher aims to achieve the affective objectives for the topic. This is internalization of the concepts of numbers 4 & 5. By this I mean the pupils should not only be able to reel and sing the rhymes of numbers, but also demonstrate understanding of the concept in normal everyday living.

    Hence, after teaching the concepts of numbers 1 – 12 as I have discussed; the teacher ‘challenges’ the pupils with exercises on practical living. S/he does this, first with concrete things, then picture reading and matching of numbers to objects exercise on paper.

    With Concrete Objects

    While the topic lasts – say each day of the week or at two or three intervals per day, the teacher brings a variety of objects to the class. The items should be of varying numbers between 1 – 5. Then the teacher asks the pupils individually – first as planned group activity during the lesson then individually at different times and randomly – to name the object (out of the variety) that is one through five in number.

    Subsequently, the teacher may personalize the questions with each pupil. S/he does this by asking each pupil the number of any of the pupil’s possession that is one through five in number. For example:

    1. How many bag(s) do you have?
    2. Raise three fingers – assuming the pupil knows the meaning of fingers
    3. How many legs do you have?
    4. (In class) Who has two green LEGOS? Etc.
    Assignment to parents

    As part of the feedbacks to parents for the week, the teacher may also tell them the exercise. The parents can help in the challenge by asking pupils during activities at home. The parents are to ask pupils to identify or name the number of objects that the parents already know to be one through four in number. Nonetheless, enjoy the feedbacks of parents who will proudly tell you their child could say things that are moreJ!

    Matching of Numbers 4 & 5 with variety of objects during picture reading

    Complimentary to the activities above, the teacher repeats the same challenge during picture reading. For this reason, the teacher collects beautiful pictures of objects – things that appeals to children such as animals (to some), cars (to some), soldiers, cartoon characters, etc – teachers may find out pupils’ interest by asking them or their parents.

    Provided computer/screen is available, the teacher makes these pictures into slides. The pictures should be in such a way that some objects are of varying numbers, but most one through five. If screen is not available, the teacher may print out the picture-reading book. Or where even printer is not available such as in the rural areas, the teacher may get preferred Picture Reading textbook or take the pupils for a walk around the school.

    Then flipping through the pictures, the teacher identifies the objects with the pupils. But wherever the number of the object they are currently looking at is one through five, the teacher asks the pupils how many of the objects are there?

    Take for instance, “Look at this beautiful animal, do you know the name of this animal? Good! Elephant. How many elephants can you see in the picture? Correct! One! Everybody, look at one beautiful elephant”

    Matching of numbers 4 & 5 to objects exercise on paper

    In the last part of the matching of numbers 4 & 5 to objects, the teacher gives the pupils matching exercises on their Mathematics textbook, workbook or exercise books. However, this is after the teacher has taught the pupils how to form the writing pattern for the week (horizontal strokes). Therefore, the teacher should carry out the previous matching exercises while s/he teaches the writing pattern.

    Should there be no Mathematics textbook or workbook with matching exercise available, the teacher can form worksheets or write out the exercises on the pupils’ exercise books.

    To do this, the teacher collects or draws a list of objects of varying number – some, one; some two; others 3’s and others in four’s and five’s – on a column. Then either at the right or left side of objects, the teacher writes out numbers 1 to 5 in another column. The number column should be such that the number of 1’s and 2’s equals the number of objects that are one and two respectively.

    Note that this exercise reinforces the exercises on writing pattern, hence the objects and numbers have to be in column – at least the first exercise, others may be slanting line.

    See sample below.

  7. Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 1
    Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 1
    Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 2
    Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 3
    Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 4
    Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 Exercise 4

     

    NOTE: The objects and numbers are in rows to ensure up and down movement of the writing pattern for the week. For each of the exercises, the teacher explains and demonstrate how to solve it to the pupils. The teacher follows this with quick class activities – which the pupils perform under the watch and direction of the teacher. Then s/he duplicates the exercises as many times as possible for individual pupil’s practice – may be home work.

  8. Step 7: Writing Pattern: Forming Horizontal Strokes

  9. In the last part of this lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to form horizontal writing strokes. For guidelines on this, please see my Pre-Writing Lesson Notes.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 12.

Count 1 – 12

Go to the playground. Pick 12 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,12

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 8 & 9

  • The teacher uses the lucky dip box, sends the pupils to go and bring a card bearing number 8 or 9 from the box.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers 8 and/or 9 and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.
    • Point at/touch number 8 & 9
    • Draw line to match numbers to object
    • Shade box containing numbers 8 with red colour and 9 with green colour.
    • Shade box containing eight and nine items

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.

 

  1. Which is greater?
  2. 8 and 9
  3. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  4. Fill in missing number
  5. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

Exercise 4: Matching Numbers to Objects

More exercises as I discussed during the lesson.

Number stickers

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the Lesson Note Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 8 by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

 

 

 

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 4

Introduction to Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 4

I wrote this Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 4 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Nursery Schemes of Work based on the latest 9-YEAR BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM by NERDCClick here to get the Scheme.

Since the SCHEME OF WORK is based on the national curriculum, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the NATIONAL CURRICULUM.

Major Focus of this Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 4

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note for Lesson Plan

I wrote this lesson note in outline of STANDARD LESSON PLANS. However, I advise teachers that want to use this note for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – should get our PROFESSIONAL LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE. The layout of the template makes it easy for teachers to write a professional lesson plan and easily.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, CLICK HERE TO QUICKLY READ OUR ARTICLE ON THEIR DIFFERENCES.

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 4


Class: Pre-Nursery

Term: First

Week: 4

Subject: Social Studies

Topic: Learning the name of the state where the school is located and the governor

OBJECTIVES

  1. Internalize the need for (division of labor) – cooperation.
  2. Mention the name of their country.
  3. Demonstrate sense of citizenship
  4. Mention the name of the state governor.
  5. Identify pictures of the president and the governor

PRESENTATION

1. Introduction – Storytelling

Here are two children: Ibah and Igege

Ibah lives with his parents. Ibah has two brothers and sisters. Igege also lives with his parents. Igege has two brothers and two sisters.

Every day, Ibah wakes up with his family. The family will say their prayers. Then, brothers and sisters will go back to rest and relax while Ibah does all the chores – he sweeps, fetches water, run errands, helps daddy to clean the car and also helps mummy to prepare food. Ibah always sweats profusely while he is working. But his siblings do not do anything or assist him. He is usually tired from the chores. Sometimes, the plenty of work make him sick. Anytime falls sick, the doctor gives him injection.

But it is not like that in Igege’s family. Every day, Igege wakes up with his family. The family will say their prayers. Then everybody will share the work. If Igege is sweeping; his brothers and sisters will do other tasks. Because everbody joins their hands to do the work, the work at Igege’s family is faster. Nobody feels too tired. And everybody is always happy. Igege does not fall sick often. So, the doctor does not give him injection often.

Succeeding the story, the teacher asks the pupils if they would rather be Ibah or Igege.

The pupils will most likely say they would be Igege. Hence, the teacher may ask the reason for picking Igege over Ibah.

Afterwards, the teacher likens the story to public administration. S/he does this with the aid of either:

  1. A video showing large number of people transacting businesses in different areas from across the country – football match, cultural events, markets, bank, schools, church/mosque, etc.; or
  2. Poster of 1 above.

Then displaying the media, for the different states; the teacher first of all describes the media for the pupils. Thereafter, s/he asks the pupils if they know who controls all of these people. In continuation, the teacher explains that s/he will tell them the person that controls all of those people. Hence, s/he proceeds to step 2.

2. The Country & President

a) The Country

First, the teacher teaches that the land in which they live in, and probably most of the people they know live in; is called their country.

Following, s/he teaches the pupils that the name of their country – the land they and they family live in – is called Nigeria.

Following the latest explanation, the teacher makes the point into question and answer. S/he recites same with the pupils to aid memorization:

Teacher (Question): What is the name of your country?

Pupils (Answer): The name of my country is Nigeria.

The teacher recites the above with the pupils many times. Thereafter, the teacher distributes the Nigerian map tag to the pupils and explains that that represents the country – the land they live in. Further, the teacher explains that all good people (children) are expected to love and respect their country. And to show that love, at all times; the pupils should pin the tag on their uniform just like soldiers – whose picture the teacher shows the pupils.

The teacher concludes the lesson with yet another question and answer:

Teacher (Question): What does good people do to their country?

Pupils (Answer): Good people love and respect their country.

Teacher follows this with thorough patriotism talk/exercise(s). The teacher may adapt the second question above in a style as:

Question: What do you do to your country?

Answer: I love my country!!

b) The President

In continuation, the teacher explains that the leader of a country is the president. That is, the president of a country is the person who controls everything and everybody in the country. The teacher explains this thoroughly: How the oversees all the states, ministries and sector of the country. S/he may liken the president to the country as a father is to the family.

Once more, the teacher makes the point into a questions and answers which s/he recites with the pupils many times for memorization.

Stage Evaluation Question

Teacher (Question): Who is a President of a country?

Pupils (Answer): A President of a country is the person who controls everything and everybody in the country.

Following the exercise above, the teacher displays the picture of the president and teaches the pupils the name of the president.

S/he concludes this with recitation of question and answer on the name of the name of the president of the country with the pupils:

Teacher (Question): Who is the president of Nigeria?

Pupils (Answer): The President of Nigeria is President Muhammadu Buhari.

NOTE:

Repetition is the key to teaching children of this age. As such, you should the recite the Questions and Answers with the pupils as many times as possible. Also, make the exercise as much fun as possible. You should also ask individual pupils. Pupils may take up the role of the interviewer. Importantly, if you work in an international environment, make the class inclusive by adapting it to cover other countries. Dynamism is the key here.

3) State & Governor

Succeeding the explanations on country and the president, the teacher teaches the pupils about state and the governor.

To do this, the teacher refers to the introductory story. Then, s/he explains that just like Ibah; there are a lot of work for the president – conceptualize this further for the pupils to understand. And if the president were to do all the work alone, the president will be too tired and will fall sick all the time.

And for this reason, the land (country) is shared into smaller lands for different people to help the president look after. Thence, the teacher explains that the smaller lands inside a country is called states.

Thereafter, the teacher explains that every state has a name and that there are 36 states in Nigeria. In continuation, the teacher explains that the state they are in is called ______________________. Teacher pronounces the name several times while the pupils repeat after him/her. The teacher listens to individual pupil as s/he pronounces so as to ensure all of them are able to pronounce it correctly; and otherwise guide as necessary.

Finally, the teacher explains that the person that help the president to control everybody in a state is called the governor. Then the teacher displays the picture of the state governor and tell the pupils the name as well as how to pronounce it – several times.

The teacher makes the forgoing point into question and answer which s/he recites with the pupils thus:

Stage Evaluation Question

(Teacher) Question: Who is the governor of _______________ state?

(Pupils) Answer: The governor of ______________ state is ______________________________.

The teacher does this with the pupils many times for memorization.

State Capital

In conclusion, the teacher teaches that we call the part of the state where the office of the governor is as the capital of the state. Therefore, the teacher reiterates that there are 36 states and capital in Nigeria. This is when the teacher begins reciting states and capital with the pupils henceforth. Note that the recitation should be gradual – pay attention to the pupils’ pronunciation and correct where and when necessary.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before the teacher continues with the lesson, s/he makes the points from this stage in the lesson into questions and answers which s/he recites with the pupils many times – Click on the questions to see the format of the answer to each question:

  1. What is a state?
    1. A state is a part of a country controlled by a governor
  2. How many states are there in Nigeria?
    1. There are 36 states and the FCT
  3. In which state is your school located?
    1. My school is located in _____________________ state.
  4. Who is the governor of _____________ state?
    1. The governor of ______________ state is __________________.

SUMMARY

Prior to concluding the lesson, the teacher summarizes the entire into a set of questions and answers. The teacher recites this with the pupils several times a day thenceforth:

  1. What is a country?
    1. A country is all the land that we live in is controlled by a president.
  2. What is the name of your country?
    1. The name of my country is Nigeria.
  3. What does good people do to their country?
    1. Good people love and respect their country.
  4. Who is a President of a country?
    1. A President of a country is the person who controls everything and everybody in the country.
  5. Who is the president of Nigeria?
    1. The President of Nigeria is President Muhammadu Buhari.
  6. What is a state?
    1. A state is a part of a country controlled by a governor.
  7. How many states are there in Nigeria?
    1. There are 36 states and the FCT.
  8. In which state is your school located?
    1. My school is located in _____________________ state.
  9. Who is the governor of _____________ state?
    1. The governor of ______________ state is __________________.

EVALUATION

Following the general recitation of the Q & A; the teacher assesses individual pupil’s understanding by asking them the questions orally and recording their answer in their books.

In addition to the questions under summary above, the teacher points at the pictures of the president and governors and asks the pupils to identify.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by marking the oral exercises on their textbook. Then s/he gives appropriate feedback to pupils and their parents – including giving them extra sheets if necessary.

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

Introduction to Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

I wrote this Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Nursery Schemes of Work based on the latest 9-YEAR BASIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM by NERDC. Click here to get the Scheme.

Since the SCHEME OF WORK is based on the national curriculum, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the NATIONAL CURRICULUM.

Major Focus of this Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note for Lesson Plan

I wrote this lesson note in outline of STANDARD LESSON PLANS. However, I advise teachers that want to use this note for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – should get our PROFESSIONAL LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE. The layout of the template makes it easy for teachers to write a professional lesson plan and easily.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, CLICK HERE TO QUICKLY READ OUR ARTICLE ON THEIR DIFFERENCES.

To the Pre-Nursery Social Studies Teacher

This topic lays the foundation to form social skills in young learners in the areas of social interaction, personal security and inculcation of patriotism.

I have often opined that the students of a school are its number one marketing agents (or officers, if you will). This is only possible when the students derive certain feeling of prestige in the school. This induces loyalty. And such ideologies must be formed from the students’ earliest years – in the school. When else is most suitable but at such a period as now when the students are earliest in years as well as in the school?

Teachers should make it a point of duty to sell the school to the young learners in this class. Once they buy the school, it will aid the learners to learn better and also the school to set off on the path to SUSTAINABLE GROWTH.

Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

Class: Pre-Nursery

Term: First

Week: 2 – 3

Subject: Social Studies

Topic: Learning the name of the School – the Proprietor(ress) and Headmaster(mistress)

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Mention the name of the school in response to question or in a dialogue
  • Internalize the need to engage in social interaction
  • (Where pupil can already identify the letters of the alphabet), Spell the name of the school

PRESENTATION of Lesson Note Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

1.  Introduction – Storytelling

The teacher introduces the lesson through a short classroom story that illustrates the objectives of the lesson. CLICK HERE TO SEE THE SHORT CLASSROOM STORY THAT I RECOMMEND.

In telling the story, teachers should note that I deliberately wrote the story in simple sentences to aid easy assimilation. Based on educational psychology, at this age; children find short simple sentences easier to understand than others. Hence, teachers should observe this even while narrating the story – indeed in all conversation with children.

More so, I avoided pronouns in the story. That is in attempt to further simplifies things for easy comprehension. Teachers should try as much as possible to narrate the story in a language most suitable for the learners. Note that you may also narrate the story in local dialect, provided all the pupils understand the vernacular.

Stage Evaluation Question

2.  Name of the School

Following step 1 above, the teacher asks the pupils if they would rather be Okopi or Amedu? Ask if they will like to be smart so as to receive gifts or not smart without reward.

All should say yes, except those that may not have understood. To the later, the teachers make effort to make them understand by repeating the story and re-asking/reforming the question if necessary.

Subsequently, the teacher tells the pupils that if they want to be smart; they have to be able to tell the name of their school also. However, before that; the teacher teaches the pupils that a school is a place where we go to learn. Thereafter, the teacher makes the meaning of school into question which s/he teaches the pupils the answer – and recites the Q & A with them many times:

Teacher (Question): What is a school?

Pupils: School is a place where we go to learn.

Thence, s/he demands if any of the pupils can tell the class the name of the school. Succeeding the ensuing discussion, the teacher displays the crafted name of the school. Then s/he pronounces the name clearly many times and asks the pupils to repeat after him/her each time.

The teacher pronounces the name and asks individual child to pronounce him/her while the teacher listens.

S/he ensures that each child is able to pronounce it well before moving to the next child. The teacher corrects and repeats several times if necessary. Pay attention to children that may have problem pronouncing one or more sound. Note this so as to practice more of such with the child.

Stage Evaluation Questions
  1. What is a school?
  2. What is the name of your school?

3.  Dialogue

a)  General

Once the teacher ascertains that every child is able to pronounce the name of the school correctly, s/he teaches the pupils how to answer question of their school.

S/he teaches that if someone asks “what is the name of your school?”; they should answer: “The name of my school is ———-.”

Following this, the teacher practices with answering the question with the class. S/he asks the class while they answer uniformly.

Teacher: What is the name of you school?

Class (All pupils): The name of my school is —————————–

The teacher repeats this with the class several times.

b)  Teacher vs Pupil

After the general dialogue, the teacher asks the pupils individually while each of pupil answers. The teacher may precede the question with greeting.

c)  Role-Playing

Succeeding the teacher vs pupils’ dialogue; the teacher makes the pupils to take the role of the visitor (interviewer). Such pupil goes out of the class, then re-enters; starting from the teacher to individual pupil, greets and asks what is the name of your school? The teacher and the pupils play along by answering accordingly.

Upon the pupil’s re-entry:

Teacher: Good morning, John.

Pupil (John): Good morning, Ms. Ruth. How are you?

Teacher: I am fine, thank you.

Pupil (John): What is the name of your school?

Teacher: The name of my school is ———————

Pupil (John): Good! You are smart!! Have this gift

Pupils take turns to ask teacher. Afterwards, teacher may pair pupils to repeat same.

4.  More About the School

Succeeding step 3 above, the teacher teaches the pupils just one or two glories of the school. And s/he clearly tells the pupils how the school is the best for them to learn. First, the teacher explains the categories of school viz public, missionary schools, one person owned private school and many people owned private school

a)  The Proprietor of the School

If it is a private (sole proprietorship), the teacher teaches the pupils the name of the proprietor/proprietress. To do this, the teacher displays the picture of the proprietor (tress) and explains that s/he is the owner of the school.

The teacher may as well arrange for the proprietor (ress) to visit the class at this point. Or the class may visit the proprietor (tress) at his/her office.

If, however the school is owned by partnership, the teacher may display and teach the pupils the name of the chairman and/or board members as may be displayed at strategic place(s) in the school.

For a public school, the teacher teaches the pupils that people (workers) in the area come together, contributed money and built the school so that they (the pupils) can learn because learning is good. As such, the school is owned by the community, mission or government. Accordingly, as people come together to do good; the pupils have the collective responsibility to make they do not destroy public properties so others can benefit as well. This is where the teacher teaches the pupils about cooperation and patriotism.

Stage Evaluation Exercise

Prior to proceeding to the next step, the teacher leads the pupils to recite the answer to questions on the owner of the school:

Teacher: Do you attend a public or private school?

Pupils: I attend a public/private school.

Teacher: Who is the owner of your school?

Pupils: The owner of my is Mr/Mrs. _____________, the government; or the Baptist Church mission/Al-Furqan Islamic Foundation.

b)  Head Teacher

After teaching the ownership of the school, the teacher teaches the pupils about the leadership of the school.

S/he shows the picture of the head teacher and teaches them his/her name. The teacher also explains that the head teacher is the person who controls everything and everybody in the school.

At this point, the teacher teaches the pupils respect for authority. S/he explains that everybody in the school must respect the head teacher just as every student must respect the teachers.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Succeeding the explanations above, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the latest content by asking them the following questions:

  1. The person who controls all the teachers and students in a school is called ____________
  2. Display the picture of the head teacher alongside that of the school owner and ask the pupil to identify them
  3. What is the name of the headteacher of ___________ school?
  4. All the teachers and students must respect the ___________
  5. Students must respect teachers, true or false?

Rhyme

Prior to concluding the Lesson Note Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3; the teacher teaches the pupils the school’s solidarity rhyme – rhyme of that praises the school.

If there is none, the teacher may as well formulate one. And sings with the pupils many times.

EVALUATION

In the concluding part of the lesson, the teacher summarizes the entire lesson into a set of question and answer which s/he recites with the pupils several times – generally and individually.

  1. What is a school?
  2. What is the name of your school?
  3. Do you attend a public school or a private school?
  4. Who is the owner of your school?
  5. Display the picture of the proprietor, proprietress, chairperson of school board/governor and headteacher. Then ask pupil to identify the owner of the school.
  6. The person who controls all the teachers and students in a school is called ____________
  7. Display the picture of the proprietor, proprietress, chairperson of school board/governor and headteacher. Then ask pupil to identify the headteacher of the school.
  8. What is the name of the headteacher of ___________ school?
  9. All the teachers and students must respect the ___________
  10. Students must respect teachers, true or false?

Points to note during oral evaluation on Lesson Note – Pre-Nursery First Term Social Studies Week 2 – 3

Teacher should do this exercise individually for the pupils. S/he may ask the pupils the questions at random period – early in the morning when pupils arrive school; during break time; etc. Teachers may not ask the entire 10 questions at a goal but spread it across intervals. The questions should come amidst regular discussions. Teacher may use help of other staff member. Demand will staff members to ask different pupils at different time and give you feedback. Follow every question with an encourage feedback. If possible, always give gifts to pupils who answers correctly.

Conclusion

The teacher concludes the lesson by noting individual pupil’s performance and providing feedback – more practice guide for each pupil.

Last line

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Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7

Introduction Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. As a result, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, click here to check our official schemes of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified.

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.


Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 7

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 12
  • Recognition of numbers 8 – 9  
  • Matching numbers 4 & 5 with objects
  • Writing Pattern – Tracing horizontal line

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 12
    • Identify numbers 8 and 9  
    • Identify horizontal strokes
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number between 1 and 9
    • Pick up to 12 items from a lot
    • Trace horizontal strokes
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 12
  •  

2.             Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 10
  • Identification of numbers 0 through 7

3.             Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 12 with rhymes.
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 12 counters
  4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 12.
  8. Number 8 & 9 Stencil
  9. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  10. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  11. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  12. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

4.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I. Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

A. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:

  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___
  1. Number
  2. Story
  • How many numbers do we have?
  1. 2
  2. Many
  • Every number has different name and how to write it
  1. Yes
  2. No
  • What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?
  1. Zero
  2. One
  • (Show them any one or two of number 0 – 7 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?
  1. 3
  2. 4
  • 3 and 4 which is greater?
  1. 2
  2. 4
  • Who can show us how to write number 7? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand
    • Who can count from 1 to 7? Allow willing pupil(s) to count
    • Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands? Correct answer wins the sweet J
    • How many eyes does a dog has?
    • How many colours does rainbow has?
    • Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 0 – 7? Allow willing pupil to do
    • What is 7 in (local) dialect?
    • Musa (name of a pupil in the class), please go to my desk. Pick six pencils. Bring it to me.
    • Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 7 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).

B. The teacher thence shows the pupils large colourful painted design of number 11 & 12. Then s/he asks the pupils who knows the name. Following the pupils’ attempts, s/he tells them that they shall learn the two numbers and also create their painted designs during the week.

C. Following that, the teacher explains that before they learn the new numbers; they have to revise the numbers they have already learned. Therefore, the teacher revises the previous lessons by explaining the following:

  •  A number is what tells us how many things we have.
  • There are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  • Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 12, names a number and require a
    pupil to come point at it on the chart. S/he follows this with general oral counting of 1 – 12. Thereafter, the teacher revises numbers 1 – 12 as follows.
  • S/he shows the pupils empty hands and asks them how many items has s/he on his/her hands. Pupils should say nothing. Therefore, the teacher explains that nothing is a number. Nothing is called number Zero – teacher reiterates in local dialect that Zero means nothing and makes pupils pronounce zero. Then showing the number design, s/he continues “this is number zero”. (Demonstrating) “Let’s write number zero on air/sand”.
  • Proceeding, the teacher picks one item and shows it to the pupils. Then s/he asks them how many items has s/he in his/her hands. The pupils should say One. Therefore, the teacher explains that one is a number. One means ____ (in dialect) – everybody pronounces one. (Show model and say) This is number one. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number one on air/sand.
  • The teacher repeats step 6 for numbers 2 up to 9.  

II. Concept of Bundles

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten.

Following this, the teacher distributes the pupils’ improvised pack to them. After that, s/he demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’

understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the

following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
    1. The number after 5 is __________
    2. Seven is a number. What is seven in ______ (name local) language?
    3. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
    4. Now I give 7 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?

NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect. S/he should allow volunteer pupil to count the pencils in Aliyu’s hands. Note that Aliyu here means a pupil in the class – ensure to use the child’s name.

III. Concept of the value of number Eleven & twelve (12)

Number 11

Following the explanation of the number 10, the teacher then teaches that if one already has a bundle and then gets one more – s/he gives them one more counter; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into the bundle pack, we simply say the total number of the items is one bundle and one – which means a ten and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write one bundle and one as 11. S/he also teaches that the number after a bundle therefore is 11. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 11 is called eleven. So, the number after ten is eleven. The teacher pronounces and makes the pupils to pronounce eleven after him/her, several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 11 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 11 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.

Numbers 12

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats the explanations and exercises under 11 for number 12. See summary below.

  1. If one already has 11 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 2 – because there will now be two (extra) items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and two as 12 and call it twelve.
  3. That means the number after eleven is twelve. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twelve.
  4. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 12 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.
  5. Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 12 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 12; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 12 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

IV. Counting Exercises

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 12 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)
  3. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 up to 11, 12

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 12.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
    2. How many people are sitting on this row?
    3. (Provided there are no more than 12 desks) How many desks do we have in this class?
    4. How many fans do we have in this class?
    5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 12, you should rather ask how many children does your mother has?

V. Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 8 & 9

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. S/he also reminds the pupils that they had learned how we write numbers 1 to 7 in the previous week. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write the next two numbers after 7.

Prior to doing this however, the teacher revises the symbols of numbers 1 – 7 as s/he taught them in the previous lessons as follows:

  • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number one number rhyme.
  • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 2 number rhyme.
  • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 3 number rhyme.
  • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 4 number rhyme.
  • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5. The teacher shows the pupils number 5 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 5 number rhyme.
  • Six is a number. Six means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 6. The teacher shows the pupils number 6 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 6 number rhyme.
  • Seven is a number. Seven means ________ (in local dialect). And write seven as 7. And we write seven as 7. The teacher shows the pupils number 7 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 7 number rhyme.

Numbers 8 and 9

  1. Succeeding the revision of the formation of number 1 to 7 as outlined above; the teacher teaches the pupils the symbols and formation of numbers 8 and 9 as follows.
  2. S/he explains that eight is a number. Eight means ____________ (in local dialect). The teacher writes or displays the symbol of number eight. Then s/he further explains that we write number eight as 8 – written on the board or shown in the model. Afterwards, the teacher leads the pupils to practice writing number 8 on air and/or sand.
  3. To teach recognition of number 9, the teacher repeats step 2 above for number 9.

Number 8 & 9 Demonstration Videos and Rhymes

For reinforcement, after the teacher has revised the symbols of number 8 & 9 and if the resources are available; the teacher plays the videos and leads the pupils to sing and demonstrate the rhyme for each number.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 7, and lead the counting once again – and then several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

Lucky Dip –

Cut several cards and write different numbers ranging from 0 to 9 on the cards. Then pack the cards into a container such as a carton. They may be duplicates of numbers.

Once the cards are packed into the container, the teacher keeps the container of number cards on the stage and invite the pupils, one at a time, to pick a card after shuffling it. After picking, the pupil looks at the number on the card and call it out. If any child calls out the number on the card correctly, the class claps for the pupil and the teacher gives the pupil equal number of sweets. If any child fails to call the number on the card correctly, the teacher gently declines and offer to appoint another willing pupil to help out. In such case, once a helping child names the number correctly; the teacher shares the supposed compensation between the picker and the helping pupils.

Note here that the highest number that should be in the container of cards is 9. That way, pupils will be aiming to pick the card bearing number 9.

Teacher should also take note that container should be closed with a little allowance for free movement of the pupils’ hands in and out of it. If the container is open, then each pupil should be made to look away or close their eyes while picking their card.

Spin Board

The teacher creates a spin board of clock face with number 1 – 9 and a fixed arrow indicator. Each pupil spins the board to rotate very fast; whichever number that the board stops completely as indicated by the arrow, the pupil gets equivalent number of sweet as reward. If the board stops in-between a number, the number that is just past indicates the pupil’s win.

Number Puzzle/Shazam

The teacher gets stickers of different number parts (pattern). Then the pupils arrange the pattern that forms number 8 or 9 as the case may be. Alternatively, a mix of different numbers are given to the pupils then they shade the boxes containing number 8 and 9 with given colour.

VI. Matching Numbers 4 & 5 with variety of objects

In the last next of the lesson – which the teacher may teach concurrently with the rest; the teacher aims to achieve the affective objectives for the topic. This is internalization of the concepts of numbers 4 & 5. By this I mean the pupils should not only be able to reel and sing the rhymes of numbers, but also demonstrate understanding of the concept in normal everyday living.

Hence, after teaching the concepts of numbers 1 – 12 as I have discussed; the teacher ‘challenges’ the pupils with exercises on practical living. S/he does this, first with concrete things, then picture reading and matching of numbers to objects exercise on paper.

With Concrete Objects

While the topic lasts – say each day of the week or at two or three intervals per day, the teacher brings a variety of objects to the class. The items should be of varying numbers between 1 – 5. Then the teacher asks the pupils individually – first as planned group activity during the lesson then individually at different times and randomly – to name the object (out of the variety) that is one through five in number.

Subsequently, the teacher may personalize the questions with each pupil. S/he does this by asking each pupil the number of any of the pupil’s possession that is one through five in number. For example:

  1. How many bag(s) do you have?
  2. Raise three fingers – assuming the pupil knows the meaning of fingers
  3. How many legs do you have?
  4. (In class) Who has two green LEGOS? Etc.

Assignment to parents

As part of the feedbacks to parents for the week, the teacher may also tell them the exercise. The parents can help in the challenge by asking pupils during activities at home. The parents are to ask pupils to identify or name the number of objects that the parents already know to be one through four in number. Nonetheless, enjoy the feedbacks of parents who will proudly tell you their child could say things that are moreJ!

Matching of Numbers 4 & 5 with variety of objects during picture reading

Complimentary to the activities above, the teacher repeats the same challenge during picture reading. For this reason, the teacher collects beautiful pictures of objects – things that appeals to children such as animals (to some), cars (to some), soldiers, cartoon characters, etc – teachers may find out pupils’ interest by asking them or their parents.

Provided computer/screen is available, the teacher makes these pictures into slides. The pictures should be in such a way that some objects are of varying numbers, but most one through five. If screen is not available, the teacher may print out the picture-reading book. Or where even printer is not available such as in the rural areas, the teacher may get preferred Picture Reading textbook or take the pupils for a walk around the school.

Then flipping through the pictures, the teacher identifies the objects with the pupils. But wherever the number of the object they are currently looking at is one through five, the teacher asks the pupils how many of the objects are there?

Take for instance, “Look at this beautiful animal, do you know the name of this animal? Good! Elephant. How many elephants can you see in the picture? Correct! One! Everybody, look at one beautiful elephant”

Matching of numbers 4 & 5 to objects exercise on paper

In the last part of the matching of numbers 4 & 5 to objects, the teacher gives the pupils matching exercises on their Mathematics textbook, workbook or exercise books. However, this is after the teacher has taught the pupils how to form the writing pattern for the week (horizontal strokes). Therefore, the teacher should carry out the previous matching exercises while s/he teaches the writing pattern.

Should there be no Mathematics textbook or workbook with matching exercise available, the teacher can form worksheets or write out the exercises on the pupils’ exercise books.

To do this, the teacher collects or draws a list of objects of varying number – some, one; some two; others 3’s and others in four’s and five’s – on a column. Then either at the right or left side of objects, the teacher writes out numbers 1 to 5 in another column. The number column should be such that the number of 1’s and 2’s equals the number of objects that are one and two respectively.

Note that this exercise reinforces the exercises on writing pattern, hence the objects and numbers have to be in column – at least the first exercise, others may be slanting line.

See sample below.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7 Exercise 1 image
Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7 Exercise 1
Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7 Exercise 2
Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7 Exercise 3
Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7 Exercise 4

NOTE: The objects and numbers are in rows to ensure up and down movement of the writing pattern for the week. For each of the exercises, the teacher explains and demonstrate how to solve it to the pupils. The teacher follows this with quick class activities – which the pupils perform under the watch and direction of the teacher. Then s/he duplicates the exercises as many times as possible for individual pupil’s practice – may be home work.

Writing Pattern: Forming Horizontal Strokes

In the last part of this lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to form horizontal writing strokes. For guidelines on this, please see my Pre-Writing Lesson Notes.

4.             EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 12.

Count 1 – 12

Go to the playground. Pick 12 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,12

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 8 & 9    

  • The teacher uses the lucky dip box, sends the pupils to go and bring a card bearing number 8 or 9 from the box.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers 8 and/or 9 and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.
    • Point at/touch number 8 & 9
    • Draw line to match numbers to object
    • Shade box containing numbers 8 with red colour and 9 with green colour.
    • Shade box containing eight and nine items

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 8 and 9
  3. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  4. Fill in missing number
  5. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

Exercise 4: Matching Numbers to Objects

More exercises as I discussed during the lesson.

5.             CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, I prepared a list of government-approved schemes from Nursery 1 up to SSS 3. Click here to view and download the schemes or  chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.


Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 7

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 40
    • Identify numbers 1 – 40
  • Psychomotor:
    • Trace numbers 9 & 10
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 40

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Copying numbers 7 & 8
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 40

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  1. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 40 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 4 (i.e. 40) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 40
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil

REFERENCES

  1. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre (ERC).
  2. Kano Education Resource Department (KERD) (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  3. Lagos State Ministry of Education (OEQA) (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  4. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).
  5. PRESENTATION

    The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

    Introduction

    To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

    • Writes the topic on the board
    • Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson

      1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

      1. Number
      2. Story

      1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

      1. 5
      2. Many

      1. Every number has different name and how to write it

      1. Yes
      2. No

      1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

      1. Zero
      2. One

      1. How do we write zero?

      1. 0
      2. 2

      1. One bundle of number is called ___________

      1. Ten
      2. Seven

      1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

      1. 10
      2. 13

      1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

      1. Twenty
      2. Ten

      1. 25 is called ____________

      1. Fifteen
      2. Twenty-five

      1. 18 is called __________

      1. Eighteen
      2. Seventeen

      1. Two tens and 3 is called __________

      1. Twenty-three
      2. Thirteen

      1. Which is more, 9 or 8?

      1. 9
      2. 8

      1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

      1. Musa
      2. Eze

      1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

      1. Yes
      2. No

      1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
      2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
      3. Count numbers 1 – 25
      4. Write 3
      5. Write 4
      6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 30 counters

      Ø  Teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort

      Ø  Revises the previous lesson

      1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
      2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
      3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
      4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 35; then asks the pupils the name of each.
      5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 35, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
      6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
      7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
      8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
      9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
      10. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn how to write numbers 7 and 8. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Recognizing Numbers 1 – 40

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 30. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 35 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 36 – 40

After explaining numbers 35, the teacher continues to numbers 36 – 35 as follows:

Number 36
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 35 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction – question 20.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils four bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 3 filled packs and one half-filled pack.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 3 bundles and a half (or 5). In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 3 bundles and 5– i.e. 3 tens and five or thirty-five.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 35 items – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 6. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3 bundles (tens) and 6 as 36 – 3 and 6 close to each other. And we call it thirty-six. S/he pronounces thirty-one and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 37
  1. After explaining number 36, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 36!
  2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 36 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 7. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3tens and 7 as 37 – 3 and 7 close to each other. And we call it thirty-seven. S/he pronounces thirty-seven and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
Number 38 & 39

The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 33 to 35.

Number 40
  1. After the teacher has finished explaining number 39. S/he directs the pupils to arrange the 9 counters left in the fourth bundle pack.
  2. Once the pupils have finished arranging, the teacher asks whether the pack is completely filled. The pupils should probably notice that the pack can still take one more counter. Hence, the teacher explains that since the fourth pack is not completely filled, they cannot say 4 bundles just yet. Instead, they count and say the incomplete counters individually – the teacher directs them to unpack the incomplete counters and count it once again. After counting it as nine, the teacher reminds them that they have 3 bundles and 9 – which is the same as 3tens and 9 or thirty-nine.
  3. Thereafter, the gives each of the pupils one more counter. After that, s/he directs them to refill the fourth bundle pack once more. Once the pupils have finished filling the fourth pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is completely filled. The pupils should answer yes.
  4. Hence, the teacher explains that since the four pack is now completely filled and there is nothing left, we say the total number of counters is 4 bundles and nothing. And 4 bundles are the same thing as four tens. S/he concludes that we write 4tens and nothing as 40 – 4 and 0 close to each other – and call it as forty.
  5. Thence, the teacher pronounces forty and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her several times.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 40. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
  2. Two tens are called ____________
  3. How do we write 3tens and 4? ___________
  4. How is 3tens and 4 called? _______________
  5. Emeka has 31 oranges. Inogwu has 28. Who has more? __________
  6. Emeka gave one of his oranges to Inogwu. How many has Emeka left? How many has Inogwu now?
  7. What is 35 in local dialect?
  8. What is twenty-five (teacher says in local dialect) in English Language?
  9. 4 tens and nothing is called __________
  10. Which is greater/less?
  11. Circle the greater
  12. Teacher asks the pupils to look under their shoes and see their shoe sizes. Then then compare with other pupils.
  13. Play Shopping Game:
    1. Items – box of model items in children store (that cost not more than N40), model wallet, and model mint in common denomination not more than 40 – i.e. N5, N10 & N20
    2. One student acts as storekeeper, when others buy from the student. This will enable them to put the concept of number into practice.

Reminder:

Questions 1 – 8 are oral. You may reword the question into a form that will be easiest understood by the pupils – you may translate to local dialect. But insist the pupils give answers in English except where you want otherwise. That being said, sometimes the pupils may know the answer in local dialect but not in English. You should apply leniency.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 35 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 40 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 40

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-40.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.
  • Forty (4 tens and nothing) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 40.

 Succeeding

the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 40, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 40, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Tracing Numbers 9 and 10

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write two more numbers – 9 and 10.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus:

Tracing number 9

  1. The teacher identifies the patterns that form number 9:

    Number 9 has two patterns – a curve and a vertical line.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7 Image 1

NOTE: The teacher shows the pupils each concrete pattern as s/he identifies it. Also, the nine could be two curves but the one above will be far easier for the pupils to form.

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number nine, they first make the curve; then the a vertical.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7 Image 3

NOTE: The teacher arranges the concrete patterns to form the number as s/he explains

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

Tracing Number 10

The teacher identifies the patterns that forms the number:

Number ten is two different numbers written close to each other. One is a single vertical line and zero is a closed curve. Zero could also be two curves:

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7 Image 5

NOTE: most children are able to form zero as continuous curve. However, forming it as two curves produces better zero for beginners. You should start with the continuous curve. If you find any child finding it difficult, then you may introduce the child to the two curves.

 

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

 

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number ten, first of all make the vertical line, give just a little space and then the zero as I show below:

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 7 Image 8

or

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -40. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 40   

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 40; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
    • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
    • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
    • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Copying Exercise

  1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number 9, 1 and zero before 10

CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help

  6. [qsm quiz=3]

 

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6

Introduction Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.


Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 6

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 12
  • Recognition of numbers 1- 7
  • Matching numbers 3 & 4 with objects
  • Writing Pattern – Vertical Strokes

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 12
    • Identify numbers 1 – 7
    • Identify vertical strokes
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number between 1 and 7
    • Pick up to 12 items from a lot
    • Draw vertical strokes
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 12

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 10
  • Identification of numbers 0 through 7

Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 12 with rhymes.
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 12 counters
  4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 5; and that of 1 – 10.
  8. Number 1 & 2 Stencil
  9. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  10. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  11. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  12. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:
    • What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___
  1. Number
  • Story
  • How many numbers do we have?
  1. 2
  • Many
  • Every number has different name and how to write it
  1. Yes
  • No
  • What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?
  1. Zero
  • One
  • (Show them number 3 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?
  1. 3
  • 4
  • 2 and 4 which is greater?
  1. 2
  • 4
  • Who can show us how to write number 4? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand
  • Who can count from 1 to 5? Allow willing pupil to count
  • Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands?
  • How many eyes do dogs have?
  • Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 5? Allow willing pupil to do
  • What is 5 in (local) dialect?
  • Musa (a pupil), please go to my desk. Pick two markers. Bring it to me.
  • Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 9 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).
  1. The teacher thence shows the pupils large colourful painted design of number 11 & 12. Then s/he asks the pupils who knows the name. Following the pupils’ attempts, s/he tells them that they shall learn the two numbers and also create their painted designs during the week.
  2. Following that, the teacher explains that before they learn the new numbers; they have to revise the numbers they have already learned. Therefore, the teacher revises the previous lessons by explaining the following:
    • A number is what tells us how many things we have.
    • There are many numbers because we can have many things.
    • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
    • Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 10, names a number and require a
      pupil to come point at it on the chart. S/he follows this with general oral counting of 1 – 10. Thereafter, the teacher revises numbers 1 – 10 as follows.
    • S/he shows the pupils empty hands and asks them how many items has s/he on his/her hands. Pupils should say nothing. Therefore, the teacher explains that nothing is a number. Nothing is called number Zero – teacher reiterates in local dialect that Zero means nothing and makes pupils pronounce zero. Then showing the number design, s/he continues “this is number zero”. (Demonstrating) “Let’s write number zero on air/sand”.
    • Proceeding, the teacher picks one item and shows it to the pupils. Then s/he asks them how many items has s/he in his/her hands. The pupils should say Therefore, the teacher explains that one is a number. One means ____ (in dialect) – everybody pronounces one. (Show model and say) This is number one. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number one on air/sand.
    • The teacher repeats step 6 for numbers 2 up to 9.

Concept of Bundles

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten.

Following this, the teacher distributes the pupils’ improvised pack to them. After that, s/he demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’

understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the

following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
  2. The number after 5 is __________
  3. Seven is a number. What is seven in ______ (name local) language?
  4. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
  5. Now I give 7 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?

NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect. S/he should allow volunteer pupil to count the pencils in Aliyu’s hands. Note that Aliyu here means a pupil in the class – ensure to use the child’s name.

Concept of the value of number Eleven & twelve (12)

Number 11

Following the explanation of the number 10, the teacher then teaches that if one already has a bundle and then gets one more – s/he gives them one more counter; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into the bundle pack, we simply say the total number of the items is one bundle and one – which means a ten and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write one bundle and one as 11. S/he also teaches that the number after a bundle therefore is 11. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 11 is called eleven. So, the number after ten is eleven. The teacher pronounces and makes the pupils to pronounce eleven after him/her, several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 11 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 11 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.

Numbers 12

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats the explanations and exercises under 11 for number 12. See summary below.

  1. If one already has 11 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 2 – because there will now be two (extra) items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and two as 12 and call it twelve.
  3. That means the number after eleven is twelve. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twelve.
  4. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 12 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.
  5. Succeeding the explanation and rhymes, the teacher leads the pupils to cut out and/or design their number 12 model after the sample s/he showed the pupils earlier.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 12; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 12 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Counting Exercises

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side; s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 12 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)
  • 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 up to 11, 12

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 12.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
    2. How many people are sitting on this row?
    3. (Provided there are no more than 12 desks) How many desks do we have in this class?
    4. How many fans do we have in this class?
    5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 12, you should rather ask how many children does your mother have?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 7

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write from 1 up to 7. Consequently, the teacher revises the symbols of numbers 1 – 7 as s/he taught them in the previous lessons as follows:

  • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number one number rhyme.
  • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 2 number rhyme.
  • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 3 number rhyme.
  • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 4 number rhyme.
  • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5. The teacher shows the pupils number 5 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 5 number rhyme.
  • Six is a number. Six means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 6. The teacher shows the pupils number 6 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 6 number rhyme.
  • Seven is a number. Seven means ________ (in local dialect). And write seven as 7. And we write four as 7. The teacher shows the pupils number 7 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number 7 number rhyme.
  • Number 1 – 7 Demonstration Videos and Rhymes

    For reinforcement, after the teacher has revised the symbols of number 1 – 7 and the resources are available; the teacher plays the videos and leads the pupils to sings and demonstrates the rhyme for each number.

    The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

    Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 7, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

    Evaluation

    The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

    S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then s/he gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

    The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it. S/he provides feedback to the pupils immediately and personally – if a child gets any right, praise the heartily; if a child gets any wrong, praise the child heartily for the right answers and give the wrong ones as next target.

  • Matching Numbers 3 & 4 with variety of objects

    In the last next of the lesson – which the teacher may teach concurrently with the rest; the teacher aims to achieve the affective objectives for the topic. This is internalization of the concepts of numbers 3 & 4. By this I mean the pupils should not only be able to reel and sing the rhymes of numbers, but also demonstrate understanding of the concept in normal everyday living.

    Hence, after teaching the concepts of numbers 1 – 12 as I have discussed; the teacher ‘challenges’ the pupils with exercises on practical living. S/he does this, first with concrete things, then picture reading and matching of numbers to objects exercise on paper.

    With Concrete Objects

    While the topic lasts – say each day of the week or at two or three intervals per day, the teacher brings a variety of objects to the class. The items should be of varying numbers between 1 – 4. Then the teacher asks the pupils individually – first as planned group activity during the lesson then individually at different times and randomly – to name the object (out of the variety) that is one through four in number.

    Subsequently, the teacher may personalize the questions with each pupil. S/he does this by asking each pupil the number of any of the pupil’s possession that is one through four in number. For example:

    1. How many bag(s) do you have?
    2. Raise two fingers – assuming the pupil knows the meaning of fingers
    3. How many legs do you have?
    4. (In class) Who has two green LEGOS?

    Assignment to parents

    As part of the feedbacks to parents for the week, the teacher may also tell them the exercise. The parents can help in the challenge by asking pupils during activities at home. The parents are to ask pupils to identify or name the number of objects that the parents already know to be one through four in number. Nonetheless, enjoy the feedbacks of parents who will proudly tell you their child could say things that are moreJ!

    Matching of Numbers 3 & 4 with variety of objects during picture reading

    Complimentary to the activities above, the teacher repeats the same challenge during picture reading. For this reason, the teacher collects beautiful pictures of objects – things that appeals to children such as animals (to some), cars (to some), soldiers, cartoon characters, etc – teachers may find out pupils’ interest by asking them or their parents.

    Provided computer/screen is available, the teacher makes these pictures into slides. The pictures should be in such a way that some objects are of varying numbers, but most one through four. If screen is not available, the teacher may print out the picture-reading book. Or, where even printer is not available such as in the rural areas; the teacher may get preferred Picture Reading textbook or take the pupils for a walk around.

    Then flipping through the pictures, the teacher identifies the objects with the pupils. But wherever the number of the object they are currently looking at is one through four, the teacher asks the pupils how many of the objects are there?

    Take for instance, “Look at this beautiful animal, do you know the name of this animal? Good, Elephant! How many elephants can you see in the picture? Correct! One! Everybody, look at one beautiful elephant”

    Matching of numbers 3 & 4 to objects exercise on paper

    In the last part of the matching of numbers 3 & 4 to objects, the teacher gives the pupils matching exercises on their Mathematics textbook, workbook or exercise books. However, this is after the teacher has taught the pupils how to form the writing pattern for the week (vertical strokes). Therefore, the teacher should carry out the previous matching exercises while s/he teaches the writing pattern.

    Should there be no Mathematics textbook or workbook with matching exercise available, the teacher can form worksheets or write out the exercises on the pupils’ exercise books.

    To do this, the teacher collects or draws a list of objects of varying number – some, one; some two; others 3’s and others in four’s – on a row. Then either above or below the row of objects, the teacher writes out numbers 1 to 9 in another row. The number row should be such that the number of 1’s and 2’s equals the number of objects that are one and two respectively.

    Note that this exercise reinforces the exercises on writing pattern, hence the objects and numbers have to be on rows – at least the first exercise, and others may be slanting line.

    See sample below.

  • Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6 Image 1

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6 Image 3

NOTE: The objects and numbers are in rows to ensure up and down movement of the writing pattern for the week. For each of the exercises, the teacher explains and demonstrates how to solve it to the pupils. The teacher follows this with quick class activities – which the pupils perform under the watch and direction of the teacher. Then s/he duplicates the exercises as many times as possible for individual pupil’s practice – may be home work.

Writing Pattern: Forming Vertical Strokes

In the last part of this lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to form vertical writing strokes. For guidelines on this, please see my Pre-Writing Lesson Notes.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 12.

Count 1 – 12

Go to the playground. Pick 12 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,12

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 7

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 7; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.

