Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

Introduction to Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

I wrote this Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 based on the Nigerian National Early Childhood Education Curriculum. Particularly, I used the unified Scheme of Work on Social Habit for Kindergarten class. The Unified Scheme of Work on Social Habit for Kindergarten is part of our collection of official Pre-Primary Teaching Schemes for Nigerian Schools.

All of our Schemes of Work are from official sources and are suitable for use in the 36 states. Click here to view and download Complete Schemes of Work for all classes and subjects for Pre-Nursery; Nurseries; Kindergarten; Primary; JSS and SSS. Alternatively, click here to chat with us directly. Or, click here to download the schemes from our store on paystack.

On Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

We are at a point in History when violation of the rights of every child is on the increase. Parents and concerned members of the society are always afraid of the many dangers that threaten children on a daily basis. Invariably, the best and first security against these threats, is to arm every child with appropriate knowledge. And what better time to initiate this process than the time just before formal schooling begins?

According to the official definition in Nigeria, Kindergarten is the switchover class from preschool to basic education. Hence, the educational research and development arm of the ministries of education in its professional judgement; placed the topic in this lesson note to prepare ahead.

Consequently, schools and teachers must spare no effort in ensuring that pupils fully attain the objectives of this topic. Similarly, the objectives of this topic are some key foundations parents should look out for before sending their preschoolers to primary school.

We wrote this lesson note to make it easy for both school teachers and parents to easily help their Kindergarten children achieve the objectives.


Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1

OBJECTIVES

At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to:

Cognitive

  • Define child rights
  • Mention at 10 rights of a child
  • Mention the rights they enjoy and those they are denied

Affective

  • Demonstrates observance of applicable rights when working with younger children

Psychomotor

  • Colour/paint sketched copies depicting child rights

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as follows:

Step 1 – Introduction

To introduce the lesson, the teacher paints a scenario and asks a question that depict the meaning of “human” right – preferably through story:

First Scenario: to introduce human right to children

Once upon a time, there are two children. The name of the first is Nnamdi. He is 5 years old. The name of the second child is Damilola. She is 3 years old. Their parents are Mr. & Mrs. Abubakar. The children attend Children’s Day School.

One day, their parents dropped them off at the school entrance. But since Damilola was still toddling, she couldn’t cross the door threshold.

Discussion: What do you think Nnamdi did when he saw that Damilola is unable to cross the door threshold?

Indeed, he helped Damilola to cross without been told!

DISCUSSION: Why did Nnamdi helped Damilola without been told to do so?

Yes, because she is a “child”.

Second Scenario: to introduce human right to children

Once upon a time, there are two children. The name of the first is Nnamdi. He is 5 years old. The name of the second child is Damilola. She is 3 years old. Their parents are Mr. & Mrs. Abubakar. The children attend Children’s Day School. At school, Nnamdi has a friend. The name of Nnamdi’s friend is Gbedeojo. Gbedeojo is also 5 years old.

One day at school, during the first break, Damilola and Gbedeojo ate all their food. But Nnamdi kept a little part of his food until lunch time. When it was lunch, all the children were hungry. But only Nnamdi had a little part of his food left. The little part will not be enough for neither Nnamdi alone, Nnamdi and Damilola his sister nor the three of them. The food will only be enough for Damilola because she was younger. Damilola is already crying of hunger. And she won’t stop crying until she eats to the fill.

Discussion: What do you think Nnamdi did?

No, Nnamdi did not eat all the remaining part of his food alone. Instead, he took a few bites and gave the larger remaining part to Damilola. Damilola ate and was satisfied.

DISCUSSION: Why did Nnamdi not eat the remaining part of his food alone nor give it to his but to Damilola, after all she ate all of hers alone?

Yes, because Damilola is a child.

NOTES:

Teacher should replace emphasized words (names) with those from the locality that the pupils can relate with. In addition, teacher should tell the story in a manner the pupils will understand – use local dialect, and emphasize if necessary. Particularly, sketch or source for pictorial illustrations which to show the pupils as you tell the story. This aids faster comprehension.

