Lesson Note: Third Term Week 2 – 3 Letter Work for Pre-Nursery

Spread the love

TOPIC

Learning names of objects through “Lucky Dip” and matching of objects with letters A-a – T-t

OBJECTIVES

By the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following objectives:

  • Identify the each of the letters from Aa to Tt
  • Mention at least one object that begins with each letter
  • Develop awareness of the sound of each of the letters Aa – Tt

PRESENTATION

The teacher presents the lesson in order of steps as outlined below.

Step 1: Introduction

The teacher introduces the lesson by revising past lessons on recognition of letters. First, s/he asks the pupils whether they are still able to read letters A – Z. Therefore, the teacher leads the pupils to oral reading of letters A – Z. After this, s/he picking a letter at time asks the pupils what letter it is. For reinforcement, the teacher displays two letters then asks the pupils, one at a time, to pick a named letter from among the two. To conclude the letter recognition revision, the teacher repeats the last exercise several times – but each time, the teacher increases the number of letters from which the pupils will pick only one named letter.

Following the revision of oral reading and recognition of letters, the teacher introduces the week’s lesson proper. To do this, the teacher tells the pupils that since they are now able to read and recognize the letters; they will now learn how to read like people in higher classes or adults– S/he then asks if they like that. They probably would! Hence, the teacher explains that the first step to be able to read like adults or people in higher classes is to identify the sound of the letters. In furtherance of the explanation, the teacher reveals that the letters they read earlier only represents the sound. And also, the representation of the sound is contained in the spelling (names) of objects we see, uses, play with and talk about every day.

Succeeding this, the teacher tells the pupils that they shall be learning the names of some objects. After this but before proceeding to step two, the teacher cautions the pupils to listen attentively and participate in this learning else they will not be able to read like adults or people in higher classes.

Step 2: Identification of common objects starting with A – T

At this stage the teacher displays common objects – it could be the concrete models, a large wall chart or individual pictures of the objects – whose spellings starts with letters A – T. Afterwards, s/he points at each object – or if individual picture of the objects are being used, the teacher picks one at a time then asks the pupils the name of the object. For example, the teacher displays an apple then asks the pupils, “what is this (called)?” Below is a list of objects that the teacher could use.

COMMON OBJECTS STARTING WITH A – T

 

Apple

Ant

Ball

Bell

Banana

Biscuit

Basket

Cat

Car

Card

 

Cap

Cage

Dog

Doll

Door

Duck

Egg

Elephant

Fish

Flag

 

Fan

Goat

Gate

Hen

Hat

Hut

House

Ink

Jug

 

Juice – teacher should differentiate between juice and juice brand such as Five-Alive, bobo, Viju, e.t.c

 

Kettle

Kangaroo

Lamp

Lion

Lamb (teacher picks only one of Lamb and Lamp to avoid confusing the pupils)

Mango

Mat

Net

 

Nail

Nurse

Orange

Onion

Pencil

Pen

Pepper

Paper

Queen

 

Rat

Rice

Ram

Rain

Road

Ring

Sun

Snail

Star

Table

Tailor

 

 

The exercise in the last paragraph is repeated until the pupils demonstrate ability to identify the different objects.

Step 3: Basic Phonetic Sound of letters A – T

Once the teacher ascertains that the pupils are able to identify each of the objects; s/he proceeds to basic sound awareness – the teacher first of all explains the concept of sound at the most elementary level. S/he does this by teaching the pupils the basic sound of each of the letters A to T. The teacher explains that the sound of letter:

 

A is / æ /

B is /b/

C is /k/

D is /d/

E is / e/

F is /f/

G is /g/

H is /h/

I is /i/

J is / ʤ/

 

K is /k/

L is /l/

M is /m/

N is /n/

O is / əʊ̯ /

P is /p/

Q is /kw/

R is /r/

S is /s/

T is /t/

 

 

NOTE: The teacher is not to burden the pupils with any of the phonetic symbols above. Instead the teacher should use it to produce the sound of the corresponding letter. More so, it is not intended that pupils compulsorily learn how to produce the sound as they will do so in their phonetics or phonics– a basic awareness (i.e. recognizing which letter produces a named sound) suffice.

To ascertain whether the pupils have developed basic sound awareness after explaining the sound of each letter, the teacher makes a sound then asks the pupils to name the letter which produces the sound – this may be repeated with different sound. Following this, the teacher proceeds to step 4.

Step 4: Matching Common Objects Beginning with letters A – T to the corresponding letters: Lucky Dip

Succeeding step 3, the teacher proceeds to matching the objects to the corresponding beginning letters. To do this, s/he first of all calls the name of each object and asks the pupils to name the letter with the beginning sound of the named object. For example, the teacher calls Apple, with emphasis on the beginning sound / æ /; then asks the pupils the letter that produces that first sound.

After this, then the teacher leads the pupils to the Lucky Dip activity. The teacher puts a cutout pictures of the objects listed earlier inside the ‘Dip’ container. The number of the cutout pictures should be one more than the number of pupils in the class – one for each pupil and the teacher. After that, s/he [the teacher] tells the pupils they are going to play a game (known as Lucky Dip) in which everyone is going to play a part. Thereafter, s/he explains the game to the pupils:

Each of them will go to the Dip container, pick only one picture cutout; then tells the class what s/he picks in this format: I picked the picture of a (object), the first letter of (the object) is ______.

After the explanation/description of the game, the teacher demonstrates it then calls out the pupils, one after another to do same.

TIP: The teacher may keep reward for those that will successfully play their part.

READING AND EVALUATION

Subsequent to the Lucky Dip activity, the teacher leads the pupils to read A for Apple and Ant; B for Ball, Bell, Banana, Biscuit and Basket; e.t.c. several times.

After the reading, the teacher assesses the pupils’ understanding based on the lesson objectives.

FINAL COMMENT

[1]For the Lucky Dip exercise, the teacher should consider the special children such as those that are shy. Such children that are shy may not readily talk. Hence, suggestions are provided in our earlier post on How to teach Shy Children.

[2] In addition to returning users, about 1, 000 new users visit our lesson note thread every month. That means more people are finding our lesson notes useful. You might be helping someone by sharing the posts you find useful.

[3] We welcome suggestions, creative criticisms, questions and commendations. You can drop yours in the comment box anywhere on the website or contact us via support@Leadinguides.com on social media using our handle @LeadinGuides. WhatsApp: +2348067689217

a game in which small prizes are concealed in a container and chosen at random by participants.

Leave a Reply