Point at/touch number

  • four
  • Six
  • two
  • five
  • one
  • three
  • Seven
  • zero

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 7 and 6
  3. 8 and 7
  4. 5 and 9
  5. 8 and 9
  6. 10 and 2
  7. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  8. Fill in missing number
  9. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

Exercise 4: Matching Numbers to Objects

More exercises as I discussed during the lesson.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson on Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 6; by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.


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Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

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Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Mathematics Week 5; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 Third Mathematics Week 5; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.


Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 35
    • Identify numbers 1 – 35
  • Psychomotor:
    • Trace numbers 7 & 8
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 35

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Combining patterns to form numbers 5 & 6
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 35

Instructional Materials

  1. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 35 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 3 (i.e. 30) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 35
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre (ERC)
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board
  • Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson
    1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___
  1. Number
  2. Story
  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?
  1. 5
  2. Many
  1. Every number has different name and how to write it
  1. Yes
  2. No
  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?
  1. Zero
  2. One
  1. How do we write zero?
  1. 0
  2. 2
  1. One bundle of number is called ___________
  1. Ten
  2. Seven
  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?
  1. 10
  2. 13
  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________
  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 25 is called ____________
  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 18 is called __________
  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen
  1. Two tens and 3 is called __________
  1. Twenty-three
  2. Thirteen
  1. Which is more, 9 or 8?
  1. 9
  2. 8
  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?
  1. Musa
  2. Eze
  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens
  1. Yes
  2. No
  1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  3. Count numbers 1 – 25
  4. Write 3
  5. Write 4
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 25 counters
 Teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort
 Revises the previous lesson
  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 30; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 30, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn how to write numbers 5 and 6. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Recognizing Numbers 1 – 35

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 30. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 30 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 26 – 30

After explaining numbers 35, the teacher continues to numbers 31 – 35 as follows:

Number 31
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 30 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction – question 20.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils four bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 3 filled packs.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 3 bundles. In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 3 bundles – i.e. 3 tens or thirty.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 30 items – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 1. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3 bundles (tens) and 1 as 31 – 3 and 1 close to each other. And we call it thirty-one. S/he pronounces thirty-one and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 32
  1. After explaining number 31, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 31!
  2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 31 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3tens and 2 as 32 – 3 and 2 close to each other. And we call it thirty-two. S/he pronounces thirty-two and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
Number 33 – 35

The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 33 to 35.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 30. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher directs the pupils to pack the 5 counters into the fourth pack. Then s/he asks them if they had 4 bundles.

NOTE: Since the 4th pack is not completely filled, then we do not say 4 bundles just yet. Instead, we say 3 tens and the number of counters that is left.

  1. Two tens are called ____________
  2. How do we write 3tens and 4? ___________
  3. How is 3tens and 4 called? _______________
  4. Emeka has 31 oranges. Inogwu has 28. Who has more? __________
  5. Emeka gave one of his oranges to Inogwu. How many has Emeka left? How many has Inogwu now?
  6. What is 35 in local dialect?
  7. What is twenty-five (teacher says in local dialect) in English Language?
  8. Which is greater/less?
  9. Circle the greater
  10. Play Shopping Game:
    1. Items – box of model items in children store (that cost not more than N35), model wallet, and model mint in common denomination not more than 35 – i.e. N5, N10 & N20
    2. One student acts as storekeeper, when others buy from the student. This will enable them to put the concept of number into practice.

Reminder: Questions 1 – 8 are oral. You may reword the question into a form that will be easiest understood by the pupils – you may translate to local dialect. But insist the pupils give answers in English except where you want otherwise. That being said, sometimes the pupils may know the answer in local dialect but not in English. You should apply leniency.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 35 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 35 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 35

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-35.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
  • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
  • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 35, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 35, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Tracing of Numbers 7 and 8

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write two more numbers – 7 and 8.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus:

Tracing number 7

The teacher identifies the patterns that form number 7:

Number 7 has two patterns – a horizontal line and a slanting line.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5 image 1

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

NOTE: The teacher shows the pupils each concrete pattern as s/he identifies it.

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number seven, they first make a horizontal; then from the right end, a vertical.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5 image 3

NOTE: The teacher arranges the concrete patterns to form the number as s/he explains

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

Tracing number 8

The teacher identifies the patterns that forms the number:

Number eight has four equal curves:

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5 image 5

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5 image 7

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number six, first of all make three vertical dots – separated by equal gaps. Then make each of the curves as I show below:

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  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

NOTE: Most children are able to form 8 as a continuous curve. Others form 8 as two zeros, one above the other while some do it as a combination of letter S and the mirror version. However, I believe the style I gave above will appeal to majority of the children. Nonetheless, do not be strict on approach. You should be content with whichever approach a child adopts long as s/he is able to form the number well.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -30. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 30

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 30; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
  • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
  • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
  • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Tracing Exercise

  1. How many marks has number 7?
  2. Arrange these (concrete) marks to form number seven
  3. How many marks has number 8?
  4. Arrange these marks to form number eight
  5. Trace the following numbers

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson on Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 5; by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness and assures that the occurrence is natural

Suggest how the parents can help[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]


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Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5; based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5

I wrote this lesson note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5; in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.


Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 5

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 10
  • Recognition of numbers 6 & 7
  • Matching numbers 1 & 2 with objects
  • Writing Pattern – Vertical Strokes

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 10
    • Identify numbers 1 – 7
    • Identify vertical strokes
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number between 1 and 7
    • Pick up to 10 items from a lot
    • Form vertical strokes
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 10

Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 10 with rhymes.
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 10 counters
  4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 5; and that of 1 – 10.
  8. Number 1 & 2 Stencil
  9. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  10. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  11. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  12. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:
    • What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  • Story

 

  • How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 2
  • Many

 

  • Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  • No

 

  • What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  • One

 

  • (Show them number 3 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?

 

  1. 3
  • 4

 

  • 2 and 4 which is greater?

 

  1. 2
  • 4

 

  • Who can show us how to write number 4? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand
  • Who can count from 1 to 5? Allow willing pupil to count
  • Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands?
  • How many eyes does a dog has?
  • Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 5? Allow willing pupil to do
  • What is 5 in (local) dialect?
  • Bayo (a pupil), please go to my desk. Pick two markers. Bring it to me.
  • Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 5 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).

Concept of the value of number six (6) – ten (10)

Subsequent to the revision of numbers 1 to 5 as outlined above, the teacher proceeds to number six as in the following steps.

Number Six

  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 5 counters from the pack – as in the last
    exercise under introduction – question 14.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  • Following this, the teacher explains to the pupils that if one already has 5 items and gets one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 6.
  1. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number six is the next number after number five. S/he shows the pupils number six model and/or writes it on the board and explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number six on air/sand. S/he pronouncessix and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
  2. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 6 video illustration.

NOTE: The teacher may emphasize or reiterate the explanations in local dialect.

Number Seven

  1. After the teacher has taught number six, the s/he explains to the pupils that if one already has 6 items and get one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 7.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number seven is the next number after number six. S/he shows the pupils number seven model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number seven on air/sand. S/he pronouncesseven and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
  • If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 7 video illustration.

Number Eight (8) & Nine (9)

The teacher repeats the explanation for number six and seven for numbers eight and nine.

Concept of Bundles

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten. Thereafter, the teacher distributes the improvised pack to the pupils. After that, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
  2. The number after 5 is __________
  3. Seven is a number. What is seven in ______ (name local) language?
  4. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
  5. Now I give 7 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?

NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect. S/he should allow volunteer pupil to count the pencils in Aliyu’s hands. Note that Aliyu here means a pupil in the class – ensure to use the child’s name.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number one – ten and the pupils have answered the stage evaluation questions; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 10 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Counting Exercises

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counters. Then, sliding each counter to the other side; s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 10 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  • 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 10.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
    2. How many people are sitting on this row?
    3. (Provided there are no more than 10 desks) How many desks do we have in this class?
    4. How many fans do we have in this class?
    5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 10, you should rather ask how many children does your mother have?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 6 & 7

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to write 2 more numbers in addition to the 3 they already know. The teacher first of all revises the symbols of numbers 1 – 5 as s/he taught them earlier.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5.
  • Six is a number. Six means ________ (in local dialect). And we write six as 6. Teacher displays the symbol or model of 6. Afterwards, the teacher plays and leads the pupils to sing number six number rhyme.
  • Seven is a number. Seven means ________ (in local dialect). And write seven as 7. Then the teacher displays the symbol or model of number 7. Afterwards, the teacher plays and lead the pupils to sing number seven number rhyme.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 – 7, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart of 1 – 7, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse (and randomly). Again, the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and leads the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then s/he gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it. S/he provides feedback to the pupils immediately and personally – if a child gets any right, praise the heartily; if a child gets any wrong, praise the child heartily for the right answers and give the wrong ones as next target.

Matching Numbers 1 & 2 with variety of objects

In the last next of the lesson – which the teacher may teach concurrently with the rest; the teacher aims to achieve the affective objectives for the topic. This is internalization of the concepts of numbers 1 & 2. By this I mean the pupils should not only be able to reel and sing the rhymes of numbers, but also demonstrate understanding of the concept in normal everyday living.

Hence, after teaching the concepts of numbers 1 – 10 as I have discussed; the teacher ‘challenges’ the pupils with exercises on practical living. S/he does this, first with concrete things, then during picture reading and matching of numbers to objects exercise on paper.

With Concrete Objects

While the topic lasts – say each day of the week or at two or three intervals per day, the teacher brings a variety of objects to the class one of which has to be in a pair and another lone. Then the teacher asks the pupils individually – first as planned group activity during the lesson then individually at different times and randomly – to name the object (out of the variety) that is one or two in number.

Subsequently, the teacher may personalize the questions with each pupil. S/he does this by asking each pupil the number of any of the pupil’s possession that is either one or two in number. For example:

  1. How many bag(s) do you have?
  2. Raise two fingers – assuming the pupil knows the meaning of fingers
  3. How many legs do you have?
  4. (In class) Who has two green LEGOS?

Assignment to parents

As part of the feedbacks to parents for the week, the teacher may also tell them the exercise. The parents can help in the challenge by asking pupils during activities at home. The parents are to ask pupils to identify or name the number of objects that the parents already know to be one or two in number. Nonetheless, enjoy the feedbacks of parents who will gladly tell you their child could say things that are more!

Matching of Numbers 1 & 2 with variety of objects during picture reading

Complimentary to the activities above, the teacher repeats the same challenge during picture reading. For this reason, the teacher collects beautiful pictures of objects – things that appeals to children such as animals (to some), cars (to some), soldiers, etc – teachers may find out pupils’ interest by asking them or their parents.

Provided computer/screen is available, the teacher makes these pictures into slides. The pictures should be in such a way that some objects are of varying numbers, but most one and in pairs. If screen is not available, the teacher may print out the picture-reading book. Or even where printer is not available such as in the rural areas, the teacher may get preferred Picture Reading textbook or take the pupils for a walk around.

Then flipping through the pictures, the teacher identifies the objects with the pupils. But wherever the number of the object they are currently looking at is either one or two, the teacher asks the pupils how many of the objects are there?

Take for instance, “Look at this beautiful animal, do you know the name of this animal? Good, Elephant! How many elephants can you see in the picture? Correct! One! Everybody, look at one beautiful elephant”

Matching of numbers 1 & 2 to objects exercise on paper

In the last part of the matching of numbers 1 & 2 to objects, the teacher gives the pupils matching exercises on their Mathematics textbook, workbook or exercise books. However, this is after the teacher has taught the pupils how to form the writing pattern for the week (vertical strokes). Therefore, the teacher should carryout the previous matching exercises while s/he teaches the writing pattern.

Should there be no Mathematics textbook or workbook with matching exercise available, the teacher can form worksheets or write out the exercises on the pupils’ exercise books.

To do this, the teacher collects or draws a list of objects of varying number – some, one and others in two’s – on a row. Then either above or below the row of objects, the teacher writes out numbers 1 to 9 in another row. The number row should be such that the number of 1’s and 2’s equals the number of objects that are one and two respectively.

Note that this exercise reinforces the exercises on writing pattern, hence the objects and numbers have to be on rows – at least the first exercise, others may be slanting line.

See sample below.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5
LeadinGuides Mathematics Worksheet Image 1

 

LeadinGuides Mathematics Worksheet Image 2

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5
LeadinGuides Mathematics Worksheet Image 2

NOTE: The objects and numbers are in rows to ensure up and down movement of the writing pattern for the week. For each of the exercises, the teacher explains and demonstrates how to solve it to the pupils. The teacher follows this with quick class activities – which the pupils perform under the watch and direction of the teacher. Then s/he duplicates the exercises as many times as possible for individual pupil’s practice – may be home work.

Writing Pattern: Forming Vertical Strokes

In the last part of this lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to form vertical writing strokes. For guidelines on this, please see my Pre-Writing Lesson Notes.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson on Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5; by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 10.

Count 1 – 10

Go to the playground. Pick 10 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,10

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 5

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 5; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book. Point at/touch number:
    • four
    • two
    • five
    • one
    • three
    • zero

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.

 

  1. Which is greater?
  2. 7 and 6
  3. 8 and 7
  4. 5 and 9
  5. 8 and 9
  6. 10 and 2
  7. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  8. Fill in missing number
  9. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

Exercise 4: Matching Numbers to Objects

 

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes lesson on Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 5 by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary; providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance; and/including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.


[qsm quiz=3]

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

Introduction to Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 35
    • Identify numbers 1 – 35
  • Psychomotor:
    • Copy numbers 5 & 6
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 35

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. Tracing numbers 5 & 6
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 35

Instructional Materials

  1. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 35 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 3 and a half (i.e. 35) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 35
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board

Ø  Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson

  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

 

  1. Number
  2. Story

 

  1. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

 

  1. 5
  2. Many

 

  1. Every number has different name and how to write it

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

 

  1. Zero
  2. One

 

  1. How do we write zero?

 

  1. 0
  2. 2

 

  1. One bundle of number is called ___________

 

  1. Ten
  2. Seven

 

  1. How do we write one bundle and nothing?

 

  1. 10
  2. 13

 

  1. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

 

  1. Twenty
  2. Ten

 

  1. 25 is called ____________

 

  1. Fifteen
  2. Twenty-five

 

  1. 18 is called __________

 

  1. Eighteen
  2. Seventeen

 

  1. Two tens and 3 is called __________

 

  1. Twenty-three
  2. Thirteen

 

  1. Which is more, 9 or 8?

 

  1. 9
  2. 8

 

  1. If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

 

  1. Musa
  2. Eze

 

  1. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

 

  1. Yes
  2. No

 

  1. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  2. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  3. Count numbers 1 – 25
  4. Write 3
  5. Write 4
  6. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 30 counters
  7. Teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort

    Revises the previous lesson

    1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
    2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
    3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
    4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 30; then asks the pupils the name of each.
    5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 30, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
    6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
    7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
    8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
    9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
    10. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn how to write numbers 5 and 6. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Recognizing Numbers 1 – 35

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 30. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 30 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 26 – 30

After explaining numbers 35, the teacher continues to numbers 31 – 35 as follows:

Number 31
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 30 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction – question 20.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils four bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 3 filled packs.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 3 bundles. In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 3 bundles – i.e. 3 tens or thirty.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 30 items – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 1. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3 bundles (tens) and 1 as 31 – 3 and 1 close to each other. And we call it thirty-one. S/he pronounces thirty-one and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
  6. Number 32
    1. After explaining number 31, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 31!
    2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 31 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 3 bundles (tens) and 2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 3tens and 2 as 32 – 3 and 2 close to each other. And we call it thirty-two. S/he pronounces thirty-two and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
    Number 33 – 35

    The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 33 to 35.

    Stage Evaluation Question

    Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 30. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following oral exercises:

    1. The teacher directs the pupils to pack the 5 counters into the fourth pack. Then s/he asks them if they had 4 bundles.

    NOTE: Since the 4th pack is not completely filled, then we do not say 4 bundles just yet. Instead, we say 3 tens and the number of counters that is left.

    1. Two tens are called ____________
    2. How do we write 3tens and 4? ___________
    3. How is 3tens and 4 called? _______________
    4. Emeka has 31 oranges. Inogwu has 28. Who has more? __________
    5. Emeka gave one of his oranges to Inogwu. How many has Emeka left? How many has Inogwu now?
    6. What is 35 in local dialect?
    7. What is twenty-five (teacher says in local dialect) in English Language?
    8. Which is greater/less?
    9. Circle the greater
    10. Play Shopping Game:
      1. Items – box of model items in children store (that cost not more than N35), model wallet, and model mint in common denomination not more than 35 – i.e. N5, N10 & N20
      2. One student acts as storekeeper, when others buy from the student. This will enable them to put the concept of number into practice.

    Reminder: Questions 1 – 8 are oral. You may reword the question into a form that will be easiest understood by the pupils – you may translate to local dialect. But insist the pupils give answers in English except where you want otherwise. That being said, sometimes the pupils may know the answer in local dialect but not in English. You should apply leniency.

    Revision

    After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 35 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

  7. Counting Exercise

    General counting with stand counters

    After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

    He or she puts up the stand of 35 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

    Group and Individual Counting

    After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

    • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
    • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
    • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
    • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
    • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

    Oral Counting without Counters

    After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

    Evaluation

    The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

    1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
    2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
    3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class

    Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 35

    After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-35.

    Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

    • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
    • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
    • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
    • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
    • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
    • – – –
    • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
    • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
    • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
    • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.
    • Thirty-one (3 and 1) is a number which means _____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 31.
    • Thirty-five (3 and 5) is a number which means ____ (in local dialect) and we write it as 35.

    Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 35, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

    The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

    Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 35, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

    Evaluation

    The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

    S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

    The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

    Copying Numbers 5 and 6

    Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write two more numbers – 5 and 6.

    The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

    REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

    Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus:

Copying number 5

The teacher identifies the patterns that forms number 5:

Number 5 has three patterns – a horizontal line (at the top), a vertical line at the middle and a curve at the bottom

NOTE: The teacher shows the pupils each concrete pattern as s/he identifies it.

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number five, they first make a horizontal; then from the left end, a vertical; and from the bottom of the vertical, a curve.

Image 4 Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

NOTE: The teacher arranges the concrete patterns to form the number as s/he explains

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own.
  4. Then the teacher makes four points at each as the vertexes of the number and asks the pupils to join them with appropriate pattern
  5. Succeeding this exercising, the teacher gives the pupils their 2D copying exercise on number 5.

Copying Number 6

The teacher identifies the patterns that form the number:

Number six has two curves, a big curve and a small curve.

Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number six, first of all draw the big curve, then from the inside of the big curve, draw another small curve to join the big curve.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own
  4. Next, the teacher makes three points as the vertexes of the number and then asks the pupils to join with appropriate patterns
  5. Finally, the teacher gives the pupils copying exercise on their 2D exercise.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -30. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 30

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 30; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
    • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
    • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
    • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Copying Exercise

  1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number 5 and 6
  2. Then s/he gives the pupils several copy down exercises.

Note that the teacher can give the pupils tracing and copy down exercises for one number at a time, the day s/he finishes teaching the pupils how to form the number – as I described above.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assure that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help
  6. [qsm quiz=3]

 

Lesson Note – Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 4

I wrote this Lesson Note – Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 4 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3 into Lesson Plan

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 4

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 4

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 10
  • Recognition of numbers 1 – 5
  • Making patterns – crescent shapes making – concave and convex

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

    • Cognitive:
      • Count numbers 1 – 10
      • Identify numbers 1 – 5
      • identify the three straight line patterns in writing.
      • differentiate between the lines
    • Psychomotor:
      • Point at named number between 1 and 5
      • Pick up to 10 items from a lot
      • Shade numbers in an anti-clockwise direction
      • arrange sticks into vertical, horizontal and standing position to form net or a mesh.
    • Affective
      • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 10
      • Show organization skills in taking care of their properties – pets and the likes

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

    • Meaning of numbers
    • How to count numbers 1 – 5
    • Identification of numbers 0 through 4

Instructional Materials

    1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 10 – Rhyme Bus channel on YouTube
    2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
    3. Stand counters of 10 counters
    4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
    5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
    6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
    7. Number charts of 1 – 5; and that of 1 – 10.
    8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
    9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
    10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
    11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:
  2. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

(a) Number

(b) Story

  1. How many numbers do we have?

(a) 2

(b) Many

  • Every number has different name and how to write it

(a) Yes

(b) No

  1. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

(a) Zero

(b) One

  1. (Show them number 3 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?

(a) 3

(b) 4

  1. 2 and 4 which is greater?

(a) 2

(b) 4

  • Who can show us how to write number 4? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand
  • Who can count from 1 to 5? Allow willing pupil to count
  1. Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands?
  2. How many eyes does a dog has?
  3. Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 5? Allow willing pupil to do
  • What is 5 in (local) dialect?
  • Bayo (a pupil), please go to my desk. Pick two markers. Bring it to me.
  • Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 5 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).
  1. The teacher thence shows the pupils large painted number design and leads them to identify the number. Afterwards, s/he tells them that they shall also create their painted number designs. The teacher continues that before then however; they will learn some new numbers.
  2. Following that, s/he explains that before they learn the new numbers; they have to revise the numbers they have already learned. Therefore, the teacher revises the previous lessons by explaining the following:
    1. A number is what tells us how many things we have.
    2. There are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  1. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 5, names a number and require a
    pupil to come point at it on the chart.
  2. Zero is a number. Zero means nothing (repeat in dialect). This is number zero. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number zero on air/sand.
  3. One is a number. One means ____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number one. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number one on air/sand.
  • Two is a number. Two means _____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number two. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number two on air/sand. Let’s sing: There are two black birds – one, two, go! (Teacher leads)
  • Three is a number. Three means _____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number three. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number zero on air/sand.
  1. Four is a number. Four means _________ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number four.
  2. Five is a number. Five means _________ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number five.
  3. Concept of the value of number six (6) – ten (10)

    Subsequent to the revision of numbers 1 to 5 as outlined above, the teacher proceeds to number six as in the following steps.

    Number Six

    1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 5 counters from the pack – as in the last
      exercise under introduction – question 14.
    2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
    • Following this, the teacher explains to the pupils that if one already has 5 items and gets one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 6.
    1. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number six is the next number after number five. S/he shows the pupils number six model and/or writes it on the board and explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number six on air/sand. S/he pronouncessix and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
    2. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 6 video illustration.

    NOTE: The teacher may emphasize or reiterate the explanations in local dialect.

    Number Seven

    1. After the teacher has taught number six, the s/he explains to the pupils that if one already has 6 items and get one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 7.
    2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number seven is the next number after number six. S/he shows the pupils number seven model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number seven on air/sand. S/he pronouncesseven and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
    • If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 7 video illustration.

    Number Eight (8) & Nine (9)

    The teacher repeats the explanation for number six and seven for numbers eight and nine.

    Concept of Bundles

    After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

    S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

    The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten. Thereafter, the teacher distributes the improvised pack to the pupils. After that, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

    Number 10

    Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

    If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration and sing number rhymes with them.

    Stage Evaluation Questions

    Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’

    understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the

    following oral exercises:

    1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
    2. The number after 5 is __________
    3. Seven is a number. What is seven in ______ (name local) language?
    4. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
    5. Now I give 7 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?

    NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect.

    Revision

    After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number one – ten and the pupils have answered the stage evaluation questions; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 10 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

    I.         Counting Exercises

    General counting with stand counters

    After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

    He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

    Group and Individual Counting

    After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

    • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
    • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
    • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
    • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
    • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

    Oral Counting without Counters

    After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

    Number Rhymes

    Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 5 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

    Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
    1. There are two black birds
    2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    • 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)

    Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

    Evaluation

    The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

    1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 10.
    2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
    3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
      1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
      2. How many people are sitting on this row?
      3. (Provided there are no more than 10 desks) How many desks do we have in this class?
      4. Count the fans, how many fans do we have in this class?
      5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 10, you should rather ask how many children does your mother has?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 4

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write 2 more numbers in addition to the 3 they already know. The teacher first of all revises the symbols of numbers 0 – 4.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 – 5, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart of 1 – 5, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse (and randomly), the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it. S/he provides feedback to the pupils immediately and personally – if a child gets any right, praise the heartily; if a child gets any wrong, praise the child heartily for the right answers and give the wrong ones as next target.

Pattern Making – Crescent Shape Making – Concave and Convex

In the final part of the week’s lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly hold pencils to form concave and convex shapes.

For directions on this, see our Pre-Writing Lesson Notes for Week 4.