Concluding Introduction

Following the discussion that will ensue either of the narrations above, the teacher reiterates that Damilola enjoyed the benefits accorded her because she was a child. Further, the teacher explains that human beings instinctively knows that a child is deserve to enjoy some things – not for any reason but because s/he is a child.

Following these, teacher tells the pupils that they shall learn about the things that every child – like and including them – deserve to enjoy.

Step 2 – Meaning of Child Rights

Child Rights are the good way of living that every child is deserve to enjoy in order for them to be happy and develop well into responsible adults.

Teacher explains this definition thoroughly with the help of charts.

Good way of living

This includes what a child eats (nourishment), the environment of a child, what a child does, what a child is taught, how a child is treated, etc. The teacher displays contrasting pictures of each of these – one idea, and the other below desirable standard of living.

Every child

The teacher explains that child right is not only for some children from a particular country, race, tribe or social class. Instead, child right applies to all children all over the world. Children are people that are not up to eighteen (18) years of age – teacher stresses this.

Reason for Child Rights

Finally, the teacher explains the benefit of child rights and what will happen when there are not child rights.

1.       To be happy

Observing child rights makes all children happy (image or video of happy children). And when there are no child rights, children are sad (image or video of sad children) – doesn’t mean that every time a child is sad, there is absence of child rights though☺.

2.       Develop well

Teacher explains that develop means to grow. So, to develop well means to grow well – physically (body) and psychologically (the way they think, understand, feel and behave). Use appropriate images or videos of children to demonstrate proper and improper development.

3.        Become Responsible adults

Teacher explains that children that enjoy child rights grow up to become responsible adults. Adults are people that are eighteen years and above. Responsible is to do the good things that are expected of someone – teacher stresses meaning of adults and responsible. Thereafter, s/he emphasizes thoroughly that children who enjoy child rights grow up to become responsible adults otherwise, irresponsible – use appropriate images or videos to demonstrate responsible and irresponsible adults.

Stage Evaluation Questions

After explaining the meaning of child rights as I have written above, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding before proceeding to the remaining part of the lesson.

  1. The good way of living that every child deserves to enjoy is called ____________
    1. Right child
    2. Child rights
  2. A child is someone that is not up to _________________ years
    1. 14
    2. 18
  3. Child rights are for all the children in ____________
    1. Nigeria
    2. The whole world
  4. Doing the good things that is expected of someone is called ______________
    1. Responsible
    2. Adult
  5. Someone that is 16 years is a _____________
    1. Child
    2. Adult
  6. Someone that is 19 years is a ___________
    1. Child
    2. Adult
  7. Mention three things that will happen if there is no child rights

Step 3 – List of Child Rights

After the teacher ascertains that the pupils understood the meaning of child rights, s/he leads them to list out the child rights. The teacher uses appropriate charts to explain each thoroughly:

The rights of every child in Nigeria are:

1.       Right to Good birth

It is the responsibility of the parents to make sure they can provide a safe environment for their unborn child. This includes proper medical attention and care from conception, birth, and throughout childhood years in a new-born services unit or paediatric centre.

2.       Right to identity

  1. Right to family life
  2. Right to private life
  3. Right to protection from harm
  4. Right to good food and health
  5. Right to free quality education
  6. Right to government responsibility
  7. Right to freedom of thought & religion
  8. Right to freedom from discrimination
  9. Right to freedom of movement
  10. Right to freedom of association
  11. Right to leisure and cultural activities
  12. Right to dignity of the child
  13. Right to freedom from contracts

After mentioning each, the teacher explains what it means thoroughly with examples of common social experiences – refer to the Nigerian Child’s Right Act 2003 (in bibliography for explanation). S/he does this with the aid of charts, pictures and videos (where possible).

Special Notes

While explaining, teacher should communicate desirable social skills that is expected of the pupils towards each other and younger children. For example, when explaining rights to identity; charge pupils not to bully other children by labelling them with undesirable name. Also, discourage hitting other children as a way to observe the right to dignity of the child.

Others include caring for younger children as a way to observe right to protection from harm. And tolerance as a way to observe right to freedom from discrimination.

Similarly, for schools that observes it; this is also a great time to introduce activities such as Food Bank Drive for the World Children’s Day celebration – being on 20th November.

