FIRST TERM BASIC TECHNOLOGY LESSON NOTE FOR PRIMARY ONE WEEK 1-2

Spread the love

Introduction to First-Term-Basic-Technology-Lesson-Note-Primary-One-Week-1-2

This First-Term-Basic-Technology-Lesson-Note-Primary-One-Week-1-2 is prepared based on (Olatoye, The Scheme of Work plus 20 things You should Know about the New 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum, 2016, pp. 103-127). (Olatoye, 2016) drew the Scheme of Works in line with the new Standard Basic Technology Curriculum (9-year Basic Edition) by the Nigerian Educational Research & Development Council. Basic Technology is one of the four separate but related subjects compressed to form the composite Basic Science and Technology in the new national curriculum. The other subjects are Basic Science, Physical and Health Education and Information Technology (IT) – formerly Computer Studies. Accordingly, this note is written to be delivered in the first and second week of the first term of the academic year.

Basic Technology teachers must understand that this is a practical subject. Hence, the success of its delivery stretches beyond the cognitive objectives. A Basic Technology teacher is a demonstrator, mind influencer and a motivator that inspires his/her student to DO.  As a result, s/he delivers the class by demonstration and motivation while majoring his/her performance by what the pupils are able TO DO at the end of the lesson.

First-Term-Basic-Technology-Lesson-Note-Primary-One-Week-1-2

TEACHER: Ankpa PiusJoe (WhatsApp: 08067689217)

SCHOOL: LeadinGuides Educational Technology

DATE

PERIOD

DURATION

AGE

CLASS

CLASS COMPOSITION:

SUBJECT:

  • Basic Science and Technology
  • Theme 2: Basic Technology

TOPIC: Meaning and benefits of Technology

REFERENCES

  1. Ajogwu(PhD), E. Standard Schemen)s of Work in line with National Curricular (UBE Edition) for Primary 1-3 (Lower Basic). Lesam Educational .
  2. Asun, P., Bajah, S. T., Ndu, F. C., Oguntonade, C. B., & Youdeowei, A. (2011). Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools Pupils’ Book 1. Lagos: Longman Nigeria Plc.
  3. National Teachers’ Institute (NTI); Universal Basic Education Commission (UBEC). (2010). Manual for Capacity Building Workshops of Teachers under the Federal Teachers’ Scheme (FTS) on Basic Science and Technology. Kaduna: National Teachers’ Institute (NTI).
  4. Nigerian Educational Research and DevelopmentCouncil (NERDC). (2011). Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools 1. Lagos: West African Book Publishers (WABP) Limited .
  5. Nigerian Educational Research and DevelopmentCouncil (NERDC). (2011). Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools Workbook 1. Lagos: West African Book Publishers (WABP) Limited.
  6. Nigerian Educational Research and DevelopmentCouncil (NERDC). (2012). Teachers’ Guides for the Revised 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum (BEC). Lagos: Nigerian Educational Research and DevelopmentCouncil (NERDC).
  7. Ogunniyi, M. B., Obed, U., OKebukola, P. O., & Mahmoud, I. (2010). Macmillan Basic Science and Technology for Primary Schools (UBE Edition) Book 1. Lagos: Macmillan Nigeria Publishers Limited.
  8. Olatoye, T. A. (2016). The Scheme of Work for Primary One Plus 20 Things you should know about the New 9-Year Basic Education Curriculum. Lagos: KR Publications.
  9. Science Teachers Association of NIgeria (STAN). (2011). STAN BAsic Science and Technology for Primary Schools (UBE Edition) Book 1. Ibadan: University Press Plc.

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

  • Board and marker/chalk
  • Digital display
  • Video clip/slides on brief history of
    • Transportation
    • Communication
  • Video of primitive way of doing things and modern method equivalent
    • Making fire using stone versus using match
    • Manual farm work versus mechanical farming
    • Grinding with grinding-stone versus using grinding engine
    • Falling tree with axe versus using chain saw e.t.c.
  • If digital display is not available, charts should be used for oral narration of the above.
  • Materials for project: cartons, cardboard, gum, masking tape and pair of scissors.

OBJECTIVES

Cognitive: At the end of the lesson, the pupils should be able to define technology, list the benefits of technology and products of technology.

Affective: The pupils should develop and show interest in the subject and seek to apply their knowledge to make new thing or solve problem.

Psychomotor: The pupils should be able to create a classroom (applying what they learned in science for the week) model made out of carton.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The pupils have learned from adverts and probably believe that technology relates to computers and complex machines

PREVIOUS KNOWLEDGE

The teacher should have briefly explained the meaning of technology in earlier Basic Science lesson. While some pupils may be familiar with the term Information Technology, Information and Communication Technology or Computer Technology; others might not have heard the terms before.

METHOD OF TEACHING

The teacher delivers the lesson through Induction, discussion and demonstration.