NOTE: It is not necessary to reserve this shading activity until the last part of the lesson. The teacher may give the exercises as soon as the first day and it may last throughout the week.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 10.

Count 1 – 10

Go to the playground. Pick 10 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,10

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 5

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 5; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book. Point at/touch number:
    • four
    • two
    • five
    • one
    • three
    • zero

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 7 and 6
  3. 8 and 7
  4. 5 and 9
  5. 8 and 9
  6. 10 and 2
  7. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  8. Fill in missing number
  9. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

Conclusion of Lesson Note – Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 4

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

[qsm quiz=3]

Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3

Introduction to Lesson note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3

I wrote this Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson note, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration.

Click here to Learn how to set Lesson Objectives professionally

How to adapt Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3 into Lesson Plan

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 2

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 30

Tracing numbers 5 & 6

Recognition of numbers 1 – 30

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 30
    • Identify numbers 1 – 30  
  • Psychomotor:
    • Trace numbers 5 & 6
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 30

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. How to combine patterns to form numbers 1 – 4
  4. Counting & identification of numbers 1 – 30

Instructional Materials

  1. Concrete writing patterns or equivalent cardboard cut-outs for vertical, horizontal, convex and concave
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 30 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 3 (i.e. 30) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 30
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

1) Writes the topic on the board

2) Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson

  1. [1] What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called __
  2. (a) Number
  3. (b) Story

[2] We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?

  1. (a) 5
  2. (b) Many

[3] Every number has different name and how to write it

  1. (a) Yes

(b) No

[4] What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

(a) Zero

(b) One

[5] How do we write zero?

(a) 0

(b) 2

[6] One bundle of number is called ___________

(a) Ten

(b) Seven

[7] How do we write one bundle and nothing?

(a) 10

(b) 13

[8] Two bundles or two tens are called ____________

(a) Twenty

(b) Ten

[9] 25 is called ____________

(a) Fifteen

(b) Twenty-five

[10] 18 is called __________

(a) Eighteen

(b) Seventeen

[11] Two tens and 3 is called __________

(a) Twenty-three

(b) Thirteen

[12] Which is more, 9 or 8?

(a) 9

(b) 8

[13] If I give 12 sweets to Musa and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?

(a) Musa

(b) Eze

[14] If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens

(a) Yes

(b) No

[15] What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?

  1. [16] Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  1. [17] Count numbers 1 – 25
  1. [18] Write 3
  1. [19] Write 4

[20] Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 25 counters

3) Teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort

4) Revises the previous lesson

  1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
  2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
  3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
  4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1and 30; then asks the pupils the name of each.
  5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 30, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
  6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
  7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
  8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
  9. Three tens (bundles) is called thirty. Thirty is written as 30.
  10. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn how to write numbers 5 and 6. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

Recognizing Numbers 1 – 30

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 30. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 25 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 26 – 30

After explaining numbers 25, the teacher continues to numbers 26 – 30 as follows:

Number 26
  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 25 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. The teacher gives each of the pupils three bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 2 filled packs and an extra 5 counters left.
  4. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 2 bundles and 5. In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 2 bundles and 5 – i.e. 2 tens and five or twenty-five.
  5. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 25 items – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 2 bundles (tens) and 6. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 2 bundles (tens) and 6 as 26 – 2 and 6 close to each other. And we call it twenty-six. S/he pronounces twenty-six and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 27
  1. After explaining number 26, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 26!
  2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 26 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 2 bundles (tens) and 7. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 2tens and 7 as 27 – 2 and 7 close to each other. And we call it twenty-seven. S/he pronounces twenty-seven and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
Number 28 and 29

The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 28 and 29.

Number 30
  1. After the teacher has finished explaining number 29. S/he directs the pupils to arrange the 9 counters left in the third bundle pack.
  2. Once the pupils have finished arranging, the teacher asks whether the pack is completely filled. The pupils should probably notice that the pack can still take one more counter. Hence, the teacher explains that since the third pack is not completely filled, they cannot say 3 bundles just yet. Instead, they count and say the incomplete counters individually – the teacher directs them to unpack the incomplete counters and count it once again. After counting it as nine, the teacher reminds them that they have 2 bundles and 9 – which is the same as 2tens and 9 or twenty-nine.
  3. Thereafter, the gives each of the pupils one more counter. After that, s/he directs them to fill the third bundle pack once more. Once the pupils have finished filling the third pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is completely filled. The pupils should answer yes.
  4. Hence, the teacher explains that since the third pack is now completely filled, we say the total number of counters is 3 bundles. And 3 bundles are the same thing as three tens. S/he concludes that we write 3tens and nothing as 30 – 3 and 0 close to each other.
  5. Thence, the teacher pronounces thirty and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her several times.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 30. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following exercises:

  1. 30 is called ___________
    1. Twenty
    2. Thirty
  2. Peter has 25 sweets and his mummy gave him one more. So how sweets have Peter now? Note: teacher reads the question in local and explains where necessary.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 30 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 30 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 30

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-30.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
  • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.

 Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 30, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 30, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Tracing of Numbers 5 and 6

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write two more numbers – 5 and 6.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the tracing exercises thus:

Tracing number 5

1) The teacher identifies the patterns that forms number 5:

Number 5 has three patterns – a horizontal line (at the top), a vertical line at the middle and a curve at the bottom

NOTE: The teacher shows the pupils each concrete pattern as s/he identifies it.

  1. Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number five, they first make a horizontal; then from the left end, a vertical; and from the bottom of the vertical, a curve.

NOTE: The teacher arranges the concrete patterns to form the number as s/he explains

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

Tracing number 6

  1. The teacher identifies the patterns that forms the number:

Number six has two curves, a big curve and a small curve.

  1. Reminds the pupils how to make and join the patterns to form the number

 

After the teacher has identified and demonstrated the patterns, s/he explains that to form number six, first of all draw the big curve, then from the inside of the big curve, draw another small curve to join the big curve.

  1. Thereafter, s/he makes the pupils to write the number in the air/on sand
  2. After many attempts, the teacher gives the pupils the tracing exercise on their workbook
  3. The teacher first supervises the pupils to trace the number individually before letting them do more on their own

 EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -30. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 30   

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 30; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
  • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
  • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
  • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Tracing Exercise

  1. How many marks has number 5?
  2. Arrange these (concrete) marks to form number five
  3. How many marks has number 6?
  4. Arrange these marks to form number six
  5. Trace the following numbers

Conclusion of Lesson Note – Nursery 1 Third Term Mathematics Week 3

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.

Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas

Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write

State possible reasons for weakness and assures that the occurrence is natural

Suggest how the parents can help

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Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 2

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 2 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact me if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and the FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified.

 Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – “no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration”.

Click here to get the scheme of work that I used and which we also use for other lesson notes.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, new teachers must know that this note is too long/detailed for a lesson plan. Hence, you cannot submit this lesson note directly to your head teacher or supervisor. If you intend to use this note for your lesson plan – which many do; I advise you to get my Lesson Plan Template. I wrote the template professionally in a way that makes it easy for teachers to create clean lesson plans by simply filling it. Click here to check the template.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read our article on their differences

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 2

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 2

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 5

Recognition of numbers 3 & 4

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 5
    • Identify numbers 3 & 4
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number of 3 & 4
    • Pick up to 5 items from a lot
    • Hold pencil correctly
    • Demonstrate flexibility with pencil
    • Colour or shade a given objects, shape of drawing
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 4

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 5
  • Identification of numbers 0, 1 & 2

Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 4 – Rhyme Bus channel on YouTube
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 5’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 5 counters
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 & 2; and that of 1 – 5.
  7. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  8. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  9. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  10. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. The teacher picks a set of the same objects – biscuit, sweet, or any of the counters to be used – in both hands. The number of such items in either hands should not be more than 5.
  2. The teacher thence shows the pupils the items one hand and asks them how many items are in the hand. S/he repeats same for the second hand. Finally, the teacher asks which is greater.
  3. The teacher receives as many attempts as possible. As a motivation, any pupil that get any of the three questions right may be rewarded with sweet or biscuit as the case may be. Endeavour to adequately and publicly praise those that attempts to answer the questions. If a pupil gets it wrong, s/he declines politely and demands/encourage other pupils to try. When a pupil eventually gets it right, the teacher friendly asks the pupil how s/he was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher reminds the pupils the meaning of numbers. Thereafter, s/he revises the previous lesson thus:

  1. S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things. And also that each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written.
  2. Reminds the pupils that they learned some numbers in the previous lesson and also how to count. The teacher may ask the pupils to mention the numbers and count.
  3. The teacher tells the pupils that they there will learn more numbers this week. Hence, s/he writes/displays/projects the topic on the board/screen and proceeds with the lesson.  

How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the Values of Number 1

First, the teacher revises the concepts of numbers 1 – 5 as they discussed in the previous lesson.

  1. The teacher picks a counter – one counter; shows it to the pupils and asks them how many item has s/he. A pupil should probably get it as one. The teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that one is the first number and that it is written as 1. S/he shows the pupils number 1 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is one.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “one”. S/he does this by pronouncing it several while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 1 video illustration.

How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 2

  1. The teacher picks two counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that two is the second number and that it is written as 2. S/he shows the pupils number 2 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is two.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “two”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 2 video illustration.

How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 3

  1. The teacher picks three counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that three is the third number and that it is written as 3. S/he shows the pupils number 3 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is three.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “three”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 3 video illustration.

How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 4 – 5

To teach the pupils numbers 4 and 5, the teacher repeats the activities for number 1 through 3. S/he changes the number to four/4 and five/5 appropriately.

Concept of the Value of Zero

  1. The teacher picks five counters, shows the counters to the pupils and directs them to pick five counters each. After this, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter do they have. The pupils should be able to tell the number.  The teacher commends the pupil and explicitly tells the pupils that they have 5 counters.
  2. The teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 5 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 5 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 5 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  3. Afterwards, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their counters also.
  4. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the four counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 4 counters.
  5.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 4 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 4 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 4 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  6. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  7. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the three counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 3 counters in their hands.
  8.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 3 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 3 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 3 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  9. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  10. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the two counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 2 counters in their hands.
  11.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 2 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 2 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 2 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  12. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  13. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the one counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 1 counter in their hands.
  14.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 1 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 1 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 1 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  15. After the pupils had practised the number one, the teacher once again shows the one counter to the pupils and reminds them that they have one counter.
  16. Afterwards, the teacher drops the one counter. And directs the pupils to drop theirs.
  17. Then s/he shows empty hands to the pupils and asks they to show their hands. Then s/he asks how many counters do they have. The pupils should say none or nothing.
  18. Succeeding this, the teacher tells the pupils that “none” or “nothing” is also a number. S/he shows the pupils number 0 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is zero. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number is called “zero”.
  19. The teacher reiterates (17) and (18) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in local dialect.
  20. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “zero”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.

If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 0 video illustration.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 0. S/he revises numbers 1 – 5 again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written – practise writing on air or sand) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 5 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):

  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 4.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. Touch your eyes, how many eyes do you have?
    2. Touch your ears, how many ears do you have?
    3. How many mouth do you have?
    4. Point at your legs, many legs do you have?
    5. How many shoes do you have?
    6. How many windows are in this class?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 4

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write 3 numbers – 0, 1 & 2.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Three is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Four is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.

 Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 – 4, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and lead the counter once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 5.

Go and bring ___ pieces of chalk

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 & 2   

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 4; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book. Point at/touch number
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 3
    • 4

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 2 and 1
  3. 2 and 5
  4. 5 and 3
  5. 5 and 1
  6. 4 and 5
  • Count and circle the greater/lesser
  • Fill in missing number
  • Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

[qsm quiz=3]

Lesson Note Nursery 2 First Term Mathematics Week 1

Introduction to this Lesson Note Nursery 2 First Term Mathematics Week 1

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 2 First Term Mathematics Week 1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact me if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and the FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Click here to get the scheme of work that I used and which we also use for other lesson notes.

Guides to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, new teachers must know that this note is too long/detailed for a lesson plan. Hence, you cannot submit this lesson note directly to your head teacher or supervisor. If you intend to use this note for your lesson plan – which many do; I advise you to get my Lesson Plan Template. I wrote the template professionally in a way that makes it easy for teachers to create clean lesson plans by simply filling it. Click here to check the template.

 

Lesson Note Nursery 2 First Term Mathematics Week 1

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 1

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 20

Recognition of numbers 1 – 20

Writing 1 – 10

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 20
    • Identify numbers 1 – 20
  • Psychomotor:
    • Write numbers 1 – 10
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 20

2.             Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Counting numbers 1 – 50
  2. Writing of numbers 1 – 50

3.             Instructional Materials

  1. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  2. Stand counters of 20 beads
  3. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 2 for each pupil
  4. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  5. Number charts of 1 – 20
  6. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  7. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre (ERC).
  8. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  9. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  10. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

4.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I.         Introduction

Identification of Pupils Previous Knowledge

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  1. S/he picks a set of the same objects – say pencils, or sweets in both hands. The number of such items in one hand should be more than the number in another hand. However, neither of the number of items should exceed 20.
  2. The teacher thence shows the pupils the items in both hands and asks them which hand contains more of the object.

NOTE: The teacher can use currency notes as well – say N20 notes in one hand; and N10 naira note or a mix of lower denomination summing less than 20 in another hand.

Pupils’ Roles

  1. The pupils shall guess the hand that has more of the object

The teacher receives as many attempts as possible. If a pupil gets it wrong, s/he declines politely and demands/encourage other pupils to try. When a pupil eventually gets it right, the teacher friendly asks the pupil how s/he was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher tells the pupils that there is a way older people use to tell the greater things from the lesser – this is called number.

Revision

After that, the teacher asks the pupils if any of them is still able to remember the meaning of number. Following attempts, the teacher reminds the pupils that a number is what tells us how many of a thing we have.

The teacher continues by revising the previous lessons as I outline below:

  • S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written.
  • Examples of the numbers that we have are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 0– for each of these numbers, the teacher reminds the pupils the names, how to form the symbols and the values – by way of demonstration. The teacher remembers that zero (0) is a difficult concept for the pupils to understand at their level. Hence, the pupils will only understand it when the teacher demonstrates it. For guide on how to demonstrate and explain the values of numbers 0 – 9, check this note.
Bundles – Numbers above 9

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers into the improvised container of ten. Thereafter, the teacher distributes 9 counters and one of the improvised pack to the pupils. Thereafter, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the first number after 9 is 10. The teacher notes that we write ten or a bundle as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing. Finally, the teacher observes that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other.

Number 11

Following the explanation of the number 10, the teacher then teaches that if one already has a bundle and then gets one more – s/he gives them one more counter; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into the bundle pack, we simply say the total number of the item is one bundle and one – which means a ten and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write one bundle and one as 11. S/he also teaches that the number after a bundle therefore is 11. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 11 is called eleven. So, the number after ten is eleven.

Numbers 12 – 19

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats it for numbers 12 through 19. For each number the teacher gives three explanations:

  1. If one already has 11 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 2 – because there will now be two items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and two as 12 and call it twelve.
  3. That means the number after eleven is twelve. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twelve.
Number 20

After number 19, the teacher distributes the second bundle pack to the pupils. Then s/he tells them that since the items outside the first bundle pack is many enough, they should try filling the second bundle pack. Therefore, the teacher leads the pupils to fill in their second bundle pack. After packing the nine counters into the second bundle pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is filled. Since it isn’t, the teacher distributes the one more counter to each of the pupils and then leads the pupils to fill the second bundle pack.

Soon after the teacher and the pupils fill the second bundle packs, the teacher tells the pupils that they now have exactly two bundles and nothing left on the ground. The teacher then teaches that we write two bundles and nothing as 2 and 0 close to each other. The teacher also explains that the name of two bundles and nothing (20) is twenty – s/he teaches the pupils how to pronounce twenty. S/he concludes the explanation that since a bundle is ten, then two bundles means 2 tens.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number twenty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 20 again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

II.         Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 20

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-20.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 20, and lead the counter once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the letter through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Writing Numbers 1 – 10

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils which of them are able to recall how to write numbers 1 – 10. Thereafter, taking each number at a time; the teacher begins with correct pencil grasp. After that, s/he taking each number 1 – 10; demonstrate the formation of each number and directs the pupils to do the same. Kindly refer to my nursery one lesson notes for how to form each numbers 1 – 10.

Since it is first term, expect some pupils that may not be able to flow at the pace of others – especially those that just transferred to the school. Be patient with them, take them at their own pace, revisit lacking basis and build them up.

After letter formation, give the pupils tracing exercises and the finally copying down. It is advisable to start writing exercises by writing on air and sand for starters.

When practicing to write number 10, introduce correct character spacing with multiple demos/examples.

5.             EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -25.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 20

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 20; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise (in Systematic Numeracy)

 

Which is greater?

  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
  2. fill in missing number

6.             CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Science Week 1

Introduction to this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Science Week 1

I wrote this Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Science Week 1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact me if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and the FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Click here to get the scheme of work that I used and which we also use for other lesson notes.

Guides to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, new teachers must know that this note is too long/detailed for a lesson plan. Hence, you cannot submit this lesson note directly to your head teacher or supervisor. If you intend to use this note for your lesson plan – which many do; I advise you to get my Lesson Plan Template. I wrote the template professionally in a way that makes it easy for teachers to create clean lesson plans by simply filling it. Click here to check the template.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, Click here to quickly read my article on their differences.

To the Science Teacher

To whoever that will use this lesson note nursery 1 first term basic science week 3, I urge you to focus on quality. Quality/ wholesome education does not only impart knowledge but practical skills and acceptable social character. This is worthy of note especially in this topic. Ordinarily, preschool science teachers are content with the pupils being able to mention and identify the parts of the body – I know this for my experience in the section. But this topic stretches beyond that cognitive objective. Science education – just like others and at a time like now – is an effective tool to build new breeds of society heroes, to change the society.

The shape of the Nigeran society today, is the reflection of the shallow and wrong education that the society gave today’s youth in the yesteryears – in their youngest days. Every topic, every encounter with a learner or a group of learners; is an opportunity to correct contemporary societal malformation due to past educational malpractices.

This topic, two key of such contemporary societal issues – sex education and gender equality. How beautiful will it be that we groom the youngest of today with full awareness of these issues and in such fashion that they we equip them with the informational tool to protect themselves and to defend social justice.

If we do this, then we will have some reliable assurance of a better society for them and generation yet unborn.

Consequently, I stated the objectives covering these separately under the affective domain. I enjoin you to target their attainment as much as you would the cognitive. As you do this in your various classes and homes; the eyes of the society might not be on you to cheer you for your great effort. But the invincible Third Party in every bargain setup by natural laws – that party that Emmerson inferred in his Law of Compensation – will surely pay in folds.

Lesson Note Nursery 1 First Term Science Week 1

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 1

Subject: Science

Topic: Parts of the body (Self-Awareness)

Objectives:

At the end of the lesson the pupils should have attained the following objectives:

Cognitive:

  • Mention some parts of the body
  • Identify a given part of the body in picture
  • Name the part of their body that is private
  • Differentiate between a boy and a girl; a man and a woman

Affective

  • Demonstrate secrecy of private parts
  • Internalize rudiments of gender equality

Psychomotor

  • Point at a part of the body that the teacher may name
  • Correctly report injury or pain in a given part of the body

Presentation

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as follows:

Introduction:

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

Video illustration

If the resources are available, play the video of a child who is crying while the mother is bathing him/her. The video should be such that the cry intensifies when the mother touches a particular part of the body – say ankle.

At this point the teacher asks the pupils what they think is wrong with the child. After the ensuing discussion – in his/her narration; the identifies that a particular part of the child’s body hurts.

Then the mother after noticing, asks the child what is wrong with him/her. The video should be that the child is unable to accurately tell the mother what was wrong – because s/he does not know the name of the part of the body which hurts.

The teacher asks the pupils why the child was not able to correctly tell the mother what was wrong. Thence, the teacher reveals that it was because the child does not know the name of the body part that hurts.

The teacher tells the pupils that as a result of the child’s inability to correctly tell the mother what was wrong, the mother will not be able to help the child as fast as possible. And so, the child will not be able to run around, playing with friends; nor go shopping with the mum, school, etc. until the child heals. The teacher asks the pupils if they want to be as the child?

Consequently, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall learn all the parts of the body during week. This is so that they could correctly report pains to their parents, teachers and other trusted adults.

Following this, the teacher mentions and explains the lesson objectives to the understanding of the pupils. After this, s/he writes/projects the topic on the board/screen and proceeds with the lesson.

NOTE

Teacher’s role here would include creating the video – cartoon animation. This can easily be done with any of the animation software for android, mac or pc.

Picture illustration

If resources for video illustration is not available, the teacher can use picture illustration instead. In this case, he/she narrates the story as I have outlined above while displaying the pictures appropriately.

NOTE:

Teacher’s role here would include creating the pictures – drawing cartoon. S/he can do this easily on a cardboard – that’s a lot of drawing actually; using software on smartphone, mac or pc.

Storytelling

Although video and picture illustrations will be most and more effective respectively, where neither is possible; the teacher can orally tell the story. In this case, the teacher should ensure he or she is a very good narrators and demonstrator.

Step 2: Differences between male and female – boy and girl; man and woman

In continuation of the lesson, the teacher teaches the pupils the differences between male and female. To do this, s/he displays large poster of a boy and a girl – with body parts unlabeled. Then the teacher leads the pupils to identify it. S/he does this by asking the pupils what pictures are in the poster. A child or two should be able to tell a boy and a girl. Thus, the teacher explains the key vocabulary thoroughly:

A Child: one young human being.

Children: two or more (3, 4, 5, etc.) young human being.

The teacher explains these thoroughly – if necessary, emphasizing in local dialect. After that, the teacher leads the pupils on picture reading of child and children. S/he flips through several pictures of a child and (varying number of) children; then s/he asks the pupils whether the picture currently in view is a child or children.

NOTE:

Teacher’s roles here include collecting and creating several photo slides of random child and children. For personalization, the teacher may add pictures of the class pupils in the slideshow. If a screen is not available, the teacher may as well collect pictures and make it into a picture book. Alternatively, the teacher may use the pupils picture reading textbook.

Stage Evaluation

The teacher may give the pupils some exercises to access their understanding of child and children.

Boy and Girl

Succeeding the exercise, the teacher teaches the pupils the differences between a boy and girl; and between man and women. To do this, the teacher displays the pictures of a boy and a man; and that of a girl and a woman. Then, s/he explains thoroughly:

A Boy: is a child that grows to become a man.

A Girl: is a child that grows to become a woman.

The teacher may use different pictures to emphasize – and in local dialect if necessary. S/he may also mention other differences between a boy and girl as observable in locality. Such other differences include their dressing, hair styles and piercing. Note however that these other differences differ from community to community. For example, while haircutting is rare among girls in northern/Muslim communities; it isn’t much so in southern/Christian communities.

Stage Evaluation

The teacher, by means of several pictures lead the pupils through the exercise of differentiating between boys and girls. The teacher may give more of this exercise to the pupils including asking them individually if they are a boy or girl.

Gender Equality

Once the teacher ascertains that the pupils fully understands and are able to differentiate between a boy and a girl, the teacher introduces the concept of gender equality. To do this, the teacher presents the common gender discrimination in (some) African homes in form of narration. See my sample narration below:

In my (the teacher’s) village, there is a family. It is the family of Mr. & Mrs. Ola Musa Chibuzor (use common local names). Mr. & Mrs. Ola has 4 children – two boys and two girls. In this family, there is a law. The law is that cooking (helping in the kitchen), sweeping and washing plates are only for girls; while running errands are only for boys.

After the narration, the teacher asks which of the pupils have similar rules in their homes. Subsequently s/he corrects the notion of inequality. To do this, the teacher explains that we (human beings) are equal but unique in our differences. And as such that what we CAN DO, we ought to do and not avoid due to gender differences. For example, the girls in Mr. & Mrs. Ola’s home uses their hands to do chores; and the boys have the same hands. Hence the boys CAN cook (help in the kitchen), sweep and do dishes just like the girls. So, the boys ought not to avoid chores simply because they are boys. To buttress this, the teacher displays pictures of male and female personnel of different occupation. For example, male and female doctors; male and female engineers; male and female footballers; lawyers;  soldiers;  superheroes, etc. With the pictures, the teacher explains that girls can aspire and be anything as well as the boys.

In conclusion, the teacher explicitly informs the pupils that rules such as in the home of Mr. & Mrs. Ola Musa Chibuzor is not a very good law. And also, that both boys and girls can do chores – help in the kitchen, sweep, wash plates, run errands, etc.