Stage Evaluation Questions

Before the teacher proceeds to the last part of the lesson, s/he assesses the pupils’ understanding of the rights of a child. S/he does this by giving them the following exercises:

Exercise 1 – Painting/Colouring Sketches of Child Rights

The teacher makes outlines/sketches of pictures depicting each of the rights of a child just as the sample below. Then, s/he leads the pupils to identify the right that the sketch represents. Afterwards, s/he leads the pupils to paint/colour the sketch.

Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 - National Child Day Activity
Source: Government of Canada’s National Child Day: Activity kit
Exercise 2 – Oral /Written Test on Child Rights

The teacher prepares and asks the pupils questions towards identifying child rights within daily social circles – questions to be included when updating this note.

Exercise 3 – Observing Interaction Between Children

Finally, the teacher pays attention to how the pupils interact with one another and younger children for hints of improvement – and to encourage areas of development where necessary.

Step 4 – The Nigerian Child’s Act (Law)

In the final part of the lesson, the teacher explains to the pupils that Nigeria made Child Rights into law in 2003 – as such, the law is called The Child Right Acts 2003. S/he explains further, this means that any states that sign the law; then people in that state can be arrested and punished if they violate any of the Child Rights.

The teacher goes further and reveals that only eleven states are yet to sign the Child Right Act. These states are Bauchi, Yobe, Kano, Sokoto, Adamawa, Borno, Zamfara, Gombe, Katsina, Kebbi, and Jigawa.

SUMMARY

Before the summative assessment, the teacher summarizes the lesson into a concise note. Then, s/he writes it for the pupils to copy into their exercise books.

Child’s Right

Meaning

Child Rights are the good way of living that every child is deserve to enjoy in order for them to be happy and develop well into responsible adults.

Children are people that are not up to eighteen (18) years of age.

Reasons for Child’s Right
  1. To be happy
  2. To develop well
  3. To become responsible adults
The Rights of a Child

The rights of a child are:

  1. Right to good birth
  2. Right to identity
  3. Right to family life
  4. Right to private life
  5. Right to protection from harm
  6. Right to good food and health
  7. Right to free quality education
  8. Right to government responsibility
  9. Right to freedom of thought & religion
  10. Right to freedom from discrimination
  11. Right to freedom of movement
  12. Right to freedom of association
  13. Right to leisure and cultural activities
  14. Right to dignity of the child
  15. Right to freedom from contracts

Nigeria made the child’s rights into law in 2003. And this law is called the Child’s Rights Act 2003.

EVALUATION

Prior to concluding the lesson, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding of the lesson. S/he does this by giving them appropriate exercises based on the content.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes Lesson Note – First Term Kindergarten Social Habit Week 1 – by marking the pupils’ exercises. Then, s/he records the marks and provides appropriate feedbacks.

S/he may also lead the class to concentrate more on preparing for the World Children’s Day in November.


Please let us know what you think about this lesson guide through the feedback form below and/or in the comment box.

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Bibliography

Adebowale, N. (2019, May 11). UPDATED: 11 states in northern Nigeria yet to pass child rights law — UNICEF Official. Retrieved from Premium Times Nigeria: https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/more-news/329511-12-states-in-northern-nigeria-yet-to-pass-child-rights-law-unicef-official.html

Federal Republic of Nigeria. (2003). CHILD’S RIGHT ACT, 2003. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj0jryvxZTzAhVt7OAKHb5JBpEQFnoECAMQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.refworld.org%2Fpdfid%2F5568201f4.pdf&usg=AOvVaw0VZ8P1oBA_nagObSxPRsKE

Makati Medical Centre. (2019, October 30). Celebrating National Children’s Month: The 12 Rights of a Child. Retrieved from Makati Medical Centre: https://www.makatimed.net.ph/news-and-exhibits/news/celebrating-national-childrens-month

UNICEF. (2009). CHILD-FRIENDLY SCHOOLS MANUAL. New York: UNICEF. Retrieved from https://www.unicef.org/documents/child-friendly-schools-manual

Wikipedia. (2021, February 16). Child Rights Act in Nigeria. Retrieved from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_Rights_Act_in_Nigeria