TEACHER’S ACTIVITIES

The teacher will thoroughly explain the meaning of technology. S/he will also inspire or motivate the pupils towards selflessness, demonstrate how to create the classroom model, regulate discussion and access pupils’ understanding.

LEARNER’S ACTIVITIES

The pupils shall actively participate in the lesson by listening, asking and answering questions. At the end of the lesson, the pupils shall carryout a mini project and make presentation on it.

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson as in the following steps:

Step 1: Introduction

To introduce the topic, the teacher presents a modern innovation (i.e. product of technology) and the corresponding olden form to the pupils. Then the teacher and the pupils, together, list out the uses/functions of the product. For example, I suggest:

Product

Uses of product

Olden form

Stove Cooking Open fire/woodstove – firewood/charcoal
Hammer Driving nails Stone
Book Writing on Slate

NOTE: the teacher should use only one of these products or any one other suitable product to avoid time wastage. In this note, I use stove to illustrate. In place of the real object, the teacher may use suitable chart.

After identifying the product and its functions or uses with the pupils, the teacher gives them brief background information on the product. Since I chose to use stove, I give brief information on stove below.

Kitchen Stove

Kitchen stove is used for cooking food. Nowadays, people use kerosene stove, electric stove or gas cooker to cook food. But there have not always been these stoves. In the olden days, people cook food on open fire made with firewood or charcoal – some people still do today.

Majority of people use open stove until in 1826 when James Sharp gave the world an alternative. Then in 1892, Frans Wilhem increased the alternative to two by developing kerosene stove. Finally, Thomas Ahearn invented electric stove also in 1892.

Objectives of invention

Following the brief information above, the teacher recalls the pupils’ attention to the topic by asking this question:

“I the end objective of all the different kinds of stove is to cook food and people at that time are able to achieve that objective with the earlier open fire, why do the inventors have to invent new things?”

The teacher receives attempts then explains the reason for new inventions.

Reasons for New Inventions

With respect to every human activity and way of life spanning through disciplines over the years; there have been innovative inventions such as stoves; and there always will be.

Just like the inventors of all inventions now in existence, the pupils may pioneer some of the yet-to-be innovations – the target of the subject. Every invention is a solution to a problem. Inventors invent so as to make work easier, faster and also make life better – i.e. more enjoyable.

So, the short answer to the question is this: to solve a problem, make work easier and faster or to make life better.

Once the reason for invention has been explained, the teacher once again asks the pupils the following questions, with reference to the stove illustration.

  1. What is the problem of cooking with open fire that gas stove address?
  2. What is the problem of cooking with gas stove that kerosene stove solve?
  3. What is the problem of kerosene stove that electric stove address?

For each question, the teacher receives answers from pupils and/or discusses it with them before proceeding to the next step.

Answer

1.       Problems of cooking with open fire
  • Disturbing smoke
  • Fire requires constant fanning
  • It makes chef or cook smells
  • It is slow to cook
  • Wind/breeze blows heat away from the pot
2.       Gas stove solves all these problems

The problem of cooking with gas stove is that gas was not readily available that time

3.       Problems of Kerosene Stove

Although kerosene stove turned out to be a very good option, if it is not properly set, the fume or smoke stains cooking utensils black. Electric stove solves this problem.

After going through the problems of each type of stove and how the subsequent invention corrects the problem, the teacher teaches the pupils that the essence of the subject (Basic Technology) is to teach them how to solve problems by inventing new things – products or process. S/he concludes the step that before that however, they (the pupils) need to knows a few things about technology – which begins with the meaning of technology, the week’s lesson. The teacher then explains the target (objectives of the lesson)

Step 2: Meaning of Technology

After revealing the objectives of the lesson in the last step above, the teacher writes, projects or displays the topic on the board. Following this, the teacher asks what the pupils think the word means and receives as many attempts as possible. At the end, s/he writes, projects or displays the definition on the board/screen and gives a thorough explanations.

Meaning of technology

Technology is the use of scientific knowledge and human reasoning to create inventions that make work easier, faster and faster and also make life better.

The teacher, through explanation, corrects the notion that technology is exclusive to computing and highly complex devices. S/he explains the underlined keywords:

Scientific Knowledge means what we learn from (Basic) science. Human reasoning means the creativity of the inventor. Inventions means whatever someone creates especially for the first time – what has never been done before. Invention may be a product or a process (way of doing something). Invention must not necessarily be something revolutionary. The person that makes something that has never been made before is called an inventor.

The teacher explains the definition with more examples of products of technology using clips and/or charts – tracing each to the historical developments with emphasis on the problems that each invention solves.