Stage Evaluation

Succeeding the last explanation, the teacher evaluates the pupils’ understanding of the concept. S/he does this by asking questions such as follows:
1. Is it good for boys to help in the kitchen?

(a) Yes

(b) No

  1. In a home, who is supposed to do the sweeping?

(a) only boys

(b) only girls

(c) boys and girls

  1. Who run errands for mummy and daddy at home?

(a) boys and girls

(b) boys

(c) girls

  1. Can a girl be a soldier? (explain the meaning of a soldier)

(a) yes

(b) no

  1. Can a boy be a chef (cook)?

(a) yes

(b) no

Step 3: Parts of the body

Following the section above, the teacher teaches the pupils the parts of the body. To do this, s/he first of all reminds the pupils the story of the mother and child at the introductory level. Then s/he reminds the pupils of the meaning and difference between boys/men and girls/women.

Succeeding this, the teacher displays the pictures of a boy & a man versus that of a girl and woman side by side on the board.

The starting from head to toes, the teacher names each part of the body, shows the pupils in the pictures on the board – by pointing at it, demonstrates and finally makes the pupils to touch theirs – except of course for the private parts.

The teacher should divide and spread the entire the entire list into the days. In most schools and based on the national curriculum, Science as well as Mathematics and English are daily subjects in preschools. Hence, I assume that Science occurs at least four times in the week. This implies that the teacher should treat a maximum of only five parts of the body per day.

  1. Head
  2. Eyes
  3. Nose
  4. Mouth
  5. Teeth
  1. Tongue
  2. Neck
  3. Shoulder
  4. Hands
  5. Fingers
  1. Stomach
  2. Back
  3. Leg
  4. Knee
  5. Ankles
  6. Toes
Private parts

Once the teacher has adequately treated the parts of the body I outline above, s/he lays the foundation of sex education by helping the pupils to identify the private parts of the body. While this may be awkward for an adult, it is important to remember that the pupils are innocent kids who will likely not attach extra meaning to the names of these parts. Sex education experts believe that the ignorance of the victims is the major weapon of perpetrators of sexual abuse. Hence, there is concordance that knowing the names of private parts is a good and recommended starting point.

In this lesson, the objective is simply for the pupils to be able to say the name/identify the private parts. The pupils should also know that these parts are “private” – and hence, that they should not allow anybody to see or touch them. The teacher clarifies that mom, dad or caregivers/their teacher can help wash their body, a dentist will look in their mouth at an office visit and a doctor or nurse may look at genitals with a parent present.

With the aid the picture, the teacher shows the pupils to identify the following and then explains accordingly.

  1. Mouth
  2. Breast
  3. Buttocks
  4. Penis
  5. Vagina

For each, the teacher identifies it on the post for the boy and man and correspondingly for the girl and woman.

EVALUATION

Prior to concluding the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson through series of exercises – both as classwork and if necessary, homework.

SUMMARY

To conclude the lesson, the teacher revises the lesson and sing the body part rhymes with the pupils several times. Note that the teacher may begin the rhymes after the first-five body parts.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children. With reference to the discussion on private parts, the teacher should give parents heads-up – of likely questions from their children. Depending on school environment, the teacher may prepare a list of likely questions and answers to guide parents. Alternatively, the teacher may recommend articles and books to the parents.

For this reason, I found the articles below useful:

Schiedel, B., 2018. This is how you talk to kids about their private parts. [Online]
Available at: https://www.todaysparent.com/kids/school-age/this-is-how-you-talk-to-kids-about-their-private-parts/
[Accessed 5 October 2020].

Schmidt, C., 2018. How and why to talk to your kids about their private parts. [Online]
Available at: https://www.arnoldpalmerhospital.com/content-hub/how-and-why-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-their-private-parts
[Accessed 5 October 2020].

[qsm quiz=3]

Lesson Note: Nursery 1 First Term Mathematics Week 3

Intro to Lesson-Note-Nursery-1-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-3

I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-3 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact us if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Click here to get the scheme of work that I used and which we also use for other lesson notes.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified.

 Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – “no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration”.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, new teachers must know that this note is too long/detailed for a lesson plan. Hence, you cannot submit this lesson note directly to your head teacher or supervisor. If you intend to use this note for your lesson plan – which many do; I advise you to get my Lesson Plan Template. I wrote the template professionally in a way that makes it easy for teachers to create clean lesson plans by simply filling it. Click here to check the template.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, Click here to quickly read my article on their differences.

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-3

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 3

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic:

  • Counting 1 – 10
  • Recognition of numbers 1 – 5
  • Scribbling – anti-clockwise (right to left) and round

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 10
    • Identify numbers 1 – 5  
    • Anti-clockwise shading/colouring number
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number between 1 and 5
    • Pick up to 10 items from a lot
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 10

Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 5
  • Identification of numbers 0 through 4

Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 10 – Rhyme Bus channel on YouTube
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 10 counters
  4. A bundle pack and one for each pupil – a pack that can contain exactly 10 counters, not more. 10-beads Abacus will do as well.
  5. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  6. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  7. Number charts of 1 – 5; and that of 1 – 10.
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre (ERC).
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department (KERD).
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. Orally asks questions based on the previous lesson:

What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___

a) Number 

b) Story

How many numbers do we have?

a) 2

b) Many

Every number has different name and how to write it

a) Yes

b) No

What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?

a) Zero

b) One

(Show them number 3 model/card and ask): What is the name of this number?

a) 3

b) 4

2 and 4 which is greater?

a) 2

b) 4

Who can show us how to write number 4? Allow willing pupil to demonstrate on air or sand

  • Who can count from 1 to 5? Allow willing pupil to count
  • Pick some sweets and ask: how many sweets do I have in my hands?
  • How many eyes does a dog has?
  • Display the number chart and ask: who can come over to the board and touch/point at number 5? Allow willing pupil to do
  • What is 5 in (local) dialect?
  • Bayo (a pupil), please go to my desk. Pick two markers. Bring it to me.

Everyone, take your Lego (improvised counter) pack. (A row or pupil at a time) come over here. Pick 5 blocks/balls/counters. Go back to your seat(s).

Other Introductory Activities

  • The teacher thence shows the pupils large painted number design and leads them to identify the number. Afterwards, s/he tells them that they shall also create their painted number designs. The teacher continues that before then however; they will learn some new numbers.
  • Following that, s/he explains that before they learn the new numbers; they have to revise the numbers they have already learned. Therefore, the teacher revises the previous lessons by explaining the following:
    •  A number is what tells us how many things we have.
    • There are many numbers because we can have many things.
    • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
    • Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 5, names a number and require a
      pupil to come point at it on the chart.
    • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing (repeat in dialect). This is number zero. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number zero on air/sand.
    • One is a number. One means ____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number one. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number one on air/sand.
    • Two is a number. Two means _____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number two. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number two on air/sand. Let’s sing: There are two black birds – one, two, go! (Teacher leads)
    • Three is a number. Three means _____ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number three. (Demonstrate) Let’s write number zero on air/sand.
    • Four is a number. Four means _________ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number four.
    • Five is a number. Five means _________ (in dialect). (Show model and say) This is number five.

I.         Concept of the value of number six (6) – ten (10)

Subsequent to the revision of numbers 1 to 5 as outlined above, the teacher proceeds to number six as in the following steps.  

Number Six

  1. The teacher directs each pupil to count 5 counters from the pack – as in the last
    exercise under introduction – question 14.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
  3. Following this, the teacher explains to the pupils that if one already has 5 items and gets one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 6.
  4. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number six is the next number after number five. S/he shows the pupils number six model and/or writes it on the board and explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number six on air/sand. S/he pronounces six and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 6 video illustration.

NOTE: The teacher may emphasize or reiterate the explanations in local dialect.

Number Seven

  1. After the teacher has taught number six, the s/he explains to the pupils that if one already has 6 items and get one more – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 7.
  2. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number seven is the next number after number six. S/he shows the pupils number seven model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 6 – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number seven on air/sand. S/he pronounces seven and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
  3. If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 7 video illustration.

Number Eight (8) & Nine (9)

The teacher repeats the explanation for number six and seven for numbers eight and nine.

Concept of Bundles

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers (or the available counters) into the improvised container of ten. Thereafter, the teacher distributes the improvised pack to the pupils. Thereafter, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters in their possession into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the next number after 9 is 10. The teacher shows the pupils number ten model and/or writes it on the board then explains that we write six as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing.  S/he explains that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other – the teacher may lead the pupils to write the number ten on air/sand. S/he pronounces ten and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.

If resources are available, the teacher may show the pupils number 10 video illustration.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’

understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 10. S/he does this by giving the pupils the

following oral exercises:

  1. The teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have altogether.
    1. The number after 5 is __________
    2. Seven is a number. What is seven in ______ (name local) language?
    3. Ten is a number. Ten means 1 bundle and nothing. Who can come and touch/point at number 10 on the chart?
    4. Now I give 7 pencils to Aliyu – teacher does this practically. If I add one more pencil to Aliyu like this – teacher does this practically, how many pencils has Aliyu now?

NOTE: Teacher may re-ask or explain questions in local dialect.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number one – ten and the pupils have answered the stage evaluation questions; s/he revises the numbers 1 – 10 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

II.         Counting Exercises

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 5 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):
  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  3. 1,2 Buckle My Shoes (up to 9,10)

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 10.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. This is your fingers (reiterates in local dialect), how many fingers do you have?
    2. How many people are sitting on this row?
    3. (Provided there are no more than 10 desks) Count the desks in this class?
    4. How many fans do we have in this class?
    5. How many children are in your family – if you are in a polygamous society such as the northern region where members of a family may exceed 10, you should rather ask how many children does your mother has?

III.         Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 4

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write 2 more numbers in addition to the 3 they already know. The teacher first of all revises the symbols of numbers 0 – 4.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero is a number. Zero means nothing. And we write zero as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number. One means ________ (in local dialect). And we write one as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number. Two means ________ (in local dialect). And we write two as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Three is a number. Three means ________ (in local dialect). And we write three as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Four is a number. Four means ________ (in local dialect). And we write four as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Five is a number. Five means ______ (in local dialect). And we write five as 5.

 Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 – 5, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart of 1 – 5, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse (and randomly), the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it. S/he provides feedback to the pupils immediately and personally – if a child gets any right, praise the heartily; if a child gets any wrong, praise the child heartily for the right answers and give the wrong ones as next target.

IV.         Making patterns – scribbling in anticlockwise direction and round

In the last part of the lesson – which the teacher teaches alongside the other part during the week; the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly hold pencils to form vertical and horizontal writing patterns.

For guide on this, see our Pre-Writing Lesson Notes for Week 3.

EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 10.

Count 1 – 10

Go to the playground. Pick 10 stones. Bring it to me.

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,10

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Sing 1,2 Buckle my shoes

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 5    

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 5; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book. Point at/touch number:
    • four
    • two
    • five
    • one
    • three
    • zero

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 7 and 6
  3. 8 and 7
  4. 5 and 9
  5. 8 and 9
  6. 10 and 2
  7. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  8. Fill in missing number
  9. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

[qsm quiz=3]

Lesson Note: Nursery One First Term Mathematics Week 2

Introduction to this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-2

I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-2 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact us if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Click here to get the scheme of work that I used and which we also use for other lesson notes.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified.

 Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – “no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration”.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, new teachers must know that this note is too long/detailed for a lesson plan. Hence, you cannot submit this lesson note directly to your head teacher or supervisor. If you intend to use this note for your lesson plan – which many do; I advise you to get my Lesson Plan Template. I wrote the template professionally in a way that makes it easy for teachers to create clean lesson plans by simply filling it. Click here to check the template.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, Click here to quickly read my article on their differences.

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 2

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 5

Recognition of numbers 3 & 4

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 5
    • Identify numbers 3 & 4
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number of 3 & 4
    • Pick up to 5 items from a lot
    • Hold pencil correctly
    • Demonstrate flexibility with pencil
    • Colour or shade a given objects, shape of drawing
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 4

2.             Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous lesson learned the following:

  • Meaning of numbers
  • How to count numbers 1 – 5
  • Identification of numbers 0, 1 & 2
  •  

1.             Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0 through 4 – Rhyme Bus channel on YouTube
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 5’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 5 counters
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 & 2; and that of 1 – 5.
  7. Education Resource Centre (ERC). (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  8. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department (KERD).
  9. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  10. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).
  1.  

1.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I.         Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. The teacher picks a set of the same objects – biscuit, sweet, or any of the counters to be used – in both hands. The number of such items in either hands should not be more than 5.
  2. The teacher thence shows the pupils the items one hand and asks them how many items are in the hand. S/he repeats same for the second hand. Finally, the teacher asks which is greater.
  3. The teacher receives as many attempts as possible. As a motivation, any pupil that get any of the three questions right may be rewarded with sweet or biscuit as the case may be. Endeavour to adequately and publicly praise those that attempts to answer the questions. If a pupil gets it wrong, s/he declines politely and demands/encourage other pupils to try. When a pupil eventually gets it right, the teacher friendly asks the pupil how s/he was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher reminds the pupils the meaning of numbers. Thereafter, s/he revises the previous lesson thus:

  1. S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things. And also that each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written.
  2. Reminds the pupils that they learned some numbers in the previous lesson and also how to count. The teacher may ask the pupils to mention the numbers and count.
  3. The teacher tells the pupils that they there will learn more numbers this week. Hence, s/he writes/displays/projects the topic on the board/screen and proceeds with the lesson.  

II.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the Values of Number 1

First, the teacher revises the concepts of numbers 1 – 5 as they discussed in the previous lesson.

  1. The teacher picks a counter – one counter; shows it to the pupils and asks them how many item has s/he. A pupil should probably get it as one. The teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that one is the first number and that it is written as 1. S/he shows the pupils number 1 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is one.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “one”. S/he does this by pronouncing it several while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 1 video illustration.

III.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 2

  1. The teacher picks two counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that two is the second number and that it is written as 2. S/he shows the pupils number 2 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is two.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “two”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 2 video illustration.

IV.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 3

  1. The teacher picks three counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that three is the third number and that it is written as 3. S/he shows the pupils number 3 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is three.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “three”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 3 video illustration.
  1.  

I.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 4 – 5

To teach the pupils numbers 4 and 5, the teacher repeats the activities for number 1 through 3. S/he changes the number to four/4 and five/5 appropriately.

II.         Concept of the Value of Zero

  1. The teacher picks five counters, shows the counters to the pupils and directs them to pick five counters each. After this, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter do they have. The pupils should be able to tell the number.  The teacher commends the pupil and explicitly tells the pupils that they have 5 counters.
  2. The teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 5 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 5 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 5 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  3. Afterwards, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their counters also.
  4. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the four counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 4 counters.
  5.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 4 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 4 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 4 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  6. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  7. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the three counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 3 counters in their hands.
  8.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 3 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 3 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 3 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  9. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  10. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the two counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 2 counters in their hands.
  11.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 2 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 2 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 2 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  12. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  13. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the one counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 1 counters in their hands.
  14.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 1 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 1 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 1 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  15. After the pupils had practised the number one, the teacher once again shows the one counter to the pupils and reminds them that they have one counter.
  16. Afterwards, the teacher drops the one counter. And directs the pupils to drop theirs.
  17. Then s/he shows empty hands to the pupils and asks they to show their hands. Then s/he asks how many counters do they have. The pupils should say none or nothing.
  18. Succeeding this, the teacher tells the pupils that “none” or “nothing” is also a number. S/he shows the pupils number 0 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is zero. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number is called “zero”.
  19. The teacher reiterates (17) and (18) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in local dialect.
  20. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “zero”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.

If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 0 video illustration.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 0. S/he revises numbers 1 – 5 again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written – practise writing on air or sand) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

III.         Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 5 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):

  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

IV.         Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 4.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. Touch your eyes, how many eyes do you have?
    2. Touch your ears, how many ears do you have?
    3. How many mouth do you have?
    4. How many legs do you have?
    5. How many shoes do you have?
    6. How many windows are in this class?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 4

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write 3 numbers – 0, 1 & 2.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Three is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 3. The teacher shows the pupils number 3 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Four is a number which means ________ (in local dialect) and we write it as 4. The teacher shows the pupils number 4 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.

 Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 – 4, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and lead the counter once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

2.             EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 5.

Go and bring ___ pieces of chalk

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 & 2   

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 4; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.
    • Point at/touch number 2
    • Point at/touch number 1
    • Point at/touch number 0
    • Point at/touch number 3
    • Point at/touch number 4

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
  2. 2 and 1
  3. 2 and 5
  4. 5 and 3
  5. 5 and 1
  6. 4 and 5
  • Count and circle the greater/lesser
  • Fill in missing number
  • Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

3.             CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Introduction to this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-First-Term-Mathematics-Week-1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed in 2014 – contact us if you want this scheme. This scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. This is because all the states developed their schemes from the National Curriculum. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified.

 Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – “no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration”.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this note for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – should get our Lesson Plan Template. The layout of the template makes it easy for teachers to write a professional lesson plan and easily.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, click here to quickly read my article on their differences. 

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tools for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Cause of Mathematics Anxiety

After teaching Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 as 1 and 0?

What you should do?

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the underlying concept of every topic. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Class: Nursery One

Term: First

Week: 1

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 5

Recognition of numbers 1 & 2

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 5
    • Identify numbers 1 & 2  
  • Psychomotor:
    • Point at named number of 1 & 2
    • Pick up to 2 items from a lot
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 2

2.             Previous Knowledge

This being the first class, the pupils have no previous organize knowledge of number. However, they have sense of ownership.

3.             Instructional Materials

  1. Screen & Video illustration of number 0, 1 & 2 – Rhyme Bus channel on YouTube
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 5’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 5 counters
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. packed into a (an improvised) container. The counters should be up to 5 for each pupil.
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 & 2; and that of 1 – 5.
  7. Education Resource Centre. (2014). Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  8. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  9. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  10. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

4.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I.         Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher does the following:

  1. The teacher picks a set of the same objects – biscuit, sweet, or any of the counters to be used – in both hands. The number of such items in either hands should not be more than 5.
  2. The teacher thence shows the pupils the items in both hands and asks them which hand contains more of the object.
  3. The pupils shall guess the hand that has more of the object.
  4. The teacher receives as many attempts as possible. If a pupil gets it wrong, s/he declines politely and demands/encourage other pupils to try. When a pupil eventually gets it right, the teacher friendly asks the pupil how s/he was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher tells the pupils that there is a way older people use to tell the greater things from the lesser – this is called number – the teacher pronounces number many times and asks the pupils to repeat after him/her.

Following that, the teacher asks the pupils if any of them knows the meaning of number. Following attempts, the teacher reminds the pupils that a number is what tells us how many of a thing we have. The teacher may explain the meaning of number in local dialect.

The teacher continues as I outline below:

  • S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and special way it is written.
  • Finally, the teacher reveals that they shall in the week’s lesson learn some numbers. Thereafter, s/he distributes the individual number models to the pupils. The teacher tells the pupils the models given to them is theirs and they should neither misplace nor give it to another person.

II.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the Values of Number 1

  1. The teacher picks a counter – one counter; shows it to the pupils and asks them how many item has s/he. A pupil should probably get it as one. The teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that one is the first number and that it is written as 1. S/he shows the pupils number 1 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is one.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “one”. S/he does this by pronouncing it several while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 1 video illustration.

III.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 2

  1. The teacher picks two counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that two is the second number and that it is written as 2. S/he shows the pupils number 2 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is two.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “two”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 2 video illustration.

IV.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 3

  1. The teacher picks three counters and asks the pupils how many counters has s/he. A pupil should be able to tell the number. If so, then the teacher applauds the child.
  2. Then the teacher explains that three is the third number and that it is written as 3. S/he shows the pupils number 3 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is three.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “three”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  5. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 3 video illustration.

V.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the value of Number 4 – 5

To teach the pupils numbers 4 and 5, the teacher repeats the activities for number 1 through 3. S/he changes the number to four/4 and five/5 appropriately.

VI.         Concept of the Value of Zero

  1. The teacher picks five counters, shows the counters to the pupils and directs them to pick five counters each. After this, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter do they have. The pupils should be able to tell the number.  The teacher commends the pupil and explicitly tells the pupils that they have 5 counters.
  2. The teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 5 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 5 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 5 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  3. Afterwards, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their counters also.
  4. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the four counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 4 counters.
  5.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 4 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 4 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 4 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  6. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  7. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the three counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 3 counters in their hands.
  8.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 3 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 3 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 3 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  9. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  10. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the two counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 2 counters in their hands.
  11.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 2 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 2 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 2 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  12. Again, the teacher tells the pupils to watch as s/he drops one of the counters in his/her hands. Then s/he directs the pupils to drop one of their remaining counters also.
  13. Thereafter, s/he shows the pupils the one counters left in his/her hands and demands the pupils to show him/her theirs. Following this, the teacher asks how many counters do they now have. A pupil should be able to tell the number. The teacher applauds the pupil and tells the class that they have 1 counters in their hands.
  14.  Succeeding this, the teacher directs the pupils to pick and show their number 1 model. Hence, s/he shows them number 1 model and/or writes the symbol of the number 1 and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  15. After the pupils had practised the number one, the teacher once again shows the one counter to the pupils and reminds them that they have one counter.
  16. Afterwards, the teacher drops the one counter. And directs the pupils to drop theirs.
  17. Then s/he shows empty hands to the pupils and asks they to show their hands. Then s/he asks how many counters do they have. The pupils should say none or nothing.
  18. Succeeding this, the teacher tells the pupils that “none” or “nothing” is also a number. S/he shows the pupils number 0 model or writes it on the board and tells the pupils that the name of the number is zero. Thereafter, the teacher explains that the number is called “zero”.
  19. The teacher reiterates (8) and (9) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (8) and (9) with the local dialect.
  20. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “zero”. S/he does this by pronouncing it severally while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
  21. If resources are available, the teacher shows the pupils number 0 video illustration.
  22. The teacher may reiterate in local dialect that “zero means nothing and it is written as 0”

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number 0. S/he revises numbers 1 – 5 again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written – practise writing on air or sand) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

VII.         Number Rhymes

Prior to continuing with the lesson, the teacher makes numbers 1 – 5 into rhymes and leads the pupils to recite it. If resources are available, the teacher displays and narrates the video before and as the class sings the rhymes.

Recommended Rhyme (Cross-curricular):

  1. There are two black birds
  2. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Henceforth, the rhyme shall be sung at regular intervals throughout the duration of the lesson/week.

VIII.         Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of two counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another. E.g. count 1 to 4.
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
  3. Asking them to count the number of a given item
    1. Touch your eyes, how many eyes do you have?
    2. Touch your ears, how many ears do you have?
    3. How many mouth do you have?
    4. How many legs do you have?
    5. How many shoes do you have?
    6. How many windows are in this class?

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 & 2

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write 3 numbers – 0, 1 & 2.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0. The teacher shows the pupils number 0 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1. The teacher shows the pupils number 1 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2. The teacher shows the pupils number 2 model then writes it on the board and leads pupils to write on air or sand.

 Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes, displays or projects numbers 1 & 2, serially on the board/screen or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then invites pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 5, and lead the counter once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

5.             EVALUATION 

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting  

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 – 5.

Go and bring ___ pieces of chalk

Clap 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Raise 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 fingers

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 & 2   

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 & 2; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Activity Book.
    • Point at/touch number 2
    • Point at/touch number 1
    • Point at/touch number 0

Exercise 3: Numerical Values   

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the activity book.
  1. Which is greater?
    1. 2 and 4
    2. 3 and 4 
  2. Count and circle the greater/lesser
  3. Fill in missing number
  4. Arrange from smallest to biggest (vice versa)

6.             CONCLUSION 

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance including suggesting/giving them the video clips for their children.

LESSON NOTE: NURSERY ONE THIRD TERM MATHEMATICS WEEK 2

Introduction to this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-2

I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-2 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

NOTE:  I wrote and extensive on the latest 9-Year Basic Education National Curriculum. If you haven’t read that, click here to read it up. Also, if you need any scheme of work based on the latest 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, chat me up on WhatsApp for it.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan. To make it faster, click here to get my lesson plan template for N300 only or click here to chat with me on WhatsApp.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

My Note to Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tool for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Why many adults have Mathematics anxiety

After having taught Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 and 1 and 0?

My Suggestion

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the concept of the values of the numbers. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 2

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 30

Copying numbers 1 – 4

Recognition of numbers 1 – 30

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 30
    • Identify numbers 1 – 30
  • Psychomotor:
    • Write and copy numbers 1 – 4
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 30

2.             Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. How to combine patterns to form numbers 3 and 4
  4. Counting numbers 1 – 25
  5. Form numbers 3 and 4

3.             Instructional Materials

  1. Concrete writing patterns
  2. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  3. Stand counters of 30 beads
  4. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 2 and a half (i.e. 25) for each pupil
  5. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  6. Number charts of 1 – 30
  7. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  8. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  9. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  10. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  11. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

4.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I.         Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher does the following:

  • Writes the topic on the board

Orally asks the pupils questions based on the previous lesson

  1. What we say or write to tell people how many things we have is called ___
    1. Number
    2. Story
  2. We have _____ numbers/How many numbers do we have?
    1. 5
    2. Many
  3. Every number has different name and how to write it
    1. Yes
    2. No
  4. What is nothing (in local dialect) in English?
    1. Zero
    2. One
  5. How do we write zero?
    1. 0
    2. 2
  6. One bundle of number is called ___________
    1. Ten
    2. Seven
  7. How do we write one bundle and nothing?
    1. 10
    2. 13
  8. Two bundles or two tens are called ____________
    1. Twenty
    2. Ten
  9. 25 is called ____________
    1. Fifteen
    2. Twenty-five
  10. 18 is called __________
    1. Eighteen
    2. Seventeen
  11. Two tens and 3 is called __________
    1. Twenty-three
    2. Thirteen
  12. Which is more, 9 or 8?
    1. 9
    2. 8
  13. If I give 12 sweets to Musa, and 17 to Eze, who has more sweets?
    1. Musa
    2. Eze
  14. If one bundle is called ten, then two bundles (twenty) is 2 tens
    1. Yes
    2. No
  15. What is 8 in local dialect (call the language e.g. Hausa)?
  16. Go and bring 3 pieces of chalk
  17. Count numbers 1 – 25
  18. Write 3
  19. Write 4
  20. Everyone (a row or pupil at a time) come and pick 25 counters

After the oral question, the teacher tells the pupils the progress they have made and commends their effort

FInally, s/he revises the previous lessons

      1. A number is what tells us how many things we have
      2. There are many numbers because we can have many things
      3. Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written
      4. Teacher writes different numbers (one at a time) between 1 and 25; then asks the pupils the name of each.
      5. Teacher displays chart of numbers 1 – 25, names a number and require a pupil to come point at it on the chart
      6. One added to 9 makes a bundle. And a bundle is called ten
      7. Ten is written as 10. 11 is called eleven and it means one bundle and one.
      8. Two tens (bundles) is called twenty. Twenty is written as 20.
      9. Teacher concludes introduction by telling the pupils that they shall learn 5 more numbers in the week. After this, s/he explains the objectives for the week and then proceeds as I describe below.

II.         Recognizing Numbers 1 – 30

Following the introduction, the teacher teaches the pupils how to count and identify numbers 1to 30. S/he first revises numbers 1 – 25 as I discussed in the previous week’s lesson.

Numbers 26 – 30

After explaining numbers 25, the teacher continues to numbers 26 – 30 as follows:

Number 26

The teacher directs each pupil to count 25 counters from the pack – as in the last exercise under introduction.

      1. Thereafter, the teacher confirms the number of counters with each pupil.
      2. The teacher gives each of the pupils three bundle packs and directs the pupils to arrange the counters in the packs. When done, they should have 2 filled packs and an extra 5 counters left.
      3. Therefore, the teacher asks the pupils how many counters they have. The pupils may say 2 bundles and 5. In such case, the teacher asks further, what is another name for 2 bundles and 5 – i.e. 2 tens and five or twenty-five.
      4. Following this, the teacher tells the pupils that if one already has 25 items – s/he distributes one counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 2 bundles (tens) and 6. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 2 bundles (tens) and 6 as 26 – 2 and 6 close to each other. And we call it twenty-six. S/he pronounces twenty-six and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her – several times.
Number 27
      1. After explaining number 26, the teacher asks the pupils how many counter have they now – the pupils should say 26!
      2. Thence, the teacher teaches them that if one has 26 items and gets one more – the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils; then we say the person now has 2 bundles (tens) and 7. Thereafter, the teacher explains that we write 2tens and 7 as 27 – 2 and 7 close to each other. And we call it twenty-seven. S/he pronounces twenty-seven and tells the pupils to repeat after him/her – many times.
Number 28 and 29

The teacher repeats the same steps for numbers 28 and 29.

Number 30
      1. After the teacher has finished explaining number 29. S/he directs the pupils to arrange the 9 counters left in the third bundle pack.
      2. Once the pupils have finished arranging, the teacher asks whether the pack is completely filled. The pupils should probably notice that the pack can still take one more counter. Hence, the teacher explains that since the third pack is not completely filled, they cannot say 3 bundles just yet. Instead, they count and say the incomplete counters individually – the teacher directs them to unpack the incomplete counters and count it once again. After counting it as nine, the teacher reminds them that they have 2 bundles and 9 – which is the same as 2tens and 9 or twenty-nine.
      3. Thereafter, the gives each of the pupils one more counter. After that, s/he directs them to fill the third bundle pack once more. Once the pupils have finished filling the third pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is completely filled. The pupils should answer yes.
      4. Hence, the teacher explains that since the third pack is now completely filled, we say the total number of counters is 3 bundles. And 3 bundles are the same thing as three tens. S/he concludes that we write 3tens and nothing as 30 – 3 and 0 close to each other.
      5. Thence, the teacher pronounces thirty and makes the pupils to repeat after him/her several times.

Stage Evaluation Question

Before proceeding to the other part of the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the concept of numbers 1 – 30. S/he does this by giving the pupils the following exercises:

      1. 30 is called ___________
        1. Twenty
        2. Thirty
      2. Peter has 25 sweets and his mummy gave him one more. So how sweets have Peter now? Note: teacher reads the question in local and explains where necessary.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number thirty, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 30 all over again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

III.         Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand of 30 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

      • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
      • Going to each group and while the pupils watch, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
      • Then the teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
      • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
      • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

      1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
      2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her
      3. Asking them to count the number of items in the class

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 30

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-30.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

      • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
      • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
      • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
      • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
      • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
      • – – –
      • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
      • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
      • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25
      • Thirty (3 tens and nothing) is a number which means ______ (in local dialect) and we write it as 30.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 – 30, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 30, and lead the counting once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the numbers through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Writing Numbers 1 to 4

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now continue to learn how to write some of the numbers they learned in the lesson.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the number 1 to 4 writing exercises thus:

How to Write Number One (1)

This is a single vertical stroke (refer to pre-writing pattern). To form it, make two dots such that one is directly above the other:

Lesson Notes Nursery 1 Mathematics Third Term Week 2- How to teach children to write number 1 step 1

Then both dots are joined with a straight line:

Lesson Notes Nursery 1 Mathematics Third Term Week 2- How to teach children to write number 1 step 2

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form it several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand/air  several times. Then from sand/air , the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 1 – exercises. After this, the teacher makes the two dots for the pupils to join with a straight line. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to make the dots and the join it themselves.

How to Write Number Two (2)

This number has a curve, a slant line and a horizontal line:

Lesson Notes Nursery 1 Mathematics Third Term Week 2- How to teach children to write number 2 step 1

To form number 2, start with the curve:

Lesson Notes Nursery 1 Mathematics Third Term Week 2- How to teach children to write number 2 step 2

Join the slant line:

And finally the horizontal line:

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form it several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand/air /air several times. Then from sand/air, the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 2 – exercises. After this, the teacher makes the four dots in number 2 for the pupils to form and join the curve, slanting and horizontal lines in order to form the number. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to make the dots and form/join the lines by themselves.

The teacher picks the model/cut-out of number 3. Then s/he analyses, demonstrates and guides the pupils to form it as I describe below:

Number three is two curves joined.

To form number 3, mark off three vertical dots – one above the other – the middle being at the centre:

Then draw a curve from the top dot to the middle:

And from the middle to the bottom:

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form it several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand/air  several times. Then from sand/air , the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 3 – exercises. After this, the teacher makes the three dots for the pupils to join with curves. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to make the dots and the curves themselves.

To form number 4, draw the first vertical stroke:

Then from the bottom end of the vertical line, draw a horizontal:

And finally draw another vertical across the horizontal:

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form number four several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand/air several times. Then from sand/air, the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 4 – exercises. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to form number 4 on their own – several times.

1.             EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -30. S/he observes those that may have difficulty pronouncing or missing one or two numbers – so as to help them and/or recommend assistance for their parents.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 30

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 30; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse and randomly.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in accompanying worksheet.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise in the worksheet
  • The teacher gives pupils simple ordering of numbers – see worksheet
  • Teacher gives pupils greater/less than exercises
  1. count and circle the greater/lesser
  • Fill in missing number

Exercise 4: Copying Numbers 1 – 4

  1. The teacher gives the pupils reasonable tracing exercise for number 1 – 4
  2. Then s/he gives the pupils several copy down exercises. Note that the teacher can give the pupils tracing and copy down exercises for one number at a time, the day s/he finishes teaching the pupils how to form the number – as I described above.

2.             CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

Feedback format:

  1. Starts from child’s strength – attentiveness in class, willingness to learn, happiness to participate in activities, participation in class discussion, numbers s/he has mastered – counting, recognition, value, writing, etc.
  2. Express optimism in child’s ability to improve in all areas
  3. Weak areas – numbers the child finds difficult to count, recall, recognize, conceptualize or write
  4. State possible reasons for weakness or assures that the occurrence is natural
  5. Suggest how the parents can help

Click here to download this Lesson Note

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-English-Language-Week-1

INTRODUCTION TO THIS LESSON-NOTE-NURSERY-ONE-THIRD-TERM-ENGLISH-LANGUAGE-WEEK-1


I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-English-Language-Week-1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed.
However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource
development center. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

THE COMPLETE LESSON OBJECTIVES

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an
enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provides guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in English as NERDC specified in the Teachers’ Guide for the 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum for English Language.
Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and
psychomotor.


Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-English-language

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 1

Subject: English Language: Speech and Structure

Topic: Match same letter Aa – Zz

Simple Greetings and Commands

1.     OBJECTIVES

At the end of this lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

    •   Cognitive:

      Pupils should be able to:

      • identify same letter from Aa to Zz
      • construct simple greetings and simple commands
      • State the meaning of actions, commands and request
      • say the meaning of greeting
      • Say sit, stand, come, go, clap, start, stop, point at, laugh and smile in local dialect.
    • Psychomotor:

      Pupils should be able to:

      • Draw lines to join capital letters A – Z to the corresponding a – z
      • Demonstrate cultural way of greeting in Hausa, Ibo and Yoruba culture
      • Carry out given simple commands
    • Affective:

      • State the reasons why they should greet
      • Imbibe the culture of greeting
      • Show obedience by following commands

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The pupils had in the previous term learnt the following related topics:

      1. Identification of letters from Aa to Zz
      2. Tracing of letters of the alphabets
      3. Making vertical lines, horizontal lines and curves
      4. Greeting at home
      5. Taking simple instructions

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

      1. Alphabet models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-out
      2. Chalk/Maker (of different colours) and black/white board
      3. At least two alphabet charts of different colors
      4. Charts showing how to greet in different cultures
      5. Charts showing different actions
      6. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja:
        Education Resource Centre
      7. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work.
        Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
      8. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education
        Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.

 

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

                             I.  Introduction

Identification of the pupils’ previous knowledge
Teacher’s Role:
      1. The teacher asks the class to recite the alphabets, then he/she write some letters of the alphabets on board while the pupil identify them by their pronunciation. In conclusion of the revision on letters, the teacher asks whether each letter has two ways that we write each. Finally, s/he writes some capital and some letters for the pupils to identify.
      2. After identifying the pupils’ previous knowledge on letters, the teacher asks the pupils whether or not they greeted their parents as they woke up in the morning – and how they did that.
      3. The teacher should also ask the pupils if their parent asked them to do anything in the morning before coming to school and how their parent issued the instruction.
Pupil’s Role:
      1. The pupils shall recite the alphabets as they have learnt from the previous term.
      2. After the recitation of the alphabet, the pupils should respond if they greeted their parents in the morning and they should tell the teacher how they greeted their parents.
      3. Any pupil who carried out a simple order at home shall tell the rest of the class which member of their family issued the order, and what the order was.
Revision

After identifying the pupils’ previous knowledge, the teacher quickly revises the previous knowledge with the pupils. The teacher explains the following:

      1. We can get lots of interesting stories from storybooks – refer to First term week 2 -3 on Letter Work.
      2. We learn stories from storybooks by reading. Reading means to learn the story that is in a book.
      3. To be able to read stories from books, we must learn words. And to learn words, we must first learn letters.
      4. Letters are what we join to form words in storybooks – books that contain stories.
      5. There are twenty-six letters that we join to form words in storybooks – refer to last lesson in second term.
      6. Each of the twenty-six letters has two ways of writing them – one way is called capital letter and the other is small letter. The teacher gives many examples – could be in the form of interaction.

After this revision, the teacher may now continue with the rest of the lesson.

                          II. How to Teach Young Learner Matching of the same Letters of the Alphabets

Part 1: Explanation
      1. The teacher reiterates that there are twenty-six letters that we join to form words in storybooks in English Language. And also that there are two ways of writing each letter – one is capital letter and another is small letters.
      2. Then picking a letter at a time, the teacher writes or displays the capital letter (model) and then the corresponding small letter. The teacher – showing or pointing at each – reads in the style of “capital letter A” and “small letter a”.
NOTES
      1. I advise the teacher to use the format of small letter A that is commonly used in their textbooks.
      2. Take time to differentiate between small letter L and letter I. I also advise you to make this difference in writing. Refer to our lesson notes on Pre-Writing skills for guidance.
      3. Remember that some children have dyslexia. Dyslexia is a common learning disorder that make people unable to see the difference between some letter shapes. For example, it is common to see children writing b instead of d; and q instead of p. Special needs, requires special care. Do not fault the child and/or shout at him/her. We will make a post to that effect soon. For the meantime, you should ask people for how to handle such case.

 

      1. The teacher repeats step (2) above for letters B and b through Z and z.
      2. Once the teacher has explained capital and small letters Aa – Zz, s/he arranges them on the board. Thereafter, s/he leads the pupils to read “capital letter A, small letter a; capital letter B and small letter b; capital C and small letter c; etc.”
NOTE:
      1. Kindly note that the teacher does not necessarily has to teach the entire capital and small letters Aa to Zz in a day.
      2. Move at the pace of each child. Since English and Mathematics occur every day in most schools’ timetable; you can spread this lesson across the days.
      3. You should do the general reading after the majority (75%) of the pupils are able to identify capital and small letters within the range for the general reading.
Part 2: Activity

After the several readings, and after the pupils are able to read Aa – Zz; the teacher leads the pupils through the following activities:

    1. From the instructional materials for this class, the teacher displays or writes capital letters and their corresponding small letters. Then s/he points at each letter and asks the pupils – a volunteering pupil – to name it. After a pupil names the letter, the teacher asks another pupil to point at the corresponding small letter. The teacher does this serially from A to Z; then in reverse from Z to A; and finally, randomly.
    2. Alternatively, or/and in addition, the teacher may name a letter, asks a pupil to point at the capital letter and another pupil to point at the small letter. The teacher may also do this serially, in reverse and randomly.
    3. Succeeding the oral matching above, the teacher writes the both capital and small letters on the board – vertically i.e. capital letters at the left and capital letters at the right. Or horizontally i.e. capital letters up and small letters down. Then s/he picks the first capital letter and with the pupils, identifies the corresponding small letter. Then the teacher draws a line to join both as I show in the picture below

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-English-Language-Week-1
Matching capital letters to small letters

    1. The teacher does this for a few letters and then invites volunteering pupils to come up to the board and join a given capital letter to the small letter.
                                Tips
      1. The teacher may first write the capital and small letters in sequential order at first. Then later, mix the letters up. I also recommend the teacher uses different colour markers/chalks to draw the matching lines – kids love colours.
      2. The teacher can deliberately mismatch letters and let the pupil make their observation.
NOTE:

Since most private schools split Letter Work and the Simple Commands into subsidiaries of the Nursery English Language, I shall end this lesson on the Letter Work for this week here. We shall publish a separate Lesson note on the Simple Command topic for this week.

Consequently, we shall now continue to the evaluation and conclusion phase of this lesson on letter work.

Evaluation

Before the teacher concludes the lesson, s/he evaluates the pupils on the lesson objectives for the week’s Letter Work Topic. The teacher does this both orally and through shading and matching activities.

Oral: Identifying letters Aa – Zz

The teacher calls each child and asks him/her the following questions:

    1. How is this letter pronounced – also the same as what is the name of this letter – or what letter is this? While asking, the teacher points at the letter:

 8. The teacher does this for a few letters and then invites volunteering pupils to come up to the board and join a given capital letter to the small letter. Tips 1. The teacher may first write the capital and small letters in sequential order at first. Then later, mix the letters up. I also recommend the teacher uses different colour markers/chalks to draw the matching lines – kids love colours. 2. The teacher can deliberately mismatch letters and let the pupil make their observation. NOTE: Since most private schools split Letter Work and the Simple Commands into subsidiaries of the Nursery English Language, I shall end this lesson on the Letter Work for this week here. We shall publish a separate Lesson note on the Simple Command topic for this week. Consequently, we shall now continue to the evaluation and conclusion phase of this lesson on letter work. 5. Evaluation Before the teacher concludes the lesson, s/he evaluates the pupils on the lesson objectives for the week’s Letter Work Topic. The teacher does this both orally and through shading and matching activities. Oral: Identifying letters Aa – Zz The teacher calls each child and asks him/her the following questions: 1. How is this letter pronounced – also the same as what is the name of this letter – or what letter is this? While asking, the teacher points at the letter:
Exercise: Identification of letters

NOTE: The pupils should answer in the format: Capital letter A or small letter a

  1. b is small letter B and d is small letter for D. What is the difference between b and d?

Correct Answer: b faces right and d faces left.

Shading and Matching Exercises

(get our Nursery One Workbook)

Conclusion

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance


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LESSON NOTE: NURSERY ONE THIRD TERM MATHEMATICS WEEK 1

Introduction to this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

I wrote this Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes that the Education Resource Centre, Abuja developed. However, this scheme is the same as those of the other 36 states’ education resource development centre. Nonetheless, I only crosschecked this topic in that of Lagos, Kano and FCT only. Regardless, this lesson note is suitable for use in any Nigerian school that adopts the National Curriculum.

Complete Lesson Objectives

As with the rest of our notes, the primary focus of this lesson note is to present an enriched content for the topic. This lesson notes, also like the rest, provide guide for teachers on how to deliver the content to attain the topic objectives. In this regard, I adopt the modern teaching style in Mathematics as NERDC specified

Unlike most lesson notes you may find around which focuses majorly on cognition, I brought out and set objectives to cover other domains of education – affective and psychomotor. This is to ensure a balanced learning experience for the learners. For as Dr Emmanuel Atanda of the Faculty of Education, University of Ilorin wrote – in his Curriculum Development Study Guide for students in Postgraduate programme in Education – “no student can be said to have learned anything if the three domains of educational objectives are not taken into consideration”.

Leading Guide to Adapting this Lesson Note

I wrote this lesson note in outline of standard lesson plans. However, I advise teachers that want to use this notes for official purpose – i.e. to create their lesson plans which they will submit to their supervisors – to follow this guideline to writing standard lesson plan.

REMARK: If you find the terms lesson plan and lesson notes confusing, quickly read this article on their differences.

To Nursery One Mathematics Teacher

The teacher to deliver this lesson must understand that teaching numeracy at the early age entails much more than rote memorization and singing/demonstrating rhymes. Yes, these are effective tool for teaching the pupils how to remember what you have taught them. But much more, the question of numeracy – much as all of the topics at this level – serves as the foundation for the pupils’ progress in the subject in future academic engagements.

Major Contribution to Mathematics Anxiety

After having taught Mathematics at pre-primary, primary, secondary as well as tertiary level; I can categorically say that the majority of the numerous issues that students have in Mathematics is due to poor foundation.

A common point that most early years’ teachers miss in teaching numeration and notation is the aspect of the concept of numerical values. Any Mathematics Teacher in higher classes starting from Primary 4 upward will attest to the fact that majority of the learners finds Number Bases difficult due to their lack of understanding the concept of values of numbers. Even now, you can take the percentage of the primary level learners upward that truly understands the concept of value of numbers above 10. A simple question to test this is: Why do we write 10 and 1 and 0?

Suggested Alleviation

Despite that many early years’ teachers are coming to understand this and consequently adjusting the focus of their classes, more are yet to. Consequently, you should not only measure the success of your class by how your Nursery One pupils are able to recite and perhaps identify and write numbers 1 – 500. You should also evaluate to see how many of them truly understands the concept of the values of the numbers. It is in this regard that I urge you to also focus on the affective objective of this lesson.


Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Class: Nursery One

Term: Third

Week: 1

Subject: Mathematics/Number Work

Topic: Counting numbers 1 – 25

Copying numbers 3 & 4

Recognition of numbers 1 – 25

1.             OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following:

  • Cognitive:
    • Count numbers 1 – 25
    • Identify numbers 1 – 25
  • Psychomotor:
    • Write numbers 1 – 4
  • Affective
    • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1 – 4

2.             Previous Knowledge

The pupils had in the previous terms learned the following:

  1. Meaning of number
  2. Patterns of writing numbers
  3. How to combine patterns to form numbers 1 and 2
  4. Counting numbers 1 – 25
  5. Tracing numbers 3 and 4

3.             Instructional Materials

  1. Number models – plastic, metallic or cardboard cut-outs – consisting of several 1’s through 9’s including 0’s
  2. Stand counters of 25 beads
  3. Several counters – bottle covers, blocks, pebbles, etc. in bundles of 10. I recommend bottle covers in tens packed into an improvised container that can contain no more than 10 counters – 2 and a half (i.e. 25) for each pupil
  4. Chalk/Marker and black/white board
  5. Number charts of 1 – 25
  6. Several (carton) boxes for each pupil
  7. Education Resource Centre. (2014). FCT Nursery Teaching Scheme. Abuja: Education Resource Centre.
  8. Kano Education Resource Department. (2016). Pre-Primary Schemes of work. Kano: Kano Education Resource Department.
  9. Lagos State Ministry of Education. (2016). Early Childhood Care Education Scheme (Mathematics). Lagos: Lagos State Ministry of Education.
  10. Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC). (2012). Mathematics Teachers’ Guide for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Yaba, Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and Development Council (NERDC).

4.             PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

I.         Introduction

Identification of Pupils Previous Knowledge

Mode: Group/Class

As NERDC provided in the Mathematics Teaching guide, the first step in modern – Mathematics – teaching method is to identify the pupils’ previous knowledge.

To do this, the repeats the exercises that s/he did when introducing the concept of numbers. I copy the description below:

Teacher’s Role:

  1. The teacher picks a set of the same objects – say pencils, or sweets in both hands. The number of such items in one hand should be more than the number in another hand. However, neither of the number of items should exceed 10.
  2. The teacher thence shows the pupils the items in both hands and asks them which hand contains more of the object

Pupils’ Roles

  1. The pupils shall guess the hand that has more of the object

The teacher receives as many attempts as possible. If a pupil gets it wrong, s/he declines politely and demands/encourage other pupils to try. When a pupil eventually gets it right, the teacher friendly asks the pupil how s/he was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher tells the pupils that there is a way older people use to tell the greater things from the lesser – this is called number.

Revision

After that, the teacher asks the pupils if any of them is still able to remember the meaning of number. Following attempts, the teacher reminds the pupils that a number is what tells us how many of a thing we have.