Step 3: Products of Technology

Once the teacher adequately explains the meaning of technology and s/he ascertains that the pupils have understood it, s/he leads the pupils to identify some products of technology. Some of the products of technology are:

  1. Fan – fan and electric
  2. Blender – improvement over grinding stone
  3. Bicycle – improvement over trekking
  4. Motorcycle
  5. Car
  6. Airplane
  7. Phones
  8. Computer
  9. Radio
  10. Wheelbarrow
  11. Robots,
  12. Modern weaving and sewing method
  13. Umbrella
  14. Train
  15. Refrigerator, etc.

Step 4: Benefits of Technology

After identifying some products of technology, the teacher leads the pupils to list out the benefits of technology. S/he first of all explains the meaning of benefit –benefit means what people get out of something. Thereafter, s/he asks what the pupils think people get out of technology. Following the discussion the teacher list and explains the following benefits:

  1. Productivity – this means technology help people to do more things
  2. Efficiency – this means people use technology to reduce wastage
  3. Wealth – those who practice technology and invent new things are paid for it – they make money from it.
  4. Cost reduction – with technology, people are able to reduce the cost of production by hiring fewer workers.

Step 5: Inspiring the inventor mindset

Succeeding the identification and explanation of the benefits of technology, the teacher once more encourages the pupils to always assume the mindset of inventors – that is, to be innovative. S/he advises them to be problem solvers. They should observe the problem in the immediate environment, write it down and think of a way to solve it – the teacher may give this an exercise. Finally, the teacher teaches them that to solve more problems; they need to be well-informed and knowledgeable. Hence, the pupils must be serious with their academic works.

Step 6: Note writing

Prior to evaluation and subsequent conclusion of the lesson, the teacher summarizes the lesson into a concise note. Then s/he copies the note on the board for the pupils to copy into their notes. As they write, the teacher moves round to effect necessary guidance and corrections.

Board Summary

Meaning of Technology

Technology is the use of scientific knowledge and human reasoning to create inventions that make work easier, faster and faster and also make life better.

Scientific Knowledge means what we learn from science. Human reasoning means the ability to think of a solution or do something in a better way. Invention means the thing that has never been done before. Invention may be a product or a process (way of doing something). The person that makes something that has never been made before is called an inventor.

Products of Technology

Products of technology are the objects we get through technology. Some products of technology include:

  1. Fan – fan and electric
  2. Blender – improvement over grinding stone
  3. Bicycle – improvement over trekking
  4. Motorcycle
  5. Car
  6. Airplane
  7. Phones
  8. Computer
  9. Radio
  10. Wheelbarrow
  11. Robots,
  12. Modern weaving and sewing method
  13. Umbrella
  14. Train
  15. Refrigerator, etc.
Benefits of Technology

Benefits of technology are the good things we get when we use technology or products of technology. Some of the benefits of technology are:

  1. Productivity – this means technology help people to do more things
  2. Efficiency – this means people use technology to do more things in less time.
  3. Wealth –technology help us to make money.
  4. Cost reduction –technology help people to spend less money at work.

After the note writing exercise, the teacher reads it several times with the pupils. The teacher should note that s/he is not necessarily to leave the note until the end of the lesson. Because s/he may teacher the entire lesson in two to four lessons, it is more advisable to give the pupils the note for each topic the teacher treats. This will further lessen the burden of having to write lengthy note at a seating for the pupils.

EVALUATION

Assessment of Affective Objectives

The teacher carries out evaluation of affective objectives in an ongoing process. At various stages of the lesson the pupils should express willingness or desire to invent. They may say this casually. However the teacher takes note of all of such observations. S/he may commend and encourage such pupil(s).

Assessment of Cognitive Objectives

To evaluate the cognitive objectives, the teacher tells the pupils that before they could proceed to invent, s/he has to be sure that they now know the meaning of technology. So, s/he will have to ask them some questions.

Questions

  1. What is technology?
  2. Mention 10 products of technology
  3. Why do people invent new things?
  4. A person that invents new thing is called ____________
  5. Mention three inventions and their inventors

Assessment of Psychomotor Objectives

Following the assessment of cognitive objectives, the teacher gives the pupils the classroom model project.

Question

Using the classroom design, the materials listed below and the following instructions; create a classroom model.

NOTE: The pupils did the classroom design in their science class earlier. The teacher should first of all demonstrate each step of creating the model for the pupils. This project may be done individually or in groups. In the case of the later, the teacher should group the pupils accordingly.

CONCLUSION

The teacher concludes the lesson by marking and grading the pupils. Each pupil or group presents their project to the class. The group identifies the objects in the classroom and how the objects are arranged. The teacher takes note of the creativity of each child or group in terms of aesthetic and arrangement of their models.

At the end of the presentation, the teacher makes necessary corrections then links the lesson to the following week’s topic – Things in the home and school.

Welcome to your Feedback

Name
Email
Did you find this article helpful?
What do you think we should improve on in our articles?