The teacher continues by revising the previous lessons as I outline below:

  • S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written.
  • Examples of the numbers that we have are 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 0– for each of these numbers, the teacher reminds the pupils the names, symbols and the values – by way of demonstration. The teacher remembers that zero (0) is a difficult concept for the pupils to understand at their level. Hence, the pupils will only understand it when the teacher demonstrates it. For this reason, I repeat the demonstration of numerical values from my past lesson notes below:

II.         How to Teach Young Learners the Concept of the Values of Numbers

  1. The teacher picks a counter – one counter; show it to the pupils and asks them how many item has s/he. A pupil should probably get it as one.
  2. The teacher explains that one is the first number and that it is written as 1. And that the name of the number is one.
  3. The teacher reiterates (1) and (2) above in local dialect if (especially) in a rural area. The teacher may as well begin the explanation in (1) and (2) with the local dialect.
  4. After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce “one”. S/he does this by pronouncing it several while the pupils repeat after him/her each time. The teacher ensures that every child participates in this.
Concept of the Value of Zero

The teacher repeats the explanation (1), (2), (3) and (4) above for numbers 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. However, to teach the concept of the value of zero; I recommend the teacher does the following:

  1. The teacher picks nine counters and asks the pupils how many counter has s/he. The pupils should be able to tell the number – the teacher may invite a pupil to count the counters and tell the class. Hence, the teacher shows or writes the symbol of the number nine and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  2. Afterwards, the teacher drops one of the counters, invites a pupil to count the remaining counters and tell the class. Thereafter, the teacher shows or writes the symbol of the number eight and leads the pupils to pronounce it.
  3. The teacher repeats (2) above for the numbers 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2; each time dropping a counter afterwards.
  4. Once the teacher has just a counter left in his/her hand, s/he shows it to the class and asks them the number of counter. Upon the class identifying the number 1, the teacher writes the symbol and leads them to pronounce “one” several times.
  5. After the pupils had practised the number one, the teacher once again shows the one counter to the pupils and reminds them that s/he has one counter. Afterwards, the teacher drops the one counter. Then s/he shows empty hands to the pupils and asks how many counters has s/he. The pupils should say none or nothing. Then the teacher tells the pupils that “none” or “nothing” is also a number. And that the number is called “zero”. The teacher concludes by telling them that zero is written as 0. The teacher may reiterate in local dialect that “zero means nothing and it is written as 0”
Bundles – Numbers above 9

After the teacher has finished teaching and explaining the numbers 0 – 9, s/he tells the pupils that those are the numbers there is.

S/he thereafter tells the pupils that we however usually have more things than these numbers 0 – 9. The teacher continues that once the number of a thing is one more than 9 – i.e. if one already has 9 and then gets one more – then we say the person has a bundle.

The teacher demonstrates this by arranging ten bottle covers into the improvised container of ten. Thereafter, the teacher distributes 9 counters and one of the improvised pack to the pupils. Thereafter, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to gradually arrange the nine counters into the pack. Once, the teacher and the pupils have done this, the teacher asks whether the pack is filled – or if one more of the counter can still be added. Since one more counter can still be added, the teacher distributes one more counter to the pupils. Then taking his/hers, the teacher demonstrates and directs the pupils to fill their pack with the one counter.

Number 10

Once the teacher and every pupil has filled their pack and probably covered it, the teacher tells the pupils that the pack is known as a bundle. Hence, the teacher explains further that a bundle therefore is 10. This also means that the first number after 9 is 10. The teacher notes that we write ten or a bundle as 10 (1 and 0) to mean one bundle and nothing. Finally, the teacher observes that we write the number ten in such a way that the 1 and 0 are not far from each other.

Number 11

Following the explanation of the number 10, the teacher then teaches that if one already has a bundle and then gets one more – s/he gives them one more counter; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into the bundle pack, we simply say the total number of the item is one bundle and one – which means a ten and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write one bundle and one as 11. S/he also teaches that the number after a bundle therefore is 11. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 11 is called eleven. So, the number after ten is eleven.

Numbers 12 – 19

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats it for numbers 12 through 19. For each number the teacher gives three explanations:

  1. If one already has 11 items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is one bundle and 2 – because there will now be two items that is not inside the bundle pack.
  2. We write one bundle and two as 12 and call it twelve.
  3. That means the number after eleven is twelve. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twelve.
Number 20

After number 19, the teacher distributes the second bundle pack to the pupils. Then s/he tells them that since the items outside the first bundle pack is many enough, they should try filling the second bundle pack. Therefore, the teacher leads the pupils to fill in their second bundle pack. After packing the nine counters into the second bundle pack, the teacher asks the pupils if it is filled. Since it isn’t, the teacher distributes the one more counter to each of the pupils and then leads the pupils to fill the second bundle pack.

Soon after the teacher and the pupils fill the second bundle packs, the teacher tells the pupils that they now have exactly two bundles and nothing left on the ground. The teacher then teaches that we write two bundles and nothing as 2 and 0 close to each other. The teacher also explains that the name of two bundles and nothing (20) is twenty – s/he teaches the pupils how to pronounce twenty. S/he concludes the explanation that since a bundle is ten, then two bundles means 2 tens.

Numbers 21

Following the explanation of the number 20, the teacher then teaches that if one already has two bundles and then gets one more – the teacher distributes one counter to the pupils; then since the extra one will not be able to enter into any of the bundle packs, we simply say the total number of the item is two bundles and one – which means two tens and a 1. The teacher thence teaches that we write two bundles and one as 21. S/he also teaches that the number after twenty therefore is 21. The teacher concludes the explanation on the number 11 by telling the pupils that the number 21 is called twenty-one – s/he teaches the pupils how to correctly pronounce twenty-one.

Numbers 22 – 25

Succeeding the above, the teacher repeats it for numbers 22 through 25. For each number the teacher does the following:

  1. Tells the pupils that if one already has the present number of items and then gets one more – or if you add one to eleven – the teacher gives the pupils one more counter each time, then we say it is two bundle and 2 – because there will now be two items that is not inside either of the bundle packs.
  2. We write two bundles and two as 22 and call it twenty-two.
  3. That means the number after twenty-one is twenty-two. The teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce twenty-two.

Revision

After the teacher had finished explaining the concept of the values of number twenty-five, s/he revises the numbers 1 – 25 again. The teacher focuses on helping the pupils to identify the numbers, their names and symbols (how each is written) as well as to understand the concept of the value of each.

III.         Counting Exercise

General counting with stand counters

After the revision, the teacher leads the pupils into general counting:

He or she puts up the stand counter. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he together with the pupils, counts until the counters finish from one side. The teacher repeats this by sliding each counter back to the original position and again – several times. The teacher may invite willing pupils to lead the counting by sliding the counters as the entire class counts.

Group and Individual Counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupil’s memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting.

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while watch and follow, the teacher counts different number of counters for each pupil
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his or her counter and give it to the partner
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher
  • The teacher confirms the number then make the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count

Oral Counting without Counters

After the pupils are able to count very well with the counters, the teacher directs them to put the counters away. Then s/he leads them to count orally without using the counters. The teacher and the pupils do this several times. S/he may invite different willing pupils to lead the oral counting as well.

Evaluation

The teacher may assess the individual pupil’s counting ability by:

  1. Asking them to orally count from a number that s/he states to another
  2. Sending them to go and fetch a given number of item for him/her

Recognition of the symbols of Numbers 1 – 25

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way that we write it. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how to we write each number – 1-25.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 2
  • Ten (one bundle and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 10.
  • Eleven (one bundle and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write 11
  • – – –
  • Twenty (2 tens and nothing) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 20
  • Twenty-one (2 ten and 1) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 21
  • Twenty-five (2 ten and 5) is a number which means – (in local dialect) and we write it as 25

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the numbers 1 -25, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils to points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

Following this, the teacher uses the number chart of 1 – 25, and lead the counter once again – several times. S/he may invite pupils to come, point at the numbers and lead the counting.

Evaluation

The teacher evaluates the pupils’ ability to recognize the letter through physical exercise thus:

S/he places different number of counters into the boxes. Then gives the boxes to the pupils with the number models or cardboard number cut-outs. Thereafter, the teacher directs the pupils to open up each of the boxes, count the number of items in the boxes and then pick the corresponding number model/cut-out and place on/inside the boxes with the counters.

The teacher moves round or collects the boxes, confirms the counters and the number model/cut-out that is in it.

Writing Numbers 3 and 4

Succeeding the counting/recognition exercises, the teacher tells the pupils that shall now continue to learn how to write some of the numbers they learned in the lesson.

The teacher first revises concave (outside) curves as well as vertical and horizontal lines writing patterns. S/he may give the pupils a quick exercise to make the patterns.

REMARK: Take note of the pupils that have difficulty with the patterns. And endeavour to take any child back to the needed prerequisite skills for the writing exercise. DO NOT HOLD THE CHILD’S HANDS – it is outdated. With the right basic skills, most children of 3 to 3.5 years are able to form and write numbers on their own.

Following the writing pattern exercise above, the teacher proceeds with the number 3 and 4 writing exercises thus:

How to Write Number Three

The teacher picks the model/cut-out of number 3. Then s/he analyses, demonstrates and guides the pupils to form it as I describe below:

Number three is two curves joined. To form number 3, mark off three vertical dots – one above the other – the middle being at the centre:

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1 Then draw a curve from the top dot to the middle:

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

And from the middle to the bottom:

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form it several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand several times. Then from sand, the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 3 – exercises. After this, the teacher makes the three dots for the pupils to join with curves. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to make the dots and the curves themselves.

How to Write Number Four (4)

Number four has three lines – two verticals and a horizontal. To form number 4, draw the first vertical stroke:

Then from the bottom end of the vertical line, draw a horizontal:

Lesson-Note-Nursery-One-Third-Term-Mathematics-Week-1

And finally draw another vertical across the horizontal:

 

Exercise

The teacher explains and demonstrates how to form number four several times. After that, the makes the pupils to attempt same on sand several times. Then from sand, the teacher makes the pupils to repeat their previous term’s tracing – of number 4 – exercises. Finally, the teacher tells the pupils to form number 4 on their own – several times.

 

5.             EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -25.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 – 25

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 25; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Systematic Numeracy.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some items (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the items into two groups – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise (in Systematic Numeracy)

6.             CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.


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FIRST TERM LESSON NOTE ON LETTER WORK FOR PRE-NURSERY WEEK 2 – 3

This Post with keywords: First-Term-Lesson-Note-Letter-Work-Pre-Nursery-Week-2-3 in One Paragraph

This lesson note guide with keywords: First-Term-Lesson-Note-Letter-Work-Pre-Nursery-Week-2-3 is primarily to help teachers of the first year of the EYF stages in Nigeria. It will also be useful to parents who are looking for ways to help their first-year preschoolers. School administrators and owners can boost the productivity of their first year EYF teachers by simply suggesting this guide to them.

Which Curriculum do I use?

Perhaps this one of the most common question readers asks me apart from requests and other feedbacks.

The answer

Just like any standard school should, I use more than one scheme of work. However, I have based most of my lesson note guides on two major ones – one by Dr. Olatoye and the other by Dr. Ajogwu. The reason why I pick these two schemes is that while Dr. Olatoye’s scheme is based on the National Early Childhood Education curriculum; Dr Ajogwu’s is one of the most popular schemes that private schools in Nigeria, especially in the entire northern region and the FCT, use. More so, since the unavailability of the National Early Childhood Education Curriculum at the different state offices of NERDC, Dr. Olatoye’s scheme is turning out to be one of the most popular in the country. It is already well-circulated in the West and some reasonable part of the Northern states. If you need any of these schemes, you can send us a message via our email: [email protected] or Call/WhatsApp: +234-806-768-927.

Feedback

All in all, I appreciate the numerous feedbacks I receive from our readers – Thank you all very much. For those that have not sent one before, I encourage you do – your feedbacks are a great boost to me. You should note that we publish base on your requests. The subject and topic that get the most requests get published first. You can send your feedbacks and/or request through our email ([email protected])only. You may as well join 7,543 other VIP subscribers of our newsletter.

The Lesson Note Guide: First-Term-Lesson-Note-Letter-Work-Pre-Nursery-Week-2-3

TERM: 1st

WEEK: 2 – 3

CLASS: Pre-Nursery

SUBJECT: Letter Work

TOPIC: Learning letter Aa – Ff and Recognition of letter Aa – Dd

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to read/recite letters Aa – Ff, identify letters Aa – Dd and mention and internalize the concept of letters in reading.

 PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as below:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher explains the concept of reading to the pupils. To do this, s/he:

Reads and narrates a short story from a book.

Then, asks the pupils if the story was interesting. S/he also asks whether the pupils have heard any other interesting story in the past. If there is, the teacher may allow willing pupils to share their story with the class. Afterwards, the teacher asks where the pupil(s) heard their stories from. Finally, the teacher also asks the pupils where (all other) people – including those who tell stories – get their stories from.

At the end of the discussion/identifying where people get stories from – which include from elders, relatives, friends, movies and from books. The teacher emphasizes on books as source of endless number of stories. S/he explains that there are a lot of interesting stories in books – more stories than their cartoon, both for children and adults. In continuation, the teacher explains that to learn the interesting stories in books however, one must be able to read.

Hence, the teacher asks the pupils what they think “to read” means.

Succeeding this, s/he explains that to read or reading means to learn the story in a book. The teacher asks the pupils how many of them would like to learn some other new interesting stories

After the teacher raises their interest and desire to read, s/he explains that to be able to learn stories from books, they must learn words. And to learn words, they must learn letters.

Finally, the teacher explains that letters are what we join to form words. And words are what we join to form stories.

Subsequently, the teacher explains that they are going to begin from learning letters.

Step 2: Learning Letters Aa – Ff

In succession of step 1, the teacher explains that they shall for the week, learn six letters. Therefore, the teacher writes or displays letter A. And then s/he explains that that is the first letter in English and that the name is /ei/. The teacher makes them to pronounce letter A several times. After that, the teacher explains the concept of capital letter and small letter. S/he explains that just like there is big dog and puppy (you may change analogy), so also all letters have both the big form and the small form. The teacher concludes the explanation that we can also call big letters as capital letters.

With the explanation, the teacher writes or display small letter A. I advise that teachers use Comic sans font style of lowercase A as in a. This is because most professional children books use this style. Also it is quite simpler when you compare it with regular a. With Capital and Small letter Aa on the board, and pointing to one at a time, the teacher reads “capital letter A and small letter a” repeatedly while the pupils repeats after him/her.

After several reading of capital letter A and small letter a, the teacher do the same for letter Bb but with explanation that it is the second letter. S/he subsequently does the same thing for Cc, Dd, Ee and Ff.

NOTE: When at Dd, the teacher should extensively differentiate between small letter B and that of D. Small letter B faces right and that of D faces left – b to my right and d to my right.

Step 3: Continuous Recitation of Aa-Ff and Rhyming

Succeeding the explanation of capital and small letters, the teacher displays the alphabet chart for all of letters Aa-Ff. Thereafter, s/he points to each letter at time, pronounces the letter as either capital ____ or small letter ___, while the pupils repeat after him/her starting from A down to F.

The teacher may invite individual pupil to stand in front of the class, point at each letter and read in the manner the teacher did. In this regard however, the teacher should be careful of shy children. I gave suggestion of how to teach shy children in earlier post. Click here to read the post.

The teacher then brings in his/her creativity by making a rhyme of these letters. S/he leads the pupils to sing and demonstrate the rhyme. The target is to make the pupils able to say it offhand.

Step 4: Recognition of Letters Aa – Dd

After the teacher ascertains that the pupils are now able to read/recite letters Aa – Ff, s/he leads them to recognition activities. First, the teacher points to each letter and require the pupils to name the letter. S/he first of all does this serially, in reverse and then randomly.

Conversely, the teacher names a letter and demands the pupils to point at it.

Step 5: Matching Capital to corresponding small letters

After the teacher is satisfied that the pupils are able to recognize the letters, s/he writes the small and capital letters in alternative two columns. S/he then points at a small letter and demands the pupils to point at the corresponding capital letter and vice versa.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding by giving them the exercises in the accompanying PDF file.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by marking the pupils’ activity and recording their marks. And if necessary, the teacher provides feedback to the parents for need home assistance. In this respect, the teacher notes any child that has difficulty with one or two letters. Then s/he gives the child appropriate activity to re-do at home and gives guidelines to parents in assisting the child in the repeat activity.

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Lesson Note: Third Term Week 2 Social Studies Nursery 2

Introduction to this post with keywords Lesson-Note-Third-Term-Week-2-Social-Studies-Nursery-2

This lesson note guide with keywords: Lesson-Note-Third-Term-Week-2-Social-Studies-Nursery-2 is written based one of the most circulated private school curriculum in Nigeria for pre-primary education.

Teachers’ Note

Social Studies teachers, just like teachers of other RNV subjects, must understand that their role in the class is much more than making the pupils to simply know and able to list the merits and demerit of negative and positive attitude to work. S/he is a mind changer, a motivator, a patriot and an ardent promoter of patriotism. Especially at this moment of moral decadence when “the popular is seen as the right” and indigenous national values are being defaced; the teacher enjoys the duty of re-orienting the pupils in his/her classes.

TOPIC

People who work for us – uniformed people e.g. police, army, traffic warden, road safety corps, etc.

LESSON OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following objectives:

Cognitive:

The pupils should be able to list the different kind of uniform people and identify or differentiate one from another.

Affective:

They should appreciate the significance and show respect for uniform people.

Psychomotor:

The pupils should be able to teach others about the relevance of uniformed people as well as to respect them.

PRESENTATION

The lesson is presented in order of the steps described below:

 Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher displays persons in the different uniforms and asks the pupils to identify each.

Invariably, the pupils will either be unable to identify or wrongly identify one or two of the uniform people. Hence, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall at the course of the lesson; identify each of the uniform people. Thereafter, the teacher explains the lesson objectives to the pupils.

Step 2: Uniform people and their work

Following step 1 above, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall now identify each of the uniform people and their work. Thereunto, s/he picks one (of the uniform people) at a time, as given in the table below, then names the agency and the work. The teacher explains the works so that the pupils see why they are relevant.

UNIFORM PEOPLE AND THEIR WORK

S/N

Uniform People

Their Work

1.The Military (Army, Navy, Air Force)Defend us and our land from her enemies
2.The Nigeria Police ForceProtect us from bad people and make people to follow the law
3.The Nigeria Custom ServiceWorks at the borders to stop bad things from entering into our land
4.The Nigeria Immigration ServiceMonitors and control how people leave and enter into the country
5.The Nigeria Prison ServiceGuide and control the prison and train the prisoners
6.The Nigeria Security and Civil Defence CorpsHelps the police to maintain peace and order and to save people whenever there is emergency
7.The Federal Road Safety CorpsMake people to use roads in the right way and punishes those that abuse road like motorists that over-speed and/or park their vehicles in the wrong place.
8.The Traffic WardenHelps to control the movement and parking of vehicles on the road to reduce accident
9.The Vehicle Inspection Service OfficersCheck to ensure that only good vehicles and qualified drivers move on the road.
10.The vigilantesHelp the police to arrest bad people and also settle quarrel in the communities

 

Note: [1] prior to explaining the duties of the various agencies given above, the teacher may ask the contributions of the pupils. S/he may do this by picking the uniform of each agency, then asking whether any of the pupils’ parent or relation has the given uniform (i.e. works with the agency). If any, the teacher may ask questions such as the name of the agency and the work such parent/relation performs.

For example, the teacher picks the police uniform, then asks whether any of the pupils’ parent/relation uses that uniform. If any, the teacher asks the pupil the name that persons such as that his /her parent/relation is called. Thereafter, the teacher may ask the pupil or the class what works such people perform.

[2]To make the pupils see the relevance of the uniformed people, the teacher should initiates discussion on what will happen if we don’t have each. For example, after discussing the Police; the teacher asks what will happen if there are no police.

[3] Due to some semblance or possible ambiguity in identifying the uniform of the different uniformed people, the teacher should teach the pupils how to recognize the work of a uniform person via the badge.

 Step 3: Respecting Uniform People

Succeeding the explanation of the work of the various uniform people, the teacher reiterates their relevance. S/he does this by emphasizing on what will happen if the society had not have their services. Thereafter, the teacher explains that since the uniformed people render important services, it is good and necessary for everyone to respect them. However, before listing the ways of respecting uniform people, the teacher categorically explains that the pupils ought not to fear uniformed people. The teacher differentiates that respecting uniformed people is not the same as being afraid of them. In reinforcement, the teacher notes that good and obedient people do not have to be afraid of uniformed people. Instead, good and obedient people need to respect uniformed people.

Subsequently, the teacher asks the pupils the ways good and obedient people may respect uniformed people. At the end of the ensuing contributions from the pupils,  or if there was no attempt, the teacher lists and explains the basic ways of respecting uniformed people as outlined below.

Ways of Respecting Uniformed People that work for us

Good and obedient people respect uniformed people by:

  • Obeying them
  • Not fighting them
  • Not insulting them
  • Praying for them
  • Teaching others to respect them

Note Writing and Summary

The teacher summarizes the lesson into a concise note – simplified to the level that the pupils would be able to read. S/he writes the note on the board for the pupils to copy down in their notes. While the pupils write, the teacher moves round to ensure that they are writing well. The board summary is provided below.

UNIFORMED PEOPLE WHO WORK FOR US

Uniformed people are people that do special work for us and wear uniform at their place of work.

UNIFORM PEOPLE AND THEIR WORK

S/N

Uniform People

Their Work

1.The Military (Army, Navy, Air Force)Defend us and our land from her enemies
2.The Nigeria Police ForceProtect us from bad people and make people to follow the law
3.The Nigeria Custom ServiceWorks at the borders to stop bad things from entering into our land
4.The Nigeria Immigration ServiceMonitors and control how people leave and enter into the country
5.The Nigeria Prison ServiceGuide and control the prison and train the prisoners
6.The Nigeria Security and Civil Defence CorpsHelps the police to maintain peace and order and to save people whenever there is emergency
7.The Federal Road Safety CorpsMake people to use roads in the right way and punishes those that abuse road like motorists that over-speed and/or park their vehicles in the wrong place.
8.The Traffic WardenHelps to control the movement and parking of vehicles on the road to reduce accident
9.The Vehicle Inspection Service OfficersCheck to ensure that only good vehicles and qualified drivers move on the road.
10.The vigilantesHelp the police to arrest bad people and also settle quarrel in the communities

Ways of Respecting Uniformed People that work for us

Good and obedient people respect uniformed people by:

  • Obeying them
  • Not fighting them
  • Not insulting them
  • Praying for them
  • Teaching others to respect them

EVALUATION

After the note writing, the teacher leads the pupils to read the note as many times as possible. While they read, the teacher identifies the difficult words; writes them out and lead the pupils to learn the spellings. After that, the teacher revises the entire lesson once again. In the end, s/he assesses the pupils’ understanding by giving them the following questions.

MCQ on UNIFORMED PEOPLE AND THEIR WORKS

  1. Which one is not a uniformed person?
    1. Teacher
    2. Police
    3. Soldier
  2. Which one of these uniformed people is not a military?
    1. The Vigilante
    2. The Navy
    3. The Air force
  3. Which uniform people fight and defend us and our land from our enemies?
    1. The Traffic Wardens
    2. The Road Safety
    3. The Military
  4. The work of the vigilante is to beat people? True             False
  5. If you forget the work of a uniformed person, how would you remember?
    1. Look up his badge
    2. Follow him to his place of work
    3. Stand and cry

 

 

Lesson Note: Third Term Week 2 – 3 Letter Work for Pre-Nursery

TOPIC

Learning names of objects through “Lucky Dip” and matching of objects with letters A-a – T-t

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following objectives:

  • Identify the each of the letters from Aa to Tt
  • Mention at least one object that begins with each letter
  • Develop awareness of the sound of each of the letters Aa – Tt

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as outlined below.

Step 1: Introduction

The teacher introduces the lesson by revising past lessons on recognition of letters. First, s/he asks the pupils whether they are still able to read letters A – Z. Therefore, the teacher leads the pupils to oral reading of letters A – Z. After this, s/he picking a letter at time asks the pupils what letter it is. For reinforcement, the teacher displays two letters then asks the pupils, one at a time, to pick a named letter from among the two. To conclude the letter recognition revision, the teacher repeats the last exercise several times – but each time, the teacher increases the number of letters from which the pupils will pick only one named letter.

Following the revision of oral reading and recognition of letters, the teacher introduces the week’s lesson proper. To do this, the teacher tells the pupils that since they are now able to read and recognize the letters; they will now learn how to read like people in higher classes or adults– S/he then asks if they like that. They probably would! Hence, the teacher explains that the first step to be able to read like adults or people in higher classes is to identify the sound of the letters. In furtherance of the explanation, the teacher reveals that the letters they read earlier only represents the sound. And also, the representation of the sound is contained in the spelling (names) of objects we see, uses, play with and talk about every day.

Succeeding this, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall be learning the names of some objects. After this but before proceeding to step two, the teacher cautions the pupils to listen attentively and participate in this learning else they will not be able to read like adults or people in higher classes.

Step 2: Identification of common objects starting with A – T

At this stage the teacher displays common objects – it could be the concrete models, a large wall chart or individual pictures of the objects – whose spellings starts with letters A – T. Afterwards, s/he points at each object – or if individual picture of the objects are being used, the teacher picks one at a time then asks the pupils the name of the object. For example, the teacher displays an apple then asks the pupils, “what is this (called)?” Below is a list of objects that the teacher could use.

COMMON OBJECTS STARTING WITH A – T

 

Apple

Ant

Ball

Bell

Banana

Biscuit

Basket

Cat

Car

Card

 

Cap

Cage

Dog

Doll

Door

Duck

Egg

Elephant

Fish

Flag

 

Fan

Goat

Gate

Hen

Hat

Hut

House

Ink

Jug

 

Juice – teacher should differentiate between juice and juice brand such as Five-Alive, bobo, Viju, e.t.c

 

Kettle

Kangaroo

Lamp

Lion

Lamb (teacher picks only one of Lamb and Lamp to avoid confusing the pupils)

Mango

Mat

Net

 

Nail

Nurse

Orange

Onion

Pencil

Pen

Pepper

Paper

Queen

 

Rat

Rice

Ram

Rain

Road

Ring

Sun

Snail

Star

Table

Tailor

 

 

The exercise in the last paragraph is repeated until the pupils demonstrate ability to identify the different objects.

Step 3: Basic Phonetic Sound of letters A – T

Once the teacher ascertains that the pupils are able to identify each of the objects; s/he proceeds to basic sound awareness – the teacher first of all explains the concept of sound at the most elementary level. S/he does this by teaching the pupils the basic sound of each of the letters A to T. The teacher explains that the sound of letter:

 

A is / æ /

B is /b/

C is /k/

D is /d/

E is / e/

F is /f/

G is /g/

H is /h/

I is /i/

J is / ʤ/

 

K is /k/

L is /l/

M is /m/

N is /n/

O is / əʊ̯ /

P is /p/

Q is /kw/

R is /r/

S is /s/

T is /t/

 

 

NOTE: The teacher is not to burden the pupils with any of the phonetic symbols above. Instead the teacher should use it to produce the sound of the corresponding letter. More so, it is not intended that pupils compulsorily learn how to produce the sound as they will do so in their phonetics or phonics– a basic awareness (i.e. recognizing which letter produces a named sound) suffice.

To ascertain whether the pupils have developed basic sound awareness after explaining the sound of each letter, the teacher makes a sound then asks the pupils to name the letter which produces the sound – this may be repeated with different sound. Following this, the teacher proceeds to step 4.

Step 4: Matching Common Objects Beginning with letters A – T to the corresponding letters: Lucky Dip

Succeeding step 3, the teacher proceeds to matching the objects to the corresponding beginning letters. To do this, s/he first of all calls the name of each object and asks the pupils to name the letter with the beginning sound of the named object. For example, the teacher calls Apple, with emphasis on the beginning sound / æ /; then asks the pupils the letter that produces that first sound.

After this, then the teacher leads the pupils to the Lucky Dip activity. The teacher puts a cutout pictures of the objects listed earlier inside the ‘Dip’ container. The number of the cutout pictures should be one more than the number of pupils in the class – one for each pupil and the teacher. After that, s/he [the teacher] tells the pupils they are going to play a game (known as Lucky Dip) in which everyone is going to play a part. Thereafter, s/he explains the game to the pupils:

Each of them will go to the Dip container, pick only one picture cutout; then tells the class what s/he picks in this format: I picked the picture of a (object), the first letter of (the object) is ______.

After the explanation/description of the game, the teacher demonstrates it then calls out the pupils, one after another to do same.

TIP: The teacher may keep reward for those that will successfully play their part.

READING AND EVALUATION

Subsequent to the Lucky Dip activity, the teacher leads the pupils to read A for Apple and Ant; B for Ball, Bell, Banana, Biscuit and Basket; e.t.c. several times.

After the reading, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding based on the lesson objectives.

FINAL COMMENT

[1]For the Lucky Dip exercise, the teacher should consider the special children such as those that are shy. Such children that are shy may not readily talk. Hence, suggestions are provided in our earlier post on How to teach Shy Children.

[2] In addition to returning users, about 1, 000 new users visit our lesson note thread every month. That means more people are finding our lesson notes useful. You might be helping someone by sharing the posts you find useful.

[3] We welcome suggestions, creative criticisms, questions and commendations. You can drop yours in the comment box anywhere on the website or contact us via [email protected] on social media using our handle @LeadinGuides. WhatsApp: +2348067689217

a game in which small prizes are concealed in a container and chosen at random by participants.

First Term Number Work Lesson Note for Pre-Nursery Week 4 – 6

Class: Pre-Nursery

Term: First, Week: 4-6

Subject: Number work

Topic: Oral counting of numbers 1-20

Writing of numbers 1-5

Recognition of numbers 1-10

 

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to:

  • Count numbers 1-20
  • Write numbers 1-5
  • Identify numbers 1-10
  • Demonstrate/internalize the concept of numerical values of numbers 1-5

PRESENTATION

The teacher delivers the lesson as in the following steps:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the writes the topic on the board and revises the previous lesson:

  • Reminds the pupils the meaning of numbers: a number is what tells us how many of a thing we have.
  • S/he tells them that there are many numbers because we can have many things.
  • Each of the many numbers has its special name and way it is written.
  • For example, they learned ten numbers in the last lessons.

After the last exposition, the teacher asks the pupils if they remember the ten numbers – they count together. Afterwards, teacher writes any number(s) between 0-5 and asks the pupils to name. Finally, the teacher asks which is greater between some given numbers.

These been done as stated, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall in the week’s lesson, learn more numbers.

Writing Numbers 1-5

Succeeding the introduction, the teacher tells the pupils that before they learn more numbers, they have to learn how to write some of the numbers they learned in the previous lessons. Hence, picking each one at a time, the teacher analyses, demonstrates and guides the pupils to form the numbers 1-5.

How to Write Number One (1)

This is a single vertical stroke (refer to pre-writing pattern). To form it, the teacher makes two dots such that one is directly above the other:

Then both dots are joined with a straight line:

How to Write Number Two (2)

This number has a curve, a slant line and a horizontal line. To form number 2, start with the curve:

Join the slant line:

And finally the horizontal line:

How to Write Number Three (3)

Number three is two curves joined. To form number 3, mark off three dots such that the dots are directly below the top – the middle being at the centre:

Then draw a curve from the top dot to the middle:

And from the middle to the bottom:

How to Write Number Four (4)

Number four has three lines – two verticals and a horizontal. To form number 4, draw the first vertical stroke:

Then from the bottom end of the vertical line, draw a horizontal:

And finally draw another vertical across the horizontal:

How to Write Number Five (5)

Number five has three strokes – a horizontal, a vertical and a curve. To form it, draw the horizontal:

Then the vertical

And finally the curve:

For each number, the teacher analyses or describes the formation as given; demonstrates how to form it while the pupils do the same.

Please note that you may need to practice some few times before the pupils perfect the notation – be patient.

 

Counting numbers One (1) – Twenty (20)

After assessing the pupils’ performance in writing number 1-5, the teacher applauds them and gives them feedback – This is basically telling them specifically, what they need to improve upon. Afterwards, the teacher tells them that they are now ready and going to learn more numbers – she may then first of all lead them to count 1-10. Thereafter, the teacher picks each of numbers 11 through 20, explains its value and teaches the pupils the correct pronunciation as described below:

 

  • Tells the pupils that the next number after ten is eleven and is written as 11.
  • Tells them that eleven is greater than 10 and all the numbers below 10.
  • If necessary, reiterates in local dialect.
  • Pronounce the number distinctively and let the pupils repeat after him/her several times.
  • The teacher then gives the pupils or directs them to pick eleven counters
  • Finally, the pupils count the counters all together.
  • Move to next number 12, 13, 14, 15 16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

General counting with stand counters

After the explanation, the leads the pupils into general counting:

  • S/he puts up the stand counter of 20 counters. Then sliding each counter to the other side, s/he and the pupils count until the counters finishes from one side. This is repeated by sliding each counter back to the original position and again.

Group and individual counting

After the general counting, the teacher further strengthens the pupils’ memorization of the names and order of numbers through group counting:

  • The teacher groups the pupils into pairs
  • Going to each group and while the pupils watch and follow, the teacher counts different numbers of counters for each pupil;
  • The teacher directs each pupil to count differently given number out of his/her counters and give it to the partner.
  • Individual pupil counts the new number of counters in their possession and tells the teacher.
  • The teacher confirms the number, and then makes the pupils to repeat the process – exchange some counters and count.

 

Step 4: Recognition of Numbers 1 – 10

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each of the numbers has its own way of being written. Thus, s/he explains that they are now going to learn how each number is written – for the week only 1 – 10.

Consequently, the teacher starts from zero and forth; explains that:

  • Zero means nothing and is written as 0
  • One is a number which means – (in dialect) and is written as 1
  • Two is a number which means – (in dialect) and is written as 2
  • Ten is a number which means – (in dialect) and is written as 10.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher writes the number 1 -10, serially on the board or uses the large number chart, then points at each number and asks the pupils to name the number – then in reverse, the teacher calls the name of a number then calls pupils points at each.

The teacher may call the local names of numbers and asks pupils to mention the English equivalents.

EVALUATION

The teacher assesses the pupils understanding of the lesson by giving them the following exercises.

Exercise 1: Oral counting

The teacher asks the pupils (either individually or in small groups) to count numbers 1 -20.

Exercise 2: Recognition of numbers 1 -10

  • The teacher uses a number chart or a handwritten numbers 1 – 10; points at each number and ask individual pupil to name it – then the reverse.
  • The teacher calls the local names of numbers and demands pupils to mention the English equivalents.
  • The teacher gives the pupils the matching exercise contained in Systematic Numeracy.

Exercise 3: Numerical Values

  • Teacher collects some objects (recommended is biscuit or sweet); divides the object into two – one being more than the other.
  • The teacher asks pupils to count each group; thereafter, reminds the pupil the number of each group, then asks the pupils to pick either the smaller or greater.
  • Then the teacher gives the corresponding exercise (in Systematic Numeracy)

 

Which is greater?

  1. 2 and 4
  2. 6 and 4
  3. count and circle the greater/lesser
  4. fill in missing number

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents for needed home assistance.

 

 

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First Term Pre – Writing Lesson Note for Pre-Nursery Week 4-5

SUBJECT: PRE-WRITING ACTIVITIES

Term: First Term

Week: 4-5

Class: Pre-Nursery

Topic: Strokes making: Vertical, Horizontal, Slant

Objectives

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to do the following:

Cognitive: Identify the three straight line patterns in writing.

Affective: Differentiate between the lines

Psychomotor: Arrange sticks into vertical, horizontal and slanted position to form net or a mesh.

TEACHERS ACTIVITIES

The teacher shall collect straw (pipes) to be used for the mesh-making activities. Alternative to making all straw (pipes) mesh, a combination of four straw (pipes) and thread may be used. To make the mesh more aesthetic different colours of straw/rope may be used.

PRESENTATION

To deliver the lesson, the teacher follows the step given below:

Step: Introduction

The teacher introduces the lesson by revising the previous (2-3) week’s lesson. S/he directs them to grasp the pencil the tripod way. Thence, the teacher moves round and ascertain that the pupils have done accordingly – correcting them if necessary. Once s/he ascertains that the pupils still remember how to hold pencil correctly as s/he taught them earlier; the teacher commends them. Thereafter, s/he tells them that they have made a great effort and are rapidly moving towards becoming an expert writer – they soon will be writing like adults!

Having reminded the pupils of the end objectives in the foregoing sentences; the teacher tells the pupils that they are now going to learn another thing expert writer do when writing – that is, making different straight strokes. The teacher further explains that by learning how to make the different straight strokes, they will also learn to make many things. After this explanation, the teacher asks if they are ready to learn the strokes. Whence, proceeds to next step.

Step 2: The different straight strokes or writing patterns.

The pupils’ affirmative answer to the last question in the previous step should make the teacher lead the pupils to step 2 – “s/he tell them OK, let’s begin!”

Consequently, the teacher explains that the first thing the pupils need to know are the different straight strokes that expert writers make when writing.  In a follow up, s/he explains the meaning of the word, “straight” with examples and demonstrations. Thereafter, the teacher explains that there are three kinds of straight strokes they will learn – vertical, horizontal and slanted. Therefore, the teacher makes these strokes on the board and labels them accordingly.

After that, the teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce each kind of the straight strokes. S/he pronounces each and the pupils pronounce after him/her.

NOTE: Pronunciation should be done gradually at first. Break each word into component syllable:

Vertical – Ver – ti – cal

Horizontal – Ho – ri – zon – tal

Slanted – S – lan – tin

For each word, pronounce and let the pupils repeat after you, a syllable at a time; then gradually combine the syllables to form the pronunciation of the word.

Succeeding the pronunciation exercise; and after the pupils demonstrate ability to pronounce each word correctly, the teacher explains the meaning of each stroke.

  • Vertical strokes are the straight lines that are standing.
  • Horizontal strokes are the straight lines that are sleeping or lying straight.
  • Slanted strokes are straight lines that are fallen – either the right or left.

To aid memorization, the teacher may make the explanation into rhyme of wordings such as this:

Slanted is falling

Horizontal is sleeping

Vertical is standing

Now I know my strokes!

Step 3: Objects with straight writing patterns or strokes

Having explained and ensured that the pupils are now able to pronounce and recognize/differentiate the strokes, the teacher explains that the strokes are all around us. Many things are made by joining parts that are vertical, horizontal and slanted. The teacher gives examples with concrete objects – door frames, window frames, net, mesh…….

For each object (which the teacher should have a sample of, either real or photographed), the teacher indentifies the vertical, horizontal and slanted side.

Succeeding this, the teacher picks one (window frame, net or mesh) and tells the pupils that they are going to make it in the class. This leads to the activity described below:

HOW TO MAKE A NET FRAME USING STRAW (PIPES) AND THREAD

  1. Arrange four straws (pipes) into a square frame
  2. Drills holes of equal interval along the four straw (pipes)
  3. Use one colour of thread to run through the holes from left to right and vice and versa such that each thread is slanted and parallel to the diagonal.
  4. From the points where the slanted thread meets above, run another colour of thread to the corresponding meeting point of two slanted thread below such that the thread are vertical and parallel to the vertical frames. Then repeat same for the meeting point between slanted thread at the left and right side such that the thread are horizontal and also parallel to the horizontal frames.
  5. A net frame is formed.

At the end of this activity, the teacher may evaluate the pupils’ ability to identify the different straight strokes. S/he does this by asking them which colour of thread is vertical, horizontal and slanted. Also, with the instructions and materials given; the teacher may give the pupils this activity as home (work) play.

Step 4: Forming the straight writing patterns or strokes.

With the exercise in the previous step (3), the pupils should have developed adequate knowledge of vertical, horizontal and slanted strokes. Hence, they are ready to form the strokes.

Teaching A Child How to Form Vertical Strokes

The teacher begins with vertical strokes.

First, the teacher makes two or three of each of the strokes, one at a time, and directs the pupils to do so FREELY. The objective of this part is not to achieve perfect vertical strokes but to create the image of vertical strokes in their brain and lay foundation for coordination. I recommend Evans Writing Workbook

Secondly, the teacher introduces the pupils to controlled writing pattern formation as described below:

  1. Draw rectangles and liken it to the four straw (pipes) – frames
  2. Makes dots along the top and bottom lines to be likened to the holes.
  3. Then join one or two corresponding dots for the pupils to see and likens it with the rope.
  4. Directs the pupils to join other dots as in (3) above.

NOTE: The rectangles should have heights equal to the gap between two blue lines in 2M sheet of exercise book. With time, as the child progresses, the teacher eliminates the rectangles. There are already drawn lines for this activity in Evans Writing Textbook.

Teaching A Child How to Form Horizontal Strokes

  1. Draw rectangles whose height spans many blue lines in normal sheet of exercise book and whose breath is half of the gap between the blue lines.
  2. In between each blue line, mark two dots along the opposite sides of the height of the rectangle.
  3. Join one or two corresponding dots for the pupils to see.
  4. Let the pupils join other dots.

How to form slanted strokes

  1. Draw rectangles with heights equal to the gap between two blue lines in normal sheet of exercise book.
  2. Marks alternating dots along the top and bottom width of the rectangle.
  3. Join each leading alternate dots for pupils to see.
  4. Directs pupils to repeat.

EVALUATION

Prior to concluding the lesson, the teacher revises the lesson then assesses the pupils’ understanding. S/he does the later by giving them the exercises below:

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by collecting and marking the pupils’ notes. Thereafter, s/he records their performance in the progress report sheet so as to serve as a guide for next activity. It necessary, the teacher may also provide feedback to parents including on the child’s achievement so far, what assistance the child may need at home and how to go about the assistance.

First Term Lesson Note on Number Work for Pre-Nursery Week 2 – 3

Introduction to this post with keywords: First Term Lesson Note Number Work Pre-Nursery Week 2 – 3

Number work is the foundation of Mathematics in later years. It aims to introduce mathematical concepts in a simple but scientific way to the pupils in early years. Unfortunately, most Early Years Teachers do not adopt the scientific and systematic approach in their classrooms. Learning occurs in a systematic manner – in stages. If a step is missed or skipped, learning becomes more difficult and uninteresting to learners. This lesson note adopts systematic approach to introduce number concepts. The note is written in-line with NERDC curriculum for Pre-Nursery. Thus it is meant to be delivered in regular Nursery school. However, parents and older people can also use it to guide their young ones.


CLASS:

PRE- NURSERY

SUBJECT:

NUMBER WORK

TERM:

FIRST TERM

WEEK:

2 AND 3

TOPIC:

ORAL COUNTING OF OBJECTS 1 – 10

OBJECTIVES:

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to:

  • Counts objects between 1 – 10
  • Recognize numbers 1-5
  • Develop the concept of numerical values – determine the greatest of a group of objects.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS:

Counters and number charts

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as given below

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher picks a set of the same object (say pencils, sweets etc) in both hands. The number of such object in one hand should be more than the number in another hand. The teacher thence show the pupils the items in both hands and ask the pupils which hand contains more of the items. He or she receives as many attempts as possible. If a child gets it wrong, the teacher declines friendly and jokingly but encouraging further attempts. When a child gets it right, the teacher appreciates such pupil then asks politely how that child knew or was able to identify the greater.

After the ensuing discussion, the teacher tells the pupils that there is a way people use to tell the greater things from the lesser- this is called numbers. After that, the teacher tells the pupils that they are going to learn numbers and how to know the greater of two things – he/she makes them to pronounce number correctly.

Step 2: Meaning of numbers?

The teacher explains that a number is what tells us how many or how much things we have.

Teacher consolidates explanation with practical examples:

  1. He or she collects some (not more than two) counters and tells the pupils that he or she had that number of counters
  • He or she puts down all the counters then ask the pupils how many counter has he or she now. The pupils should answer “none!” or “nothing!”
  • The teacher explains that “none” or “nothing” is a number known as ‘zero’ and written as 0.
  • He or she teaches them how to pronounce zero correctly by pronouncing it several while the pupils repeats after him/her.
  1. Again the teacher collect or pick only one of the counter then ask the pupils the number of counter in his or her hands – a child should probably get it as one. Hence, the teacher explains that one is another number which is written as 1 – Teacher reiterates with local dialect if (especially) in rural area.

After the explanation, the teacher teaches the pupils how to pronounce the number, one correctly by pronouncing it several times while the pupils repeats after him or her.

Example is repeated for number 2, 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 & 10 counters one after another.

After the last example, the teacher processes to step 3.

Step 3: Demonstration of numbers

To further help the pupils internalize the concept of number and its values, the teacher leads the pupils to demonstrate the number concept:

                Using counters

  • The teacher distributes counters to the pupils and keeps some for himself/herself
  • S/he then tells the pupils that they shall pick the number of counter s/he would name then raise it.
  • After that, the teacher names numbers between 1 and 10 randomly, one after the other, for the pupils to pick and lift up. Each time, the teacher sees that the pupils picked the correct number of counter s/he has named.

Using Fingers

After several practice with counters, the teacher directs the pupils to drop the counters. Thereafter, s/he explains or tells the pupils that there is a part of our body that is known as “fingers” – s/he asks if any of the pupils could tell the class which. After that, the teacher shows the pupils fingers – and may even refer to the name in the local dialect.

Succeeding the explanation, the teacher raises a finger and asks the pupils to say the number of fingers he/she has raised. As may be necessary, question may be directed at individual pupil at first to get their attention.

The teacher repeats the exercise with more fingers – 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.

Following this, the teacher may direct pupils to raise a named number of fingers. S/he may also give the pupils the following stage evaluation questions.

STAGE EVALUATION QUESTIONS
  1. How fingers do we have on one hand?
  2. Both hands together, how many fingers are there?
  3. Display the picture of a dog or using one of the pupil’s pet dog, if there is any, the teacher may ask – how many legs has the dog?
  4. Count the buttons on your school uniform, how many buttons are there?
  5. How many legs have your chair/desk?
  6. How many windows do your class have?
  7. How many covers does your water-bottle have?

Step 4: Memorization of Numbers

At this stage, the pupils must have developed the concept of numbers. However, they may not be able to remember names of numbers and the order of numbers. Hence, the activities in this step aids memorization of the names and order of numbers.

Counting

Traditionally, rote memorization has been achieved by repetition. Hence, the first activity should be repeated counting, first in pairs:

  1. The teacher pairs the pupils
  2. S/he goes to each group, while the pupils watch on, counts different number of counters for each pupil.
  3. After that, the teacher directs each pupil to count a given number out of his/her and give it to the partner. Afterwards, the pupils count to confirm the number the partner has given him or her then adds it to the ones he initially had left and count the new number of counter is his/her possession. The pupils repeat this several times while the teacher monitors them and takes note of those that may not get the counting so as to decide on necessary aid.

General counting

After the pair counting, the teacher leads the pupils in general counting – by the entire class.

The teacher puts up a large counter stand or an improvised one of ten counters. Then, sliding the counters, one at a time, to the other side; s/he counts and the pupils repeat after him/her. The teacher and the class repeat this by sliding the counters back to the original position and again.

Step 5: Recognition of Numbers 0 -5

After the counting exercises, the teacher reminds the pupils that each number has a special way it is written. Thus, that they are going to learn how each number is written – for the week, starting from 0 – 5.

Following this, the teacher starts again from zero and forth; s/he explains that:

  1. Zero means nothing (repeat in local dialect) and it is written as 0 (teacher writes 0 or shows/places the model if there is).
  2. One means ______ (in local dialect) and we write one like this – 1(teacher writes 1 or shows/places the model if there is).
  • Two means ____ (in local dialect) and we write two like this – 2(teacher writes 2 or shows/places the model if there is).
  1. Three means ______ (in local dialect) and we write three like this – 3(teacher writes 3 or shows/places the model if there is).
  2. Four means _____ (in local dialect) and we write four like this – 4 (teacher writes 4 or shows/places the model if there is).
  3. Five means ______ (in local dialect) and we write five like this – 5 (teacher writes 5s or shows/places the model if there is)..

After the forgoing explanation, the teacher points at each number and then ask the pupils to name the number. Thereafter, the teacher names a number and asks a volunteer pupils to come and points at the number.

EVALUATION

The achievements of the objectives of the lesson are evaluated or determined in three oral activities as given below:

Activity 1: Counting of numbers 1 – 10

The teacher asks the pupils, either individually or in small groups, to count numbers 1 – 10. They first of all do so with counters or children abacus, and then do it without.

Activity 2: Recognition of Numbers

  1. The teacher writes numbers 1 – 5 and then asks the pupils to point at the number that s/he would name. He then names numbers 1 – 5, first serially forward and backward then randomly
  2. The teacher points each of the numbers then asks the pupils to name it.
  3. The matching exercise contained in our System Numeracy Textbook is given to the pupils.
  4. The teacher calls the local name of a number then asks the pupils to tell his/her the English name of the number.

Activity 3: Numerical Values

  1. The teacher collects some biscuits/sweets; divides it into two groups – one being more than the other; and then asks the pupils to count each group. Afterwards, the teacher reminds the pupil the number of biscuit/sweet in each group and asks the pupil to pick either the greater or lesser. The teacher regroups the items and repeats the exercise.
  2. The teacher gives the pupils the count and circle exercise in our Systematic Numeracy Textbook
  3. The teacher gives the pupils the circle the greater or lesser exercise in our Systematic Numeracy Textbook.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by recording the pupils’ performance and if necessary, providing feedback to the parents of a child that needs home assistance.


There you you have it! The complete guide to take charge of your class and make learning fun for pupils. Please send us your feedback below so we can serve you better